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Financial abuse of elderly ‘rampant, but invisible’

20. Juni 2018 - 23:10

Older people are increasingly subject to financial abuse, in many cases by their own family members, a United Nations human rights expert warned on Thursday.

“Financial abuse of older persons is rampant but largely invisible, and the problem is expected to grow dramatically with the ageing of our societies”, said the UN-appointed independent expert on the enjoyment of all human rights by older persons, Rosa Kornfeld-Matte, in a statement to mark World Elder Abuse Awareness Day on 15 June.

She says most abuse goes undetected, and it is impossible to say how big the problem is, as data is scarce because of under-reporting.

“Sadly, most abusers are family members”, said Ms. Kornfeld-Matte. “This is a particularly delicate matter”, she added, explaining that even experienced professionals have difficulty distinguishing an unwise but legitimate financial transaction, from an exploitative one that was the result of undue influence, duress, fraud, or a lack of informed consent.

Financial abuse reflects a pattern of behaviour rather than a single event, and occurs over a period of time.

She said that older people may even tacitly acknowledge it, or feel that the perpetrator has some entitlement to their assets.

“Some older people also have a desire to compensate those who provide them with care, affection, or attention”, she said.

Ms. Kornfeld-Matte urged older people to report cases of abuse to the authorities, even though they feel embarrassed or fear retaliation, including withdrawal of affection and care.

“One of the few ways to stop financial abuse of older people is to report it. If you suspect that someone you care about has been or is being abused, I can only urge you to speak up”, she said.

Source: UN News

Kategorien: english

Everyone has ‘a moral imperative’ to uphold the rights of persons with disabilities

20. Juni 2018 - 15:29

Cementing and protecting the rights of around 1.5 billion people around the world in accordance with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is a “moral imperative” said United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres on Tuesday.

He was addressing a conference of signatories to the Convention at UN Headquarters in New York, describing it as one of the most widely-ratified international human rights treaties, which reaffirms that people with disabilities are entitled to the same treatment as everybody else.

“But signing and ratifying the Convention is not enough. Implementation is essential,” Mr. Guterres said. “Societies must be organized so that all people, including those with disabilities, can exercise their rights freely.”

The Secretary-General underscored that countries apply the Convention to their development policies, investments and legal systems, which is an important step “if we are to fulfil the central pledge of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: to leave no one behind.”

“We cannot afford to ignore or marginalize the contributions of 1.5 billion people,” he stated, pointing out that more had to be done for people with disabilities to fully participate in society.

People with disabilities still often face overt discrimination, stereotyping and lack of respect for their basic human rights – with women and girls disproportionately affected.

“Every minute, more than 30 women are seriously injured or disabled during childbirth,” elaborated the UN chief.

Moreover, women and girls with disabilities face multiple barriers to accessing education, health services and jobs.

“Without women’s empowerment and gender equality, millions of women will continue to suffer from double discrimination based on both their gender and their disability,” he added.

The Secretary-General spelled out the need for new approaches to work for and with people with disabilities, which include mainstreaming disability in national legislation and development strategies.

“It will also be crucial to continue and expand the work that United Nations agencies are doing to support Governments and develop their capacity on these issues,” he maintained, elaborating on the need to strengthen policy frameworks and laws on disability, in line with the Convention and the 2030 Agenda.

He concluded by noting that a comprehensive review would be looking at all aspects of how the Organization addresses disability, as well as informing a new UN Action Plan and an accountability framework “to help us aim higher and live up to our promises.”

Signing through an interpreter, Colin Allen, Chair of the international Disability Alliance, spotlighted the strength of working collectively to achieve true and meaningful change.

“For the people in this room, and for the more than one billion people we represent,” said Mr. Allen, “we are building a strong and solid platform that will propel us forward.”

Catalina Devandas Aguilar, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities noted that while progress has been made, it is not reaching everyone in the same way.

“There is a great demand for public interventions of better and higher quality,” she said, adding: “Only by working together will we fulfil our common goal of leaving no one behind.”

“Together, we can remove barriers and raise awareness, so that people with disabilities can play a full part in every sphere of society, around the world”, she said.

Source: UN News

Kategorien: english

UNDESA-DISD Newsletter, June 2018

1. Juni 2018 - 22:51
Inclusion, Full Participation and Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities

The 11th session of the Conference of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will take place at the UN Headquarters in New York from 12 to 14 June 2018.

During the Conference, 177 States Parties to the Convention, observers, UN entities, and civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, will gather together to discuss the challenges and opportunities to further advance the rights of persons with disabilities and the implementation of the Convention in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other global development agendas.

The overarching theme of the 11th session is “Leaving no one behind through the full implementation of the CRPD”.

Learn more about the 11th session here.

Family Policies for Inclusive Societies The Division for Inclusive Social Development (DISD) of the Department of Economic and Social affairs (UNDESA) organized an Expert Group Meeting (EGM) on “Family policies for inclusive societies”, 15-16 May 2018 at UN Headquarters in New York

The meeting aimed to analyze the importance of family policies for the achievement of SDG 16 and SDG 11. Experts made presentations, participated in group discussions and gave their expert opinion and policy recommendations on family policy development, monitoring and implementation. The experts also provided specific examples of good practices in family policy making and offered detailed recommendations on further development of policies, programmes and strategies.

Learn more about the EGM on Family Policies for Inclusive Societies, 15-16 May 2018 here.

 

International Day of Families

The 2018 observance of the International day of Families focused on Sustainable Development Goal 16 relating to the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development. The theme this year is ““Families and inclusive societies” .

The international panel discussion focused on the importance of ensuring equal justice to all family members, especially women. It also addressed the efforts at universal birth registration and legal identity for all, especially targeting vulnerable families. The importance of social protection for social inclusion and other aspects of socially inclusive and family-oriented policies were addressed as well.

Learn more about the International Day of Families, 15 May 2018 here.

SDGs & Families: Results of the global research projects

Awareness raising event in observance of the 2018 International Day of Families organized by the International Federation for Family Development (IFFD), in partnership with SOS Children’s Villages International, and the collaboration of UNICEF and the Division for Social Policy and Development of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA DSPD). The event is to demonstrate how families and policies for families, can contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals 1-5, 8 & 16.

