Sie sind hier

DIE

Newsfeed DIE abonnieren DIE
Publikationen des German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS)
Aktualisiert: vor 3 Stunden 34 Minuten

Zeitenwende – Investing in competencies for transnational cooperation

18. November 2022 - 14:22

Russia’s attack on Ukraine has put into sometimes sharp relief the different perspectives of inter- and transnational cooperation. The violation of the rules-based order after WWII caused shockwaves, specifically in Europe. Experiences of partners in, say, Africa or Asia with this international order historically differ from the European ones; consequently, even if we might share values, perspectives differ. While inter- and transnational cooperation is more needed than ever, cooperation takes place across deepened ideological rifts and conflicting material interests. This is a politically more complex world.

We thus need better structures for transnational knowledge cooperation and individuals who have the skills to navigate unchartered and sometimes choppy waters and address tensions in these difficult times. Training of actors is thus crucial, as a "Zeitenwende" is characterised by the absence of "business as usual". Consequently, building and strengthening competencies of staff (and partners) to enable them to (re)act to and shape new and challenging situations matters largely for transnational cooperation.

Kategorien: Ticker

Coherent peace policy: it’s the content that counts

18. November 2022 - 13:28

That inter-ministerial competition doesn’t make for more successful foreign policy is a commonplace observation. However, it isn’t enough that all parts of government pull together, they must move together in the right direction.

Kategorien: Ticker

Learning from each other: the multifaceted potential for partnership between the Republic of Korea and Germany

18. November 2022 - 10:49

Although geographically distant, there is considerable convergence in the development policy priorities of Germany and the Republic of Korea (hereafter: Korea) – and indeed scope for cooperation between them. Whereas Germany was a founding member of the international development cooperation system as we know it today, Korea is a recent member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and its Development Assistance Committee (DAC) and both an important former recipient as well as a current provider of development cooperation.
The development policies and operations of Germany and Korea are confronted by a challenging global geopolitical and economic setting, as well as a worrying decline in human development globally. Both countries are being challenged to respond to this changing setting and to communicate such changes effectively in their contributions towards advancing sustainable development at home and through international cooperation.
Both countries have seen considerable increases in their official development assistance (ODA) budgets during the past decade, with Korea expected to continue its gradual growth path, whereas Germany may face challenges to consolidate its ODA budget – notwithstanding its important position as the only G7 member that has reached the target of providing 0.7 per cent of its gross national income (GNI) as ODA.
This policy brief describes and discusses the German and Korean systems for setting development policy.

Kategorien: Ticker

Economic effects of FDI: how important is rising market concentration?

16. November 2022 - 11:31

Many governments adopt policies and actively compete to attract foreign direct investment (FDI). Particularly for lower-income countries, attracting FDI – and with it the benefits of cooperating with multi-national enterprises (MNEs) – is a promising strategy for participating in global supply chains and increasing local firm productivity. However, empirical findings show contrasting effects and there is heated debate over FDI’s advantages and drawbacks. The current trend to rising market concentration also begs the question: Have FDI effects changed in recent years?
This Policy Brief aims to address these questions by studying FDI and what the apparent growth in market concentration implies. Although foreign investment theoretically raises productivity, creates employment and offers many other benefits, the empirical evidence is not unequivocal. Initial coarse country-level data found that receptivity to FDI raises the host country’s economic growth. But later research used more detailed sector data and showed ambiguous effects (Görg & Greenaway, 2004). New microdata confirm that FDI effects are differential: Not all workers and households benefit equally. They also showcase the different ways in which MNEs and FDI benefit firms, workers and households in host countries. Recently, superstar firms, which capture large shares of industries and thereby increase market con-centration, have emerged. Linked to reduced national economic dynamism and evident in global markets, the rise of superstar firms could negatively impact on FDI effects. They differ from MNE competition effects and confer market power so that MNEs can determine prices and wages. This trend toward rising market concentration is observed across multiple sectors and has several possible causes, such as technological and legal factors.
A literature survey reveals a lack of evidence about how rising concentration in global markets is affecting FDI gains. However, other evidence suggests that the positive spillovers to domestic firms may well be lower, with higher market concentration negatively affecting wages and employment. The following takeaways can be derived for policy-making:
1. Integrate competition policy: Competition effects should be considered when evaluating FDI and policies should be introduced to ensure competitive practises after FDI entry.
2. Improve monitoring: Collect data on competi-tive forces and how they change when MNEs enter host economies.
3. Absorb regressive effects: Introduce social benefits to counter the potential mixed effects of FDI and MNE market power.

Kategorien: Ticker

Economic effects of FDI: how important is rising market concentration?

