Sie sind hier

Women

Newsfeed Women abonnieren
Creating a just and sustainable future
Aktualisiert: vor 9 Stunden 33 Minuten

Reflections after HLPF, towards UNGA

12. September 2022 - 18:07

 

Recently, civil society groups have raised concerns about the very real possibilities that the SDGs will not be achieved until 2065, and that gender equality and women’s rights won’t be achieved for another 298 years.

Despite these alarming statistics, member states did little during July’s High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development to advance implementation–instead maintaining the status quo. The Women’s Major Group expresses disappointment in the 2022 HLPF discussions and outcome, and raises red flags about the lack of accountability, political will and meaningful partnerships that are hindering progress towards achieving the 2030 Agenda.

After our fierce feminist advocacy at the 2022 HLPF and with UNGA 77 fast approaching, the Women’s Major Group has released a statement with our key feminist demands and reflections as states and UN processes continue to fail to meet our needs and raise ambition in this moment of intersecting crises.

Read our full statement here.

The statement reflects our disappointment with HLPF 2022 and how we witnessed states barely holding the line on agreed language, the continued corporate capture of the UN, and a lack of accountability and ambition. The statement also offers our recommendations to truly transform the HLPF and sustainable development process into one that delivers on the promises of the 2030 Agenda.

Thank you to our members who worked on the statement Sachini Perera (RESURJ), Tetet Nera-Lauron (Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung) and Lindsay Bigda (WEDO) along with the WMG Secretariat team, and Suman Saurav (WEDO) for the summary graphics, and to all our members for their continued efforts towards a more just and equitable future.

The post Reflections after HLPF, towards UNGA appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

Feminists Demand End Of UN Women’s Partnership With Blackrock, Inc

1. September 2022 - 9:08

On 25 May 2022, UN Women announced a partnership with BlackRock, Inc “to cooperate in promoting the growth of gender lens investing”. BlackRock is the world’s largest investment firm, with deep ties to the fossil fuel and military industries. This announcement gravely highlights the corporate capture of the UN as well as the closed door process of drafting and signing these agreements, without transparency, public consultation, or the oversight of the feminist movements that UN Women should center and prioritize.

The collaboration between the two entities led to public outcry and feminist campaigning against the partnership. Over 500 women’s rights organizations, feminist activists and allies came together and signed an open letter urging UN Women to ‘immediately rescind and repudiate’ its partnership with BlackRock. The letter details BlackRock’s investments in industries that contribute to climate change and social instability, as well as the firm’s obstruction of measures to promote labor