Featured Stories World needs Generation of Young Self-empowered ‘Superheros’ 

The United Nations needs to spend more time talking directly to young people across the world, beyond simply talking about their concerns, said the President of the General Assembly on Wednesday, opening a major Youth Dialogue event at UN Headquarters in New York.

More information about the Youth Dialogue here. AI for Good: Accelerating Progress towards the SDGs

The 2nd edition of the AI for Good Global Summit was organized by ITU in Geneva on 15-17 May 2018, in partnership with XPRIZE Foundation, the global leader in incentivized prize competitions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and sister United Nations agencies.

More information about the summit here.

COFACE Families Europe celebrates 60 years of active engagement

On May 15 2018 the International Day of Families, the United Nations celebrated families and inclusive societies, highlighting the role of families and family policies in advancing Sustainable Development. On this occasion, COFACE Families Europe was celebrating its 60th anniversary looking back at the achievements of family organizations in Europe, and starting from there to build a sustainable future for all families.

More information about COFACE Families Europe here.

Publications The role of Families and Family Policies in Achieving Inclusive Societies  

The implementation, success, and sustainability of SDGs 16 and 11 are greatly dependent on a family focused approach that takes into consideration the contexts within which decisions about laws, policies, and programmes are made. Isolated approaches that target individuals without consideration of the larger family environments in which they are embedded are destined to fail. It is thus, imperative that families in all their various forms, need to be recognized, targeted, strengthened, and supported.SDG16 promoting peaceful and inclusive societies relies on families to create and raise the next generation of peaceful, stable citizens and productive workers. Encouraging positive child and youth development is a key component of this goal, as well as stabilizing family environments through strengthening family relationships and providing basic financial stability. The eradication of poverty is key to decreasing stressors on families.

Download the full report here. Economic Development in Africa Report 2018: Migration for Structural Transformation

Migration benefits both origin and destination countries across Africa. The report argues that African migration can play a key role in the structural transformation of the continent’s economies. Well-managed migration also provides an important means for helping to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, both in Africa and beyond.

More information about the report here.

Multimedia  #Youth Dialogue

 

 

International Day of Families

Check out more on DSPD’s Flickr and YouTube accounts

Upcoming Events

12-14 June: 11th session of the Conference of States Parties to the CRPD 
13 June: International Albinism Awareness Day 
15 June: World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
20 June: World Refugee Day

 Copyright ©2017 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs – Division for Social Policy and Development, All rights reserved.

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All content provided in this newsletter is for informational purposes only, is not endorsed by the United Nations, and does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations. The United Nations makes no representations as to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the newsletter’s contents.

Kategorien: english

Migration in Africa plays growing development role

1. Juni 2018 - 21:32

African migration could boost growth and positively transform the structure of the continent’s economy, UNCTAD’s 2018 Economic Development in Africa Report reveals.

“Population movements across borders often offer individuals a chance for a better life, with the social and economic benefits extending to both source and destination countries, as well as future generations,” UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi said.

“Our analysis shows this to be true for millions of African migrants and their families. Yet much of the public discourse, particularly as it relates to international African migration, is rife with misconceptions that have become part of a divisive, misleading and harmful narrative.”

The new report, subtitled “Migration for Structural Transformation”, does much to counter this narrative. Historically and in line with established trends, the report says that most African migrants move within the continent.

Africa report 2018 Download:

In 2017, the report says, 19 million international migrants moved within Africa and 17 million Africans left the continent. In addition, Africa is a migration destination for 5.5 million people who came from outside the continent.

Behind the numbers

The report follows the stories of Mamadou and Ramatoulaye from Senegal, and Afwerki from Ethiopia. While they are fictional avatars for two different types of migrants – skilled and low-skilled – their stories illustrate the benefits and pitfalls that intra-Africa migration has for trade and development on the continent.

In 2017, the top five intra-African migration destinations (receiving countries in descending order) were South Africa, Cote d’Ivoire, Uganda, Nigeria, and Ethiopia (all exceeding 1 million migrants), the report says.

Behind the numbers lies economic analysis that shows the net benefit of migration in Africa.

The contribution of migrants to GDP was measured at 19% in Côte d’Ivoire (2008), 13% in Rwanda (2012), 9% in South Africa (2011) and 1% in Ghana (2010).

Meanwhile, remittance inflows from outside and within Africa rose on average from $38.4 billion (2005–2007), to $64.9 billion (2014–2016). These accounted for 51% of private capital flows in Africa in 2016, up from 42% in 2010.

This is why both intra and extra-continental migration are needed for supporting Africa’s structural transformation.

Migration and trade

The report provides evidence on the “intimate correlation between two sides of the same coin: migration and trade” said UNCTAD’s Junior Roy Davis, a lead author on the report.

“Africa is on the cusp of tremendous change,” he said. “On 21 March 2018, 44 African countries signed the establishment of the African Continental Free Trade Area and 30 of them signed the Protocol on the Free Movement of Persons.”

He added: “These critical milestones follow the launch of the Single African Air Transport Market in January 2018. In this context the report contributes to a better understanding of the implications of intra-African migration for the continent’s socio-economic transformation.”

Other findings from the report include:

  • The average age of Africa’s international migrants in 2017 was 31 years – the lowest median age globally.
  • In 2017, female migrants comprised almost half of all international migrants in Africa (47%). The absolute number of international female migrants increased from 6.9 million in 2000 to 11.6 million in 2017.
  • Africa hosts the bulk of the world’s refugees and internally displaced people.

The report’s analysis of the role of intra-continental migration in Africa’s development trajectory makes it a reference document that aims to assist in defining an African position in the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration to be adopted in Marrakesh in December 2018.

Source: UNCTAD

Kategorien: english

Inclusion, Full participation and Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities

1. Juni 2018 - 20:08

The 11th session of the Conference of States Parties to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities will take place at the UN Headquarters in New York from 12 to 14 June 2018.

During the Conference, 177 States Parties to the Convention, observers, UN entities, and civil society organizations, including organizations of persons with disabilities, will gather together to discuss the challenges and opportunities to further advance the rights of persons with disabilities and the implementation of the Convention in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other global development agendas.