16. November 2022 - 11:31

Many governments adopt policies and actively compete to attract foreign direct investment (FDI). Particularly for lower-income countries, attracting FDI – and with it the benefits of cooperating with multi-national enterprises (MNEs) – is a promising strategy for participating in global supply chains and increasing local firm productivity. However, empirical findings show contrasting effects and there is heated debate over FDI’s advantages and drawbacks. The current trend to rising market concentration also begs the question: Have FDI effects changed in recent years?
This Policy Brief aims to address these questions by studying FDI and what the apparent growth in market concentration implies. Although foreign investment theoretically raises productivity, creates employment and offers many other benefits, the empirical evidence is not unequivocal. Initial coarse country-level data found that receptivity to FDI raises the host country’s economic growth. But later research used more detailed sector data and showed ambiguous effects (Görg & Greenaway, 2004). New microdata confirm that FDI effects are differential: Not all workers and households benefit equally. They also showcase the different ways in which MNEs and FDI benefit firms, workers and households in host countries. Recently, superstar firms, which capture large shares of industries and thereby increase market con-centration, have emerged. Linked to reduced national economic dynamism and evident in global markets, the rise of superstar firms could negatively impact on FDI effects. They differ from MNE competition effects and confer market power so that MNEs can determine prices and wages. This trend toward rising market concentration is observed across multiple sectors and has several possible causes, such as technological and legal factors.
A literature survey reveals a lack of evidence about how rising concentration in global markets is affecting FDI gains. However, other evidence suggests that the positive spillovers to domestic firms may well be lower, with higher market concentration negatively affecting wages and employment. The following takeaways can be derived for policy-making:
1. Integrate competition policy: Competition effects should be considered when evaluating FDI and policies should be introduced to ensure competitive practises after FDI entry.
2. Improve monitoring: Collect data on competi-tive forces and how they change when MNEs enter host economies.
3. Absorb regressive effects: Introduce social benefits to counter the potential mixed effects of FDI and MNE market power.

Kategorien: Ticker

Flood risk perceptions and future migration intentions of Lagos residents

15. November 2022 - 15:00

Coastal communities across the world face intense and frequent flooding due to the rise in extreme rainfall and storm surges associated with climate change. Adaptation is therefore crucial to manage the growing threat to coastal communities and cities. This case study focuses on Lagos, Nigeria, one of the world's largest urban centers where rapid urbanization, poor urban planning, degrading infrastructure, and inadequate preparedness compounds flood vulnerability. We situate flood risk perceptions within the context of climate-induced mobilities in Lagos, which no study has done, filling a necessary knowledge gap. Furthermore, we apply a unique approach to flood risk perception and its linkage to migration, by using three measures of risk – affect, probability, and consequence, as opposed to a singular measure. Results show that the affect measure of flood risk perception is significantly higher than probability and consequence measures. Furthermore, flood risk perception is shaped by prior experiences with flooding and proximity to hazard. The effect of proximity on risk perception differs across the three measures. We also found that flood risk perceptions and future migration intentions are positively correlated. These results demonstrate the usefulness of using multiple measures to assess flood risk perceptions, offering multiple pathways for targeted interventions and flood risk communication.

Kategorien: Ticker

„Moral muss man sich leisten können!“

14. November 2022 - 9:00

Bonn, 14.11.2022. Politik steckt voller Zielkonflikte und Widersprüchlichkeiten. Die Liste der autokratisch geführten Länder, in die hochrangige deutsche Regierungsvertreter*innen in den vergangenen Monaten – in außergewöhnlichen Krisenzeiten –  Auslandsreisen unternahmen, erfuhr einige öffentliche Kritik. Ziel vieler dieser Reisen ist es, die Energiesicherheit für Deutschland zu erhöhen – nicht zuletzt durch Abkommen, die den Zugang zu weiteren fossilen Energien erreichen sollen.

Selbstredend sind vertiefte Beziehungen zu Autokratien und Abkommen über die Lieferung neuer fossiler Energien nicht Teil einer beabsichtigten Politik. Ganz im Gegenteil: Die Bundesregierung hat sich das Ende des fossilen Zeitalters und eine wertegeleitete internationale Politik zum Ziel gesetzt. „Unsere Außen-, Sicherheits- und Entwicklungspolitik werden wir wertebasiert (…) aufstellen“, heißt es im Koalitionsvertrag. Angesichts dieses Anspruchs werden Zielkonflikte umso deutlicher – etwa mit Blick auf die im Oktober genehmigten Waffenlieferungen nach Saudi-Arabien.

Widersprüchlichkeiten in der Politik der Handelnden aufzuzeigen, ist meist nicht besonders schwierig. Dies lässt sich durchweg für frühere Bundesregierungen konstatieren. Dies gilt umso mehr seitdem Russlands Aggressionspolitik kurzfristig einschneidende Veränderungen erforderlich gemacht hat. Zugleich ist eine Bundesregierung, die gerade die Wertebasierung in den Mittelpunkt stellt, besonders herausgefordert.

Entwicklungspolitik ist stärker als andere Politikfelder durch Werte begründet. Humanismus, christliche Werte, Fragen der internationalen Gerechtigkeit und andere Werte spielen eine vergleichsweise hervorgehobene Rolle. Werte schließen auch Interessen nicht aus und umgekehrt – zumal beide Begriffe nicht auf absolut klar abgrenzbaren Konzepten beruhen.

Entwicklungspolitik muss sich in fundamentalen Umbruchzeiten verändern. Insofern ist gerade die Frage nach dem Verhältnis von Werten und Interessen wichtig. Die Frage ist prinzipieller Natur, sie ist aber ebenso als Kompass für konkrete Entscheidungen von enormer Bedeutung. Muss Entwicklungspolitik nach Jahren der Beschäftigung mit Lieferketten neben den Produktionsbedingungen in Entwicklungsländern strategische Aspekte der Rohstoff- und Energieversorgung für Deutschland stärker in den Blick nehmen? Wie soll unter diesen Vorzeichen entwicklungspolitische Zusammenarbeit mit autokratischen Regimen aussehen?

Folgende Punkte sollten für eine Positionierung berücksichtigt werden:

Erstens, wertebasierte Politik ist für internationale Glaubwürdigkeit unmittelbar relevant: Die Annahme, Werte könnten in „Schönwetterzeiten“ Platz finden, hätten aber in Krisenzeiten keinen Bestand, verkennt die Rolle von Vertrauen, Glaubwürdigkeit und Transparenz in den internationalen Beziehungen. Die Debatten bei den Vereinten Nationen zur russischen Aggressionspolitik haben deutlich gemacht, wie Doppelstandards (etwa mit Blick auf die Irak-Militärintervention von 2003) oder ausbleibende Reformen bei Global-Governance-Strukturen unmittelbar (deutsche) Sicherheitsinteressen berühren. Entwicklungspolitik kann dabei ein entscheidendes Politikfeld in der Kooperation mit dem Globalen Süden sein.

Zweitens, viele Debatten sind unterkomplex, weil sie monothematisch geführt werden: Globale Herausforderungen – angefangen von Ungleichheit über Klimawandel bis hin zu Legitimität von politischer Herrschaft – sind jeweils schon für sich genommen schwierig und lassen sich oft anhand von dichotomen Mustern (Autokratien versus Demokratien; „Norden“ versus. „Süden“ etc.) nicht sinnvoll erfassen. Für Entwicklungspolitik ist es wichtig, mit dieser Vielschichtigkeit umzugehen. Schlicht nur auf die „Bedürftigkeit“ eines Landes zu schauen (unabhängig etwa von der Bedeutung von Regierungsführung für bestehende Probleme) wäre eine solche Verkürzung, ebenso wie ausschließlich Regierungsführung als einziges Kriterium für die Auswahl von Kooperationsbeziehungen zu setzen. Besonders sichtbar werden Zielkonflikte mit Blick auf China, wo eine Vielzahl u.a. von wirtschaftlichen, sicherheitsrelevanten und menschenrechtsbezogenen Themen zusammenkommen.

Drittens, Zielkonflikte existieren und sollten transparent diskutiert werden: Für Entwicklungspolitik und andere Politikfelder gilt, dass es einen Unterschied macht, ob und wie Widersprüchlichkeiten thematisiert werden. Der Abwägungs- und Priorisierungsprozess macht Politik aus.

Politik basiert im besten Fall auf langfristigen Zielen und dazu passenden Strategien. Die multiplen Krisen zwingen dazu, in Zeiten von grundlegenden Unsicherheiten, Politiken in Form von Strategien zu formulieren – selbst wenn dies angesichts rasch veränderlicher Grundlagen extrem schwierig ist. Dies zeigt sich mit Blick auf die Vorbereitung der ersten deutschen nationalen Sicherheitsstrategie und ähnlich auf die angekündigte China-Strategie der Bundesregierung. Neben dem Bedarf an längerfristiger Orientierung sollte die Aufmerksamkeit auf konkrete Mechanismen zur „Aushandlung“ von Zielkonflikten innerhalb und vor allem zwischen Politikfeldern liegen. Ein besseres Schnittstellenmanagement wäre in der deutschen Politik ein wichtiger Schritt, mit Zielkonflikten umzugehen. Die anstehenden Strategie-Dokumente sollten daran gemessen werden, ob sie zu einer solchen verbesserten Politikkohärenz einen Beitrag leisten können.

Kategorien: Ticker

Transnational cities alliances and their role in policy-making in sustainable urban development in the European Arctic

13. November 2022 - 21:07

Non-governmental actors perform an important role in the functioning of democracy. However, they are often perceived as being less tied to its principles as they are not fully controlled by democratic procedures and institutions. This chapter focuses on transnational alliances between cities in the European Arctic as a special kind of non-governmental actors. Different to other non-governmental actors, the collaborating actors are here elected representatives. But do such alliances have a greater authority in Arctic politics? The purpose of this chapter is twofold: First, it introduces the Nordic model of local self-government to discuss public participation in Arctic cities and the possibilities and hindrances of stakeholders to inform policy-making processes in the context of Arctic urban development. Second, this chapter seeks to assess in how far city-alliances – like the Arctic Mayors’ Forum (AMF) – as a specific kind of non-governmental actors have a unique say in Arctic politics at the national, regional, and local levels. It further investigates in how far such alliances can be perceived as actors that are crucial to enhance more coherent policy-making in the Arctic. This chapter is based on a transdisciplinary approach that considers legal challenges and the power/knowledge nexus in policy-making.