In addition to the main programme of the Conference, over 50 side events covering a range of relevant topics and cross-cutting issues will take place at the UN Headquarters as well.

The overarching theme of the 11th session is “Leaving no one behind through the full implementation of the CRPD”.

Three sub-themes will serve as the topics for a series of round table discussions, and are as follows:

1) National fiscal space, public-private partnerships and international cooperation for strengthening the implementation of the CRPD;
2) Women and girls with disabilities;
3) Political participation and equal recognition before the law.

The 11th session aims to further raise the awareness and understanding of disability issues, and the rights, needs and contributions of persons with disabilities, and to exchange experience and good practices in exploring the potential of using the CRPD to advance inclusive, accessible and resilient society and sustainable development for all.

Source: UNDESA-DISD

Kategorien: english

World needs generation of young self-empowered ‘superheroes’

1. Juni 2018 - 20:07

The United Nations needs to spend more time talking directly to young people across the world, beyond simply talking about their concerns, said the President of the General Assembly on Wednesday, opening a major Youth Dialogue event at UN Headquarters in New York.

“They still feel they are excluded, from the decisions that are affecting their lives,” said Miroslav Lajčák,  adding that “we want this to be an event when we take a step back, and we listen to young people, talking to each other.”

Quite often, he said,  “they have a feeling that when they speak, no one is listening”.

He added that the themes he was keen to hear their views on were education, jobs, and the complex issue of how young people could be dissuaded from taking a path towards violent extremism. “We talk about it, but we still don’t really get it – don’t really grasp it,” he said.

Other speakers included an athelete from the Pacific island nation of Tonga, who won world re-known, when he marched shirtless into the opening ceremony of the Rio Olympic Games in 2016, carrying his country’s flag.

“The world does not need violence, does not need bombs, the world needs today’s youth to become superheroes,” said Pita Taufatofua.

At the UN, wearing a shirt, he said his brother advised him to “keep your shirt on and leave the oil at home”.

The second piece of advice from his brother was, “tell your truth, leave the youth with something they can take into the future,” Mr. Taufatofua said.

Pita Taufatofua, Tongan Olympian addresses General Assembly’s Youth Dialogue

One day as a child, he was coming home with his father, expecting that a superhero outfit was waiting for him at home. But there was nothing waiting for him. “That was my first experience of disappointment,” he said.

So what do people do when they get disappointed, he asked.

“They minimize their expectations of themselves because that’s how we reduce pain,” he said. “Unfortunately, with minimizing expectations of ourselves, we also minimize our potential to achieve our dreams and goals.”

The formula for becoming a superhero is to have the ability to deal with failures and pains and to dream big, he said.

He dreamt of becoming an Olympian when he was 12. That dream never left him. After 20 years of pain, his dream finally came true in Rio.

Now 34, he was one of the many speakers invited to today’s event, titled Youth Dialogue, which was held to bring the United Nations closer to young people.

(Check out our exclusive interview with Pita Taufatofua here)

The one-day event sought to highlight the ideas, needs and concerns of young people on education and employment, as well as how to prevent radicalization of youth.

Jayathma Wickramanayake, the Secretary General’s Envoy on Youth addresses the UN General Assembly’s Youth Dialogue

Jayathma Wickramanayake, the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, said most mainstream media appears to be “on a mission” to create an image of young people as a generation of careless or lazy individuals, who, if not managed well, could turn into a threat or burden to a country.

However, that is not the case, she argued: “If we are to realistically achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), it is our generation who is going to do this. We are the SDG generation. The rest of the world can try, but they can’t, or won’t, make it without [us].”

Otherwise known as the Global Goals, the SDGs are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity.

Other speakers included Sheikha Hind bint Hamad Al-Thani, Vice-Chairperson and Chief Executive Officer of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development; Mari Malek, model, disc jockey and founder of “Stand For Education” and singer Emmanuel Kelly.

Source: UN News

Kategorien: english

Tackling corruption ‘from the top down’ essential

24. Mai 2018 - 16:22

“It all begins with setting an example. By tackling corruption, Governments can show they mean business,” said Secretary-General António Guterres, speaking at a high-level event marking the 15th anniversary of the UN Convention Against Corruption.

“Society cannot function equitably and efficiently when public officials – from doctors to police, judges and politicians – enrich themselves rather than perform their duties with integrity,” he added.

Adopted in 2003, the Convention Against Corruption is the only legally-binding universal instrument, drawn up to fight corruption in all its forms.

Society cannot function equitably and efficiently when public officials – from doctors to police, judges and politicians – enrich themselves rather than perform their duties with integrity— Secretary-General António Guterres

In his remarks, Mr. Guterres also underlined that in addition to robbing vital resources from public services such as schools and hospitals, corruption also fuels human trafficking and the black market in natural resources, weapons, drugs and cultural artifacts.

“It fuels conflict, and when a hard-won peace is achieved, corruption undermines recovery. Corruption and impunity are corrosive, breeding frustration and fostering further corruption when people see no other way of achieving their goals,” said the UN chief, calling for greater political and popular support for the fight against corruption.

He described the Convention Against Corruption as one of the most effective tools the world has to achieve the common goals of good governance, stability and prosperity.

“The UN will continue to support Member States every step of the way, from helping to engage and empower citizens in this fight, to helping build and enhance institutions that can deliver on their promise,” said Mr. Guterres.

Corruption ‘destroys everything in its path’

Speaking alongside the Secretary-General, Miroslav Lajčák, the President of the UN General Assembly also reiterated that corruption hurts all sections of the society and that it “destroys everything in its path.”

Ultimately, corruption causes suffering to ordinary people going about their daily lives, he stressed, citing common examples: “When they are stopped at checkpoints, for bribes. When a bus does not come – or a clinic does not open – because budgets were mismanaged. Or when they lose all of their savings, from extortion,” said Mr. Lajčák.

He also highlighted the link between the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and good governance.

“If we want to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), we need to take concrete steps. This will mean allocating budgets. It will mean raising more funds. It will mean new policies and new legislation”, he said, adding that more innovative ways needed to be found of “working together”.