Kategorien: Ticker

Iraks Suche nach dem Gesellschaftsvertrag: Ein Ansatz zur Förderung gesellschaftlichen Zusammenhalts und staatlicher Resilienz

10. November 2022 - 8:49

Zweck dieser Studie ist es, die Beziehungen zwischen Staat und Gesellschaft im Irak durch die konzeptionelle Linse des Gesellschaftsvertrages zu betrachten. Aus diesem Zugang können sich zudem potenzielle Betätigungsfelder für außenstehende Akteure ableiten lassen – wie zum Beispiel die deutsche Entwicklungszusammenarbeit (EZ) und die Technische Zusammenarbeit (TZ). Sie können dazu beitragen, die Neuverhandlung dieses angespannten Beziehungsgeflechts zu unterstützen. Dieser Analyse liegt das Verständnis eines Gesellschaftsvertrages zugrunde, welches das Verhältnis zwischen Regierten und Regierung primär als Verhandlungsprozess betrachtet und sich beispielsweise entlang der sogenannten 3Ps (participation/Beteili-gung, provision/öffentliche Güter und protection/Schutz-Rechtsstaat) operationalisieren lässt. Insofern fließen in das Verständnis zeitgenössische Ansätze ein, aber auch die klassischen Überlegungen der französischen und angelsächsischen Denker, welche die individuelle Freiheitseinschränkung im Gegenzug zu staatlich gewährleisteter Rechtssicherheit betonen.
Die Studie teilt sich dazu in drei Abschnitte. In einem ersten Schritt werden die schwache Staatlichkeit und die Zerrüttung der Gesellschaft im heuristischen Kontext des Gesellschaftsvertrages erörtert. Des Weiteren wird die Rolle externer Akteure bei der Entwicklung des Irak nach 2003 beschrieben. Dabei werden das politische Proporzsystem und dessen gesellschaftspolitische Implikationen näher beleuchtet. Im dritten Teil werden als Synthese der ersten beiden Abschnitte Überlegungen angestellt, wie externe Akteure aus der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit einen Beitrag zur friedlichen Ausverhandlung des dysfunktionalen irakischen Gesellschaftsvertrages leisten können. Diese Überlegungen vollziehen sich vor dem systemischen Hintergrund eines Rentenstaates mit hybrider Regierungsführung und sie nehmen sowohl die äußerst brüchige Beziehung zwischen Regierung und Bevölkerung in den Blick als auch die bislang tendenziell gescheiterten externen Interventionen. So zeigen sich die Schwachpunkte des über weite Strecken dysfunktionalen irakischen Gesellschaftsvertrages, die gleichzeitig Ansatzpunkte liefern, ihn zu verbessern und neu zu verhandeln.

Kategorien: Ticker

The impact of carbon taxation and revenue redistribution on poverty and inequality

9. November 2022 - 14:00

The global policy debate on just transitions is concerned with how to achieve a socially just and acceptable transition toward a climate-neutral and climate-resilient global economy. At the core of this debate is the assumption that efforts to combat environmental threats will not succeed unless combined with measures to reduce poverty and inequality. Our research explores the potential of carbon fiscal reforms, combining a carbon tax of levels deemed appropriate to achieve climate targets and the transfer of the revenues raised to vulnerable households.
The current energy and cost-of-living crisis shows the importance of protecting the poorest and most vulnerable households from price increases. It also shows the difficulty of achieving short- and long-term policy priorities. Despite the current spikes in energy prices, carbon fiscal reforms can achieve both social and environmental goals through simultaneously decreasing emissions and reducing poverty and inequality. They should act as an effective enabler of just transitions.
Carbon fiscal reform can avoid some environmental impacts by incentivising reductions in emissions. Carbon pricing has been increasingly advocated and is now at the centre of policy debates, including the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP) and the recent German presidency of the world’s leading industrial nations (G7). But carbon fiscal reforms can also be used to raise revenue from carbon pricing instruments to offset the negative effects of higher prices on poorer households as well as further reaching distributional targets and poverty alleviation. Climate targets are negotiated every year, including at COP, hence it is critical to re-evaluate and improve estimates of the distributional impacts of climate policies such as carbon pricing.
Public acceptability of climate policies is key to their implementation, but it depends to a large extent on the perceived fairness of such policies. Recycling revenues from carbon taxes directly back to vulnerable households is likely to gain the approval of a large number of people, especially in low-income countries where the high proportion of the population involved in the informal economy means that lowering income tax does not benefit the poorest and most vulnerable sections of society. But the targeting of these direct transfers needs careful consideration.
Here, we assess the impact on poverty and inequality of a global carbon tax and national redistribution of revenues to vulnerable households. We look at different options for such redistribution, including a lump sum payment, the use of current social assistance programmes, and an expansion of social assistance following COVID-19.
We find that a carbon tax of US$50/tCO2 without revenue redistribution could increase global extreme poverty, but the redistribution of revenue from such a carbon tax could substantially reduce poverty by between 16% and 27% (110 to 190 million people), and reduce inequality (the average Gini coefficient would decline by between 4% and 8%), depending on the scenario. This shows that the way in which revenue from a carbon tax is redistributed greatly affects its impact, underlining the importance of policy design and targeting mechanisms. The recycling of revenues should also take into account the specific political economy of a country and consider international transfers.
These findings provide policy makers with a strong basis for informing discussions, starting off with those at COP27, in which ambitious climate targets and just transition should both remain central goals in the context of the ongoing international energy crisis.

Kategorien: Ticker

Connections that matter: how the quality of governance institutions may be the booster shot we need to reduce poverty and inequality

8. November 2022 - 14:07

Current global crises are complex. Tackling issues separately or in sequence will be futile. Transformation can happen only when multiple issues are tackled at the same time. To help do so, a new study by UNDP’s Oslo Governance Centre (OGC) and the German Development Institute (DIE/GDI) investigates how aspects of SDG 16 that are considered critical features of governance institutions – transparency, accountability and inclusion – help or hinder progress on key dimensions of SDG 1 on poverty and SDG 10 on inequality. The study is the first attempt to consolidate evidence on this link and fills a gap in the existing literature on how different SDGs can reinforce each other.
Based on a scoping literature review of 400+ academic papers, the study finds empirical evidence from across the globe that investing in accountable, transparent and inclusive governance can boost the reduction of poverty and inequality. For example, in election years, social benefits are better targeted to those with low incomes; reducing corruption is positively correlated with access to education and improved literacy rates; and civil society engagement enables the provision of health care access. It offers initial policy insights on why, how and with whom national actors can use the employed methodology to identify, prioritize and sequence governance policies with ‘booster effects’ in their own country.

Kategorien: Ticker

Decarbonising cities: assessing governance approaches for transformative change

8. November 2022 - 13:08

While cities are important emitters of greenhouse gases (GHG), they are also vulnerable to the impacts of climate change; at the same time they constitute innovation hubs for climate action. For cities to fulfil their potential for global climate action, a thorough understanding of the governance of transformative change towards the decarbonisation of cities is necessary.
This study asks: Which governance approaches facilitate successful transformative change towards zero carbon in cities? It specifically addresses the three key aspects stakeholder involvement, financing, and impact assessment, and looks at how they contribute to transformative change – particularly to the dimensions CO2 reduction, the dynamics of transformation, and acceptance by citizens.
The empirical analysis is based on a mixed methods approach. An international survey involving city government officials of cities that are proactive in the fight against climate change was conducted in order to obtain an overview of socio-ecological transformation paths. In addition to this macro-level approach, in-depth case studies of three cities that are widely regarded as proactive on climate action in their respective world regions – Bonn, Quito and Cape Town – provide complementary insights.
The survey data show a generally positive tendency in the way local governments approach GHG emission reduction activities. Most of the participating cities engage in the mainstreaming of policies to address climate change in local decision-making and have established climate action plans and emission reduction targets; however, on actual climate action and the reduction of emissions, the picture is more mixed.
While stakeholder involvement is generally considered a key success factor in the survey responses and in the three case-study cities, stakeholders were seldom involved in a truly inclusive and cooperative way. While Bonn has gradually expanded citizen engagement, in Quito relations between the local government and stakeholder groups have often been short-term and project-bound, while a close connection between city government and academic institutions has been established in Cape Town.
In terms of finance, cities mostly rely on traditional financing sources such as intergovernmental transfers, local taxes and fees, as well as international grants to cities of the Global South. Additional funding through the generation of local revenues or market-based finance mechanisms is less widespread. Both Quito and Cape Town depend heavily on external funding from international organisations and donors, along with central government transfers, which are less relevant in Bonn. While building the metro is absorbing finances for additional climate action in Quito, perverse incentives exist in South Africa where cities receive revenues from re-selling fossil fuel-based energy to consumers. Bonn has recently started to experiment with a sustainability budget to align budgeting with sustainability and climate goals.
As far as impact assessment is concerned, most cities in the survey including the three case-study cities collect relevant data. However, systematic impact assessment or the incorporation of lessons learned from monitoring and evaluation into policy occur less frequently.
Despite its limitations, this study contributes to the theoretical and empirical discussions in the field of transformative urban governance by suggesting a conceptual framework for dimensions of success for transformative change, by combining survey and case study-based data, and by looking at finances and impact assessment which are two important governance dimensions that are not frequently investigated.

Kategorien: Ticker

Have the tables turned? What to expect from Kenya’s new “Hustler” President William Ruto

8. November 2022 - 10:06

Kenya had awaited the presidential elections held on August 9, 2022 with bated breath. The elections were won by William Ruto, who defeated opponent Raila Odinga by just a few percentage points. Ruto succeeds Uhuru Kenyatta, who leaves office having served his two permitted terms. This Spotlight analyzes the reasons for Ruto’s success, and, reflecting on his political career, discusses what can be expected from his presidency. We argue that both his success and his career have been strongly influenced by Kenya’s political history and the power structures of political alliances—especially in the context of previous elections.

Kategorien: Ticker

Das Versprechen, etwas für Natur und Klima zu tun, ist einfach, glaubwürdiges Handeln schwieriger

7. November 2022 - 10:52

Bonn, 07.11.2022. Ägypten bezeichnet das hochrangige Segment der UN-Klimakonferenz 2022 (COP27) in Sharm El Sheikh als „Klima-Umsetzungsgipfel“ und betont damit, dass die nationalen Klimapläne (NDCs) rasch umgesetzt werden müssen. Die derzeitigen Zusagen der Regierungen bleiben jedoch weit hinter dem zurück, was sie ursprünglich versprochen haben. Eine Umsetzung allein dieser Zusagen wäre gleichbedeutend mit der Aufgabe des erklärten Anspruchs, die globale Erwärmung auf 1,5°C zu begrenzen. Sich ausschließlich auf die Umsetzung von Klimaschutzmaßnahmen zu konzentrieren, könnte zudem zu Zielkonflikten mit anderen Aspekten der nachhaltigen Entwicklung führen, einschließlich des Schutzes und der Wiederherstellung der Natur.