Yury Fedotov, the Executive-Director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) also underscored the importance of the Convention for sustainable development.

Noting that while Sustainable Development Goal 16 (SDG16) explicitly urges action against corruption, tackling the problem is a prerequisite for overall economic growth.

“Anti-corruption responses are also crucial to ensuring access to healthcare, water, education and other vital services; protecting forests, oceans and wildlife; and reducing inequalities,” he added.

Source: UN News 

Kategorien: english

Social Protection for Sustainable Development

11. Mai 2018 - 21:14

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) lay out a set of key development objectives for developed and developing countries alike to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all.

Among the priorities agreed upon by Member States is social protection—repeatedly cited in the agenda as a primary means to reduce poverty and combat inequality. For instance, the high-ranking SDG 1.3 calls countries to “implement nationally appropriate social protection systems and measures for all, including floors, and by 2030 achieve substantial coverage of the poor and the vulnerable.” Currently, an estimated 73 per cent of the world’s population lives without adequate social protection coverage. This means the ambitious objective set out by the 2030 Agenda will require concerted efforts from across the spectrum of UN and national actors, joining up disparate interventions and leveraging new tools to achieve the 2030 target.

Designed in partnership with the International Labour Organization (ILO) Social Protection Department, this online course equips participants with a solid understanding of social protection and its relevance for Sustainable Development. The course will showcase experiences from countries representing different contexts and regions on work done to extend social protection in the context of the 2030 Agenda.

By the end of this online course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the meaning and benefits of social protection and its role in the Sustainable Development Agenda
  • Identify key examples of global trends and good practices from countries in extending social protection
  • Identify practical tools to implement social protection at the country level

The tutored online course combines self-paced modules, asynchronous activities as well as live webinars with renowned experts of social protection and sustainable development. Real-life case studies and interactive group discussions will also be used to prompt participants’ reflection and application of knowledge.

The course comprises 5 modules over 5 weeks:

  • Week 1: Basics of social protection
  • Week 2: Social protection and the 2030 Agenda
  • Week 3: Global trends and good practices in extending social protection
  • Week 4: Designing and implementing social protection systems
  • Week 5: Tools at our fingertips

Check out the event website for the registration and more of the event.

Source: 

Kategorien: english

COFACE Families Europe celebrates 60 years of active engagement

10. Mai 2018 - 21:52

On May 15 2018 the International Day of Families, the United Nations will celebrate families and inclusive societies, highlighting the role of families and family policies in advancing Sustainable Development. The approaches to families policies for inclusive societies vary around the world. The observance is to raise awareness of the role of families and family policies in achieving more inclusive societies from regional perspectives.

On this occasion, COFACE Families Europe is celebrating its 60th anniversary looking back at the achievements of family organisations in Europe, and starting from there to build a sustainable future for all families.

Born in 1958, COFACE is a separate arm of the International Union of Family Organizations, following the creation of the European Economic Community, as ‘the Family Consumption Committee’ and piece by piece. COFACE members mainstreamed the family perspective beyond consumer policy, namely in the social, education, and disability fields.

Today, COFACE Families Europe is an open and pluralistic network of national/regional organizations representing families in their diversity, striving to build a ‘better society for all families’ driven by solidarity, non-discrimination and equal opportunities.

These values guide actions at EU level to support the implementation of key agendas such as the European Pillar of Social Rights, and the international obligations under the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. COFACE members create synergies both internally and externally through their wide range of expertise spanning different areas: from social policy to education, financial inclusion, disability, care/support, gender equality, migration, consumer issues, safer internet and data protection.

Looking to the future, Annemie Drieskens, COFACE Families Europe President: More than ever, pluralistic civil society organisations like COFACE need broad support to promote core European values, and to build bridges between local and EU level. Family organisations are essential for democracy holding governments at all level accountable. They are watchdogs and agents of change drawing attention to the emerging needs of families. Together they strive for the respect and implementation of fundamental rights and a better society for all European families”. This commitment must be reflected in the future ambitions of the European Union, in line with the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

COFACE has published a series of drawings illustrating 30 milestones of its history, as well as a digital exhibition with real pieces of history. Find all the material here.

More information about COFACE families Europe here.

Source: COFACE 

Kategorien: english

AI for Good: Accelerating Progress towards the SDGs

9. Mai 2018 - 15:25

The 2nd edition of the AI for Good Global Summit will be organized by ITU in Geneva on 15-17 May 2018, in partnership with XPRIZE Foundation, the global leader in incentivized prize competitions, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and sister United Nations agencies including UNESCOUNICEFUNCTADUNIDOGlobal PulseUNICRIUNODAUNIDIRUNODCWFPIFADUNAIDSWIPOILOUNITARUNOPSOHCHRUN UniversityWHOUNEPICAOUNDPThe World BankUN DESACTBTOUNISDRUNOGUNOOSAUNFPAUNECEUNDPA, and UNHCR.

The AI for Good series is the leading United Nations platform for dialogue on AI. The action​​-oriented 2018 summit will identify practical applications of AI and supporting strategies to improve the quality and sustainability of life on our planet. The summit will continue to formulate strategies to ensure trusted, safe and inclusive development of AI technologies and equitable access to their benefits. 

While the 2017 summit sparked the first ever inclusive global dialogue on beneficial AI, the action-oriented 2018 summit will focus on impactful AI solutions able to yield long-term benefits and help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). ‘Breakthrough teams’ will demonstrate the potential of AI to map poverty and aid with natural disasters using satellite imagery, how AI could assist the delivery of citizen-centric services in smart cities, and new opportunities for AI to help achieve Universal Health Coverage, and finally to help achieve transparency and explainability in AI algorithms.

Teams will propose impactful AI strategies able to be enacted in the near term, guided by an expert audience of mentors representing government, industry, academia and civil society. Strategies will be evaluated by the mentors according to their feasibility and scalability, potential to address truly global challenges, degree of supporting advocacy, and applicability to market failures beyond the scope of government and industry. The exercise will connect AI innovators with public and private-sector decision-makers, building collaboration to take promising strategies forward. 

Learn more about the AI for Good Global Summit.

Source: ITU

Kategorien: english

Are you the next SDG Pioneer?