Die Regierungen und andere Akteure müssen über die bloße Umsetzung der bisherigen Zusagen hinausgehen und ihre Ambitionen erhöhen. Auf der letztjährigen Klimakonferenz in Glasgow (COP26) wurde eine noch nie dagewesene Zahl von Unternehmen, Städten und anderen nichtstaatlichen und subnationalen Akteuren mobilisiert. Sie verpflichteten sich freiwillig zur Klimaneutralität (Race to Zero), zur Mobilisierung von Finanzmitteln (Glasgow Financial Action for Net Zero, GFANZ) und zum Aufbau von Widerstandsfähigkeit in gefährdeten Gemeinschaften (Race to Resilience). Für die Regierungen bietet sich eine enorme Chance, den Ehrgeiz dieser Akteure zur Senkung der Emissionen, zur Mobilisierung von Finanzmitteln und zum Aufbau von Anpassungsfähigkeiten zu nutzen. Und doch haben nur eine Handvoll Regierungen (fünf Prozent) in ihren NDCs auf freiwillige nichtstaatliche und subnationale Maßnahmen verwiesen (UNFCCC 2022).

Es ist verständlich, dass die Regierungen das Potenzial der nichtstaatlichen und subnationalen Akteure nur zögerlich erkannt haben. Große Versprechungen zu machen ist einfach, glaubwürdige Maßnahmen umzusetzen ist eine andere Sache. Und selbst wenn nichtstaatliche und subnationale Akteure ihre Versprechen einhalten würden, bräuchten Regierungen verlässliche Daten und Analysen, um ihren Beitrag einschätzen zu können.

Ein wichtiger Schritt zur Bereitstellung solcher Daten und Analysen ist die Veröffentlichung des Berichts "Global Climate Action 2022: how have international initiatives delivered, and what more is possible" des German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS), der Radboud University, dem NewClimate Institute, der University of Oxford, der Utrecht University und dem DataDriven Envirolab at UNC Chapel Hill. In dem Bericht wird der Beitrag von mehr als 600 Initiativen zur Dekarbonisierung und Klimaresilienz bewertet. Eine wichtige Erkenntnis ist die Tatsache, dass mehr als die Hälfte der großen Klimainitiativen, die seit 2014 auf UN-Klimakonferenzen und -Gipfeln ins Leben gerufen wurden, nicht die notwendigen Verhaltensänderungen oder Verbesserungen bei Umweltindikatoren (einschließlich der Reduzierung von Treibhausgasemissionen) bewirken. Darüber hinaus schneiden Initiativen, die in erster Linie auf den Aufbau von Resilienz und Anpassungsfähigkeit abzielen, schlechter ab als Initiativen zur Eindämmung des Klimawandels. Dies ist ein Problem für nachhaltige Entwicklung im weiteren Sinne. Am Race to Zero haben sich beispielsweise mehr als 8000 Unternehmen, 500 Investoren, 1000 Städte und 1000 Bildungseinrichtungen beteiligt, die sich verpflichtet haben, bis spätestens 2050 “Netto Null- Kohlenstoffemissionen zu erreichen. Die Verwendung von Kohlenstoffkompensationen, z. B. durch groß angelegte Baumpflanzungen, könnte jedoch andere Aspekte der nachhaltigen Entwicklung beeinträchtigen. Eine ausschließliche Konzentration auf die Emissionsreduzierung ist daher keine Option: Netto-Null-Verpflichtungen müssen mit dem Schutz und der Wiederherstellung natürlicher Ökosysteme in Einklang gebracht werden.

Da in diesem Jahr sowohl die UN-Klimakonferenz als auch die UN-Biodiversitätskonferenz stattfinden, bietet die COP27 eine wichtige Gelegenheit, Natur- und Klimaschutzmaßnahmen zu integrieren. So wird IDOS zusammen mit dem Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research an der York University, der Zoological Society of London, der Sociedade de Pesquisa em Vida Selvagem e Educação Ambiental (SPVS) und der Boticário Group Foundation ein offizielles Side-Event auf der COP27 ausrichten, um zu diskutieren, wie naturbasierte Klimamaßnahmen in Städten gleichzeitig die Natur und die Gesundheit des Planeten schützen und wiederherstellen und gleichzeitig zur Erreichung der Klimaziele beitragen können. Solche Überlegungen zwischen Forscher*innen, politischen Entscheidungstragenden und Praktiker*innen sind der Schlüssel, um einseitige Klimaschutzmaßnahmen zu verhindern und Kompromisse mit der Natur und der Gesundheit des Planeten zu vermeiden.

Sander Chan ist assoziierter Wissenschaftler am German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS), Assistenzprofessor am Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Nijmegen School of Management an der Radboud University und Principal Researcher in der Synergies of Planetary Health Research Initiative & Lab, Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research.

Idil Boran ist assoziierte Wissenschaftlerin am German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS) und Professorin für Applied Environmental Governance and Public Policy an der Faculty of Liberal and Professional Studies, York University.  An der York University leitet Boran die Synergies of Planetary Health Research Initiative & Lab am Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research und fungiert als stellvertretende Direktorin von CIFAL York.

Andrew Denault ist wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am German Institute of Development and Sustainability (IDOS).

Kategorien: Ticker

China's expanding engagement with the United Nations development pillar: the selective long-term approach of a programme country superpower

7. November 2022 - 10:45

The People’s Republic of China’s expanding influence in the United Nations (UN) has become a defining feature of today’s world politics. This study provides insights into China’s expanding role in the UN development pillar. We find that China has become an increasingly visible player over the last two decades as its funding for, staff representation in and diplomatic engagement with UN development work have expanded. Relative to the financial and political resources at its disposal, however, China’s engagement has largely remained moderate and selective. The thematic priorities and selected arenas China has focused on include rural development, big data and South-South and triangular cooperation. Overall, China appears to be taking an increasingly assertive and long-term approach towards changing some of the traditional contours of UN development work. Attempts to enshrine Chinese concepts in UN resolutions and the Global Development Initiative, for instance, seem to be directed at building the foundation for development multilateralism with Chinese characteristics. By doing so, China can make use of an asset that Western member states do not have at their disposal: the combination of its roles as a superpower and a UN programme country. China has capitalised on this duality to expand ties with the UN, notably through South-South cooperation support schemes. While many Western powers approach UN development organisations as project implementers, China has UN entities act as brokers or facilitators for processes and initiatives that are more immediately relevant to Chinese interests. The study provides reflections on the implications of these findings and concludes with recommendations for addressing (contestations around) China’s expanding engagement with the UN development pillar.

Kategorien: Ticker

The social contract in Egypt, Lebanon and Tunisia: what do the people want?

4. November 2022 - 17:56

This article investigates the demand side of social contracts. It asks what people expect from their governments. Drawing on original, nationally representative surveys in Egypt, Tunisia and Lebanon, it explores popular preferences for the three possible government deliverables in social contracts: provision of social and economic services, protection from physical harm and political participation. Findings reveal that citizens expect governments to deliver all three ‘Ps’ (even if this costs a price), yet preferring provision over protection and participation if they have to prioritize. Findings do not show robust preferences among social groups identified by economic, gender, educational and communal differences.

Kategorien: Ticker

Just energy transition partnerships in the context of Africa-Europe relations: reflections from South Africa, Nigeria and Senegal

4. November 2022 - 16:17

Synthesis paper prepared by Ukȧmȧ: the Africa-Europe platform for sustainable

development thinkers

This paper presents the platform members’ analysis and discussion of three papers analysing JETP

discussions in South Africa, Nigeria and Senegal that were written by independent researchers

based in the countries concerned. For any feedback on or queries about this synthesis paper,

please contact Elisabeth.Hege@iddri.org

For more information about the Ukȧmȧ platform, see:

https://www.iddri.org/en/project/ukama-africa-europe-platform-sustainable-development-thinkers

Kategorien: Ticker

Security cooperation and partnership between Germany, Europe and the Indo-Pacific region: addressing new threats and vulnerabilities through the convening power approach

4. November 2022 - 13:03

Germany and the EU’s interests in the EU-ASEAN security cooperation are framed by the will to further strengthen multilateralism and rules-based regional political order that can help counterbalance China as well as help ease the China-US tension in the region.

Kategorien: Ticker

Bus rapid transit implementation in African cities: the case for a more incremental reform approach

4. November 2022 - 9:34

Self-regulated paratransit services have become the main means of public transport in African cities. The rapid implementation of bus rapid transit (BRT) in Bogotá and other Latin American cities has attracted the interest of African cities to reform the ubiquitous paratransit services to regulate the public transport sector and ensure mass transportation. The approach in African cities has mainly supported the incumbent paratransit operators to become operators of the new service in an incremental corridor-by-corridor manner. While this approach avoids incumbent operators' aggressive resistance, it has encountered low interest from the incumbent paratransit operators. Despite the need for a mass transport service like BRT, implementation in African cities has not achieved the expected outcomes. This article argues for a more incremental approach that follows the "reverse product life cycle" concept. The arguments are substantiated by evidence from paratransit reform studies in African cities. This new approach takes into consideration (1) the time required to improve the capacity and competence of national and sub-national governments and incumbent paratransit operators and (2) spreading the financial capital required for governments and incumbent operators. This new approach makes a case for public transport reform implementation institutions to avoid the difficult task of developing a new service in the form of BRT from the onset. Instead, the approach advocates for gradually improving the existing service until a new mass public transport service like BRT is eventually realised.

Kategorien: Ticker

Wie Open Science die globale Wissenskooperation revolutionieren kann

4. November 2022 - 9:04

Bonn, 04.11.2022. Wissen muss weltweit zugänglich sein, um die Krisen unserer Zeit – von Klima und Energie bis hin zu Gesundheit und Ernährungssicherheit – zu bekämpfen. Cloud-Server und satellitengestütztes Internet könnten umfänglichen Zugang ermöglichen. Neben technologischen Lösungen bedarf es jedoch politischen Willens, internationale Kooperationsstrukturen so auszurichten, dass sie die freie Verbreitung von Wissen nicht behindern.