7. Mai 2018 - 18:41
In 2016, at the launch of the first class of SDG Pioneers, over 600 submissions were received from 100 countries. The UN Global Compact selected a group of SDG Pioneers from diverse regions of the world who were showcasing how business can be a force for good.For the 2018 SDG Pioneers campaign, we are calling on individuals who are doing an exceptional job of taking action on sustainable development issues through their own company or by mobilizing other businesses to do so. SDG Pioneers must be actively helping to reach one or more of the Global Goals while also contributing to business success.A multi-stakeholder External Selection Group comprised of representatives from the public, private and not-for-profit sectors will vote on the short-listed nominees and identify up the next SDG Pioneers.The SDG Pioneers will be announced and celebrated at the UN Global Compact Leaders Summit on 24 September 2018 in New York. They will receive visibility and recognition throughout the year for their efforts and achievements in advancing the SDGs.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) lay out a clear vision for a sustainable future and will shape a new era for business. As part of our Making Global Goals Local Business campaign, each year the UN Global Compact celebrates a group of SDG Pioneers — business leaders who are doing an exceptional job to advance the Global Goals through a principles-based approach.

Apply by 15 June 2018.

Source: UN Global Compact
Kategorien: english

Leveraging technology and innovation to build sustainable and resilient societies

4. Mai 2018 - 15:32

Science, technology and innovation can be leveraged as tools to effectively design a resilient future while leaving no one behind. They can promote inclusiveness, participation and transparency with the view to fostering sustainable and resilient societies.

This year, under the theme Innovative communities: leveraging technology and innovation to build sustainable and resilient societies’, the 2018 ECOSOC Integration Segment took place from 1 to 3 May at UN Headquarters in New York. It brought together key stakeholders – Member States, the United Nations system, other international organizations, the private sector, academic and civil society organizations – to assess the status of integration and coherence of actions towards achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Four areas were covered during the ECOSOC Integration Segment:

  • Discuss how policymakers can use integrated policy approaches to enhance resilience and inclusion to achieve the 2030 agenda at all levels
  • The meaningful exchange of best practices should be undertaken on how technology and innovation can be leveraged to effectively design a resilient future
  • Showcase policy instruments and mechanism that support risk management
  • Discuss how technology and innovation can support efforts to strengthen the resilience of public policies and governance structures with a view of sustainable and resilient societies

Mr. Marc Pecsteen de Buytswerve, Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council, opened the session: ‘the world is still facing economic uncertainty, rising inequalities, and the increasing impact of climate change’, and technology and innovation are ‘two key enablers to build and maintain resilient societies’.

Mr. Kamoliddinzoda Ilyos Jamoliddin, Deputy Minister of Economic Development and Trade, Tajikistan emphasized the importance of innovation and technology to water issues. Many central Asian countries, including Tajikistan, face the threats of climate change and related natural disasters and financial losses. Therefore, he called for international cooperation to leverage the benefits of innovation and technology and tackle these tasks to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

“New advances in science and technology hold immense promises for achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Liu Zhenmin stated in his opening remarks to a session of the intergovernmental body overseeing the UN’s development work.

Firstly, climate change is one of the greatest threats of our time. We need clear strategies for moving away from carbon-intense growth, towards more sustainable and resilient pathways for development.

Secondly, rising inequality and exclusion are undermining the sustainability and resilience of societies and eroding human rights. Technology can help provide jobs to disadvantaged groups in societies.

Thirdly, more than one-third of the world population now lives in an urban area, but cities face a range of challenges, from air pollution to youth insecurity and social exclusion. Technology can help make our cities more inclusive and sustainable by facilitating new transportation systems and improving management of natural resources.

Lastly, environmental degradation continues especially in water degradation and biodiversity loss. Technology facilitation mechanism should aim to provide a platform for discussing and accessing information, knowledge, best practices, and lessons learned.

“To truly leverage the benefits of science and technology for sustainable development, we need to prioritize solutions that are pro-poor and equitable,” Mr. Liu said. “Only in this way can we ensure that no one is left behind.”

Four keys principles were listed:

  1. Any efforts should be locally contextualized to leverage technology and innovation in support of communities.
  2. Technology and innovation need to be inclusive and leave no one behind.
  3. Taking integrated approaches is of utmost urgency as crises and shocks are increasingly complex.
  4. Building capacities and institutions for anticipating risk and for planning and strategic foresight to effectively leverage technologies.
Related information

Source: UNSDN 

Kategorien: english

‘Free, Informed Consent’ of Indigenous Peoples over Land-Use is Key

1. Mai 2018 - 16:37

The “free, informed consent” of Indigenous Peoples over how their historic territory is used, is a key demand arising from the latest UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, which ended on Friday.

That’s according to the chairperson of the Forum, Mariam Wallet Aboubakrine, who is a medical doctor from Mali, who told Liz Scaffidi how the two-week event had gone.

Watch the interview here.

Source: UN news Centre

Kategorien: english

UNDESA-DSPD Newsletter, May 2018

1. Mai 2018 - 11:00
The 17th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII)

The 17th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) took place from 16th to 27th April at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

More than 1000 indigenous participants from all over the world gathered to discuss on the priority theme “Indigenous peoples collective rights to lands, territories and resources”. General Assembly president Miroslav Lajčák pointed out that indigenous peoples, which comprise 15% of the world’s poorest population, are still excluded and marginalized in many areas. They face violence for asserting their basic rights and globally we need to work on these issues to defend their dignity and identity.

Learn more about the UNPFII here.
Watch the archived webcasts here.

Sports for SDGs: Together we can all make a difference Sport has proven to be a cost-effective and flexible tool in promoting peace and development objectives. Since the inception of the MDGs in 2000, sport has played a vital role in enhancing each of the eight goals, a fact which has been recognized in numerous Resolutions of the General Assembly. In the Declaration of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development sport’s role for social progress is further acknowledged.

On the occasion of the 2018 International Day of Sport for Development and Peace on 6 April, the Division for Social Policy and Development (DSPD) of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) is launching an online campaign to celebrate the growing contribution of sport to development and peace through the promotion of tolerance, respect, empowerment of women and youth, health, education and social inclusion.