Im Oktober 2003 riefen in der Berliner Erklärung Wissenschaftseinrichtungen weltweit dazu auf, offenen Zugang zu Wissen zu ermöglichen und die globale Forschungskooperation zu vertiefen. Heute sind diese Ideale Kernelemente des Open-Science-Konzepts, das freien Zugang zu wissenschaftlichem Wissen für jedermann fordert. Open Access, Open Data und Open Source Software sind Schlüsselinstrumente, um diese Vision zu verwirklichen, indem Daten, Software und Publikationen so auffindbar (findable), zugänglich (accessible), interoperabel und wiederverwendbar (reusable) (FAIR) wie möglich gehalten werden. Open Science zielt auch darauf ab, mehr gesellschaftliche Akteure in transparente Forschungs- und Publikationsprozesse einzubeziehen, Asymmetrien zwischen wissenschaftlichen Akteuren zu überwinden und Digitalisierung für die Umsetzung der Agenda 2030 für nachhaltige Entwicklung nutzbar zu machen, indem Wissenschaft als öffentliches Gut gefördert wird.

Was sind die Gründe dafür, dass fast zwei Jahrzehnte nach der Berliner Erklärung das Potenzial von Open Science noch nicht realisiert werden konnte?

Erstens sind markt- und innovationsbasierte Systeme zur Privilegierung von Wissen, wie Rechte an geistigem Eigentum (IPR), Patente und Abonnements für Zeitschriften und Bibliotheken, so strukturiert, dass Wissen exklusiv wird. Geistige Eigentumsrechte sind ein Hindernis für Gemeinschaften, Wissen zu lokalisieren und von Produkten zu profitieren. COVID-19-Impfstoffpatente sind nach wie vor umstritten, da sie die freie Weitergabe von Wissen über die Impfstoffherstellung verhindern. Der UNESCO-Wissenschaftsbericht 2021 stellt fest, dass „fünf kommerzielle Verlage für mehr als 50 % aller veröffentlichten Artikel verantwortlich sind und etwa 70 % der wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen immer noch nicht frei zugänglich sind“. Und das, obwohl es mehr Open-Access-Zeitschriften und -Repositorien gibt als je zuvor.

Zweitens erfordert der Zugang zu Wissen geeignete Infrastruktur. Wenn neue Forschungsergebnisse online verbreitet werden, aber nur 63 % der Weltbevölkerung Zugang zum Internet haben, werden zu viele Menschen von den Ideen, Datenbanken und Veröffentlichungen ausgeschlossen, die unsere Gesellschaften prägen. Eine angemessene Einbeziehung und Vertretung aller Teile der globalen Gemeinschaft ist so nicht möglich.

Drittens: Wenn Speicherorte von Wissen einer restriktiven Logik der Datenlokalisierung folgen, während Vereinbarungen für freien Datenfluss fehlen, ist Wissen an die Infrastruktur und Rechtsprechung derjenigen gebunden, die es produziert und zentralisiert haben. Dies setzt bestehende Asymmetrien fort und kann zu großen Problemen führen, wenn Regierungen den Internetzugang beschränken oder in nationalen Protektionismus verfallen.

Das „Öffnen“ von Wissenschaft und Wissen erfordert also politischen Willen, das Spannungsverhältnis zwischen wirtschaftlichen Innovationsanreizen und globalem Gemeinwohl zu gestalten. Investitionen in digitale Infrastruktur müssen sicherstellen, dass „offen“ auch „immer zugänglich“ bedeutet. Daten und Ergebnisse müssen im Rahmen des FAIR-Konzepts auch benutzerfreundlich sein. Die Kontrolle über Zugang und Verbreitung wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse durch den privaten Sektor muss minimiert werden. Vorabdrucke und transparente Peer-Review-Prozesse müssen gestärkt werden, ebenso wie die Einbeziehung indigenen Wissens und die Zusammenarbeit mit Forschungslaien (Citizen Science).

Die EU fördert ein Modell, das Wissenschaft als öffentliches Gut versteht. Open Research Europe bietet eine Plattform für Veröffentlichungen und Datensätze, Peer-Review, Archiv und Wissensindex zugleich. Es ist jedoch in erster Linie ein europäisches Modell. Um das Versprechen der Berliner Erklärung und von Open Science zu erfüllen, benötigen wir Partnerschaften zwischen Staaten und Forschungseinrichtungen, die sich zu einem „Open Research Global“-Ansatz verpflichten. Standardsetzer wie die UNESCO und die EU sowie Forschungsgemeinschaften wie Helmholtz und Leibniz unterstützen Open Science. Sie könnten den Anstoß für globale Partnerschaften geben. Auf diese Weise würde der Zugang zu Wissenschaft nicht nur besser mit Artikel 27 der Allgemeinen Erklärung der Menschenrechte in Einklang gebracht werden, der die Wissenschaft und ihre Ergebnisse zu einem öffentlichen Gut erklärt; wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse könnten auch effektiver zur Erreichung der globalen Nachhaltigkeitsziele beitragen und die Krisen unserer Zeit adressieren.

Kategorien: Ticker

Seiten