Learn more about the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, 6 April 2018 here.

 

 

World Autism Awareness Day: Empowering Women and Girls with Autism

Women and girls were the focus on  World Autism Awareness Day, observed on 2 April: a segment of the global population that faces “multiple challenges,” as UN Secretary-General António Guterres stated in his message for the Day.

The UN Headquarters event included breakout panels exploring issues that have an impact on women and girls with autism such as gender disparity in diagnosis, racism and sexism, as well as the heightened risks they face of violence, sexual exploitation and abuse. American actress Dakota Fanning, star of the autism-themed film ‘Please Stand By,’ was among the panellists, who came from as far away as South Africa, Iceland and Poland. Watch the interview here.

Learn more about the World Autism Day, 2 April 2018 here.

Indigenous Peoples Gather for Annual Forum at the United Nations Thousands of representatives of indigenous peoples from all over the world gather at the 17th UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Taking place in United Nations Headquarters in New York from 16 to 27 April, the Forum addresses a number of issues related to indigenous people rights. Featured Stories Youth, ‘the Missing Peace’ to Tackle Global Challenges 

Jayathma Wickramanayake, the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, spoke at the open debate of the Security Council on youth, peace and security, underling 3 critical areas – supporting youth’s peace efforts; prioritizing their political participation; and partnering with them. The debate comes ahead of a high-level meeting on peacebuilding and sustaining peace convened by the President of the General Assembly, 24-25 April, at UN Headquarters in New York.

More information about the meeting here. Development Financing Forum, Breakaway from ‘Short-termism’

The United Nations will support countries’ path to sustainable development by brokering partnerships, pursuing innovative finance, leveraging resources and building the necessary capacities, senior officials said during the ECOSOC Forum on Financing for Development Follow-up (FfD) (23rd to 26th April), highlighting the need for a change of mind-set from “short-termism” to long-term investments.

More information about the forum here.

World Leaders Gather at UN to Renew Commitment to Build and Sustain Peace

Calling for more diplomacy, dialogue and mediation to head off conflicts before they break out, United Nations officials urged a gathering of world leaders on Tuesday, 24th April, 2018, to help strengthen a new approach to sustaining peace, which aims to put prevention at the heart of the UN’s work.

More information about the forum here.

Publications Promoting the Inclusion of Youth People through Social Protection 

Social protection is a potent policy tool to protect people from poverty throughout the life cycle. It can also reduce inequality and social exclusion. However, as the Report on the World Social Situation 2018 (United Nations, forthcoming) makes clear, access to social protection varies significantly depending on a person’s background or identity, including their age, race, and gender. This can limit its potential to promote inclusion.

In 2015, young people aged 15 to 24 years accounted for 1.2 billion, or 16 per cent, of the world’s population (United Nations, 2017). Creating a social and economic environment that enables these young people to thrive in adulthood—including through pathways to decent work—is central to promoting their inclusion.

Download the full report here. Financing for Development: Progress and Prospects 2018 

The 2018 report of the Inter-agency Task Force on Financing for Development finds that most types of development financing flows increased in 2017, and that there has been progress across all the action areas of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. This progress was underpinned by an upturn in the world economy, but at the same time the report warns that risks could derail development progress and structural impediments continue to undermine sustainable development prospects.

The 2018 report provides policy options which, if implemented, would put the world on a sustained and sustainable growth and development path. It also examines the financing challenges to the SDGs under in-depth review in 2018 to help assess progress in the means of implementation for goals on water and sanitation, affordable and clean energy, sustainable cities and communities, sustainable production and consumption, and terrestrial ecosystems.

Download the full report here. World Public Sector Report 2018 

The World Public Sector Report 2018 aims to inform efforts by countries to foster policy integration for implementing the SDGs. It asks, what are the challenges to and opportunities for policy integration across the different stages of policy cycle at the national level? What are some innovative examples of institutional and administrative arrangements that can foster integrated approaches to the 2030 Agenda?

The report distinguishes the dimensions of horizontal integration, i.e., integration across sectors or institutions; vertical integration, i.e., integration of policies and actions across various levels of government; and engagement, i.e., the inclusion of relevant stakeholders in the realisation of shared development objectives.

Download the full report here. Multimedia  #PlayforGlobalGoals 


UNPFII 17

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Upcoming Events

15 May: International Day of Families
21 – 22 May: High-level meeting of the Development Cooperation Forum
12 – 14 June: 11th session of the Conference of States Parties to the CRPD 
13 June: International Albinism Awareness Day 
15 June: World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

 Copyright ©2017 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs – Division for Social Policy and Development, All rights reserved.

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All content provided in this newsletter is for informational purposes only, is not endorsed by the United Nations, and does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations. The United Nations makes no representations as to the accuracy, completeness or reliability of the newsletter’s contents.

Kategorien: english

Women’s innovation, creativity take center stage on World Intellectual Property Day

27. April 2018 - 17:06

The United Nations agency behind  World Intellectual Property Day is calling for greater participation of women in the field of innovation and creativity to reap maximum benefits for society.

“At present, humanity is not realizing its full innovative and creative potential,” said Francis Gurry, the Director-General of the UN World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

“I call on everyone, everywhere, to ensure that we each do everything in our power to increase the full participation of women in innovation and creativity.”

According to WIPO, the number of women taking up leadership and senior roles in science, technology, business and the arts has increased.

For instance, in 1995, only 17 percent of international patent applications filed under WIPO’s Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) system included a woman among the inventors listed.

A deficit in the participation of women means that the current levels of innovation and creativity are suboptimal, said Mr. Gurry, adding “we are simply not reaping the full benefits that flow from innovation and creativity.”

Better use of the potential offered by the full breadth of the society – including women and men – will help humanity address the radical challenges it confronts such as climate change, clean energy, food security and health, stressed the WIPO chief.

Marked annually on 26 April, World Intellectual Property Day highlights the role of intellectual property rights, such as patents, trademarks, industrial designs, and copyright, in spurring innovation and creativity.

Established in 1967, WIPO is a self-funding specialized UN agency that works for the development of a balanced and effective international intellectual property system and to enable innovation and creativity for the benefit of all.

It currently has 191 member States and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland.

 source: UN News Centre
Kategorien: english

Inclusive Cities for Sustainable Families

27. April 2018 - 16:23

The United Nations through its Secretary General, has encouraged to promote “data collection and research on family issues and the impact of public policy on families” [A/70/61-E/2015/3], because “the very achievement of development goals depends on how well families are empowered to contribute to the achievement of those goals” [A/66/62-E/2011/4].

The project ‘Inclusive Cities for Sustainable Families’ takes note of the call, and seeks to highlight – for policymakers, practitioners and the general public – how the role of the family, and policies for families, can contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. With that objetctive, a global family expert group from Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania and America has developed pragmatic processes and procedures to assess how family policies work to affect different social progress goals (as defined in the Sustainable Development Goalss) in different parts of the world; how the actions of non-government actors working in support of families contribute to the issue; and family attributes at household or national level impact on the effectiveness of the previously identified family interventions.

The final report for the project follows a structure according to the goals and targets selected from the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Its structure shows the progress done and the challenges ahead through these endeavors:

  • Portray the research process of each expert in each meeting
  • Address the challenges encountered to fulfill the objectives
  • Update the timeline information
  • Show current chapter’s outline
  • Suggest dissemination strategies

On 16th May 2018, a world presentation of the project results will be held at the UN Headquarters, during the 2018 annual observance of the International Day of Families. A roundtable discussion with audience participation is expected on the presentation. 3 issues will be discussed during the event:

  • Cross-cutting issues affecting family policy development for the achievement of SDG 1-5, 8 & 16
  • Family policies and gender perspective
  • Family well-being and development

Check out the registration information and other resources here.

Source: IFFD 

Kategorien: english

Empowering young women and girls to pursue careers in ICT

27. April 2018 - 15:40

International Girls in ICT Day was celebrated today, 26 April 2018, around the globe at thousands of events organized to inspire girls and young women to consider careers in the information and communication technology (ICT) sector.

The day is organized annually on the fourth Thursday in April by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the United Nations specialized agency for information and communications technologies (ICTs).

Since its inception, over 300,000 girls and young women have taken part in more than 9,000 celebrations of International Girls in ICT Day in 166 countries worldwide.

International Girls in ICT Day is an opportunity to encourage young women and girls to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

ICTs are a key driver of gender equality and women’s empowerment. With improved access to these transformative technologies, women and girls around the world can benefit from increased employment and business opportunities.

“ITU’s International Girls in ICT Day has become a global movement in which more girls and young women are learning about the wide range of fascinating opportunities ICT careers can offer,” said ITU Secretary-General Houlin Zhao. “In the coming years there will be numerous job opportunities for people equipped with relevant digital skills. It is essential that the public and private sectors, as well as academia, and civil society seize the momentum created by International Girls in ICT Day to leapfrog the number of girls pursuing careers in technology.”

ITU promotes the use of ICTs to ensure women and girls have the necessary skills and tools to fully exploit the benefits of today’s digital economy, and ITU encourages its membership to undertake yearlong activities to make girls and young women aware of job opportunities in the ICT sector as well as to develop their ICT skills.

“Each time we introduce more women to the world of ICTs, not only do we take one more step towards achieving gender equality, but we accelerate socio-economic development for all,” said Brahima Sanou, Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Development Bureau. “In many countries, we are starting to see International Girls in ICT Day initiatives moving from one-day events to sustained, on-going programmes to teach girls about ICTs throughout the year. Let’s make every day a Girls in ICT Day!”

Overview of some regional events organized to celebrate International Girls in ICT Day

Africa Region

In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, over 200 girls will take part in a celebration on 14 May 2018. The event will be preceded by a week-long SMS competition for girls. The event is organized by ITU in collaboration with UN Women, the United Nations Development Programme and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa and the African Union.

Americas Region

In Brasilia, Brazil, the day was celebrated at the “Universidade Nacional de Brasilia”. About 120 high school girls benefited from motivational talks given by women working in the ICT sector.

Arab States Region

In Palestine, girls drawn from different schools in Gaza have been taking part in a month-long ICT competition ahead of the Girls in ICT Day to be observed on 30 April at the University College of Applied Sciences. During the week leading up to the celebrations, the various teams will visit different technology companies and organizations to see how ICTs are being applied in different situations.

Asia-Pacific Region

In Thailand, the Ministry of Digital Economy and Society and ITU, in partnership with the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and CISCO conducted a training session attended by girls and young women on the use of ICTs in agriculture. More training sessions on “Agritech Using ICTs” are planned throughout the year to build digital skills amongst girls and young women.

European Region

In Bulgaria, over 70 schoolgirls from Sofia, will take part on 28 April in activities co-organized by ITU and the European Commission. Under the theme “Empowering Girls in the Digital Era”, the event will include a panel discussion by role models featuring high-level policy makers and speakers, including ITU Secretary-General Houlin Zhao and Bulgaria Vice-President Iliana Lotova.

At ITU Headquarters in Geneva, about 150 girls from local schools took part in an ICT fair where they participated in hand-on workshops showcasing different and practical aspects of digital technology and also met and interacted with women role models working in the ICT sector.

CIS Region

In the CIS Region, several academic institutions and organizations specializing in telecommunications and ICTs will organize activities to mark International Girls in ICT Day. During the events, girls and young women will be able to explore further career opportunities in the ICT sector, experience first-hand how ICTs are deployed to provide solutions for socio-economic development as well as meet and interact with women role models.

More information about the International Girls in ICT Day.

Source: ITU

Kategorien: english

Youth ‘the missing peace’ to tackling global challenges

26. April 2018 - 23:24

Jayathma Wickramanayake, the UN Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, underlined three critical areas – supporting youth’s peace efforts; prioritizing their political participation; and partnering with them.

“I will not ask you to let young people lead, as they are already leading. But they need inclusive and safe spaces and enabling environments to succeed,” she said, speaking at an open debate of the Security Council on youth, peace and security.

“Recognize [their work], fund it, scale it up, protect it.”

Ms. Wickramanayake also called for dispelling misconceptions surrounding youth, citing studies that illustrate only a small minority of young people ever engage in violence.

Yet, she added, they face suspicions and undue restrictions, including when it comes to travelling across borders and many had difficulties in obtaining travel permits to be at today’s meeting.

“My generation represents promise – not peril. We should be seen as an asset – not a problem.”

In her remarks, Ms. Wickramanayake also called on all concerned to fully engage with young people in electoral processes and political party structures and not to consider them “too young to run” for Public Office.

Include young people in political, civic and economic life, she urged.

Do not demonize or patronize the youth – study author

Speaking alongside the UN youth envoy, Graeme Simpson, the lead author of ‘The missing peace: independent progress study on youth and peace and security,’ also called for tackling stereotypes, debunking assumptions and policy myths associated with the younger generation.

“It necessitates a new culture and new societal norms, that do not demonize, romanticize or patronize youth,” he said.

“The interests of young people and the work they do, naturally traverses the pillars of peace, development and human rights, and they make it clear that protection and prevention are inseparable.”

The open debate was convened by Peru in its capacity as the President of the Security Council for the month of April.

It comes ahead of a high-level meeting on peacebuilding and sustaining peace convened by the President of the General Assembly, 24-25 April, at UN Headquarters in New York.

Listen to the audio here.

Source: UN News Centre

Kategorien: english

Multi-stakeholder processes on energy leading up to SDG7

25. April 2018 - 22:07

Energy is crucial for achieving almost all of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), from its role in the eradication of poverty through advancements in health, education, water supply and industrialization, to combating climate change.

A new publication, “Accelerating SDG 7 achievement: Policy briefs in support of the first SDG7 review at the UN High-Level Political Forum 2018” has been launched by the SDG7 Technical Advisory Group in partnership with UN DESA. Review the UN DESA News Story and IISD Story for more details. The publication includes 27 Policy Briefs by over 50 organisations including from governments, the UN System, international organizations, civil society entities, business associations and other stakeholders. It proposes a new Global Agenda for Accelerated SDG7 Action as a clear roadmap towards achieving universal energy access by 2030 and maximizing its positive impact on other SDGs. The Briefs explore SDG7and its interlinkages with other SDGs and call for urgent action on energy to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. An accompanying presentation is available here.

Global SDG7 Conference

In February 2018 the Global SDG7 Conference was convened by UN DESA, UN ESCAP and the government of Thailand, in Bangkok, to prepare substantive input on review of SDG7 during the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) this July 2018. Together all stakeholders engaged in a dialogue that emphasized the integrated and cross-cutting nature of sustainable energy and its multiple roles in supporting the achievement of the SDGs. The Outcome Summary is available for review as well as photos from the Conference.

The 27 Policy Briefs serve as a direct outcome of the Global SDG7 Conference and will inform the discussions during the HLPF as well as in the preparation of Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) by Member States. The Briefs and Conference were made possible with generous support from Norway, Germany, The Netherlands, the European Commission, ENERGIA, Hivos, Republic of Korea through the United Nations Office for Sustainable Development, and China through the United Nations sub-trust fund for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,

Toward SDG7 Review at HLPF 2018

The HLPF is the main UN platform on sustainable development and plays a central role in the follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the global level. In 2018, it will meet from Monday, 9 July, to Wednesday, 18 July at UN in New York; including the last three days at ministerial level. Under the theme of “Transformation towards sustainable and resilient societies” it will include the review of:

Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all

Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss

The formal session to review SDG7 will take place on 10 July from 11:00 to 13:00.  The 2018 HLPF programme overview is here.

Side Events sponsored by Member States, UN system and other intergovernmental organizations, Major Groups and other accredited stakeholders will be held in the margins of the HLPF 2018. The deadline for submission of requests for side events is 30 April 2018. Please review the Guidelines for Organizers of Side Events.

In the coming months several global energy events are taking place leading up to the HLPF. These include the Regional Forums on Sustainable DevelopmentSustainable Energy for All ForumVienna Energy Forum, the Clean Energy Ministerial, and European Development Days.

Register for the Partnership Exchange

The Partnership Exchange is the United Nations annual global gathering for reviewing multi-stakeholder partnerships and voluntary commitments in supporting the implementation of the SDGs, organized in the margins of the HLPF. It utilizes an online commitment platform for registering partnerships for SDGs.  You are encouraged to register your initiatives that advance implementation of SDG7 and associated targets, reflecting inter-linkages between SDG7 and other SDGs. The most innovative initiatives will also have an opportunity to be featured at the Partnership Exchange.

More information about HLPF 2018 click here.

Source: UNDESA

Kategorien: english

Promoting the inclusion of young people through social protection

24. April 2018 - 16:37

Social protection is a potent policy tool to protect people from poverty throughout the life cycle. It can also reduce inequality and social exclusion. However, as the Report on the World Social Situation 2018 (United Nations, forthcoming) makes clear, access to social protection varies significantly depending on a person’s background or identity, including their age, race, and gender. This can limit its potential to promote inclusion.

In 2015, young people aged 15 to 24 years accounted for 1.2 billion, or 16 per cent, of the world’s population (United Nations, 2017). Creating a social and economic environment that enables these young people to thrive in adulthood—including through pathways to decent work—is central to promoting their inclusion. But when opportunities for work are lacking, social protection can play a vital role in addressing exclusionary risks. Unfortunately, the specific needs of young people are rarely the focus of social protection systems, even though failing to invest in youth can have long-term implications for society.

Risks and disadvantages faced by young people The transition to adulthood can be a time of enormous opportunities—but also risks. Young people are three times more likely than adults to be unemployed (ILO, 2017a). And even if they do find a job, young people are over-represented in so-called vulnerable employment, often in the informal sector. Youth unemployment and under-employment have a high cost for society, in terms of lost human and productive potential and decreased fiscal revenues. They also undermine trust in the political and economic system and social cohesion and stability. Young people are often targeted by political movements that channel their desire for change and the lack of other options for civic engagement into civil disobedience and violence. Finally, young people face risks as they make other important decisions about leaving home and school, accessing skills training or further education, becoming sexually active, getting married and starting a family.

Download the full report of Promoting the inclusion of young people through social protection.

More Social Development Briefs.

Source: UNDESA DSPD 

Kategorien: english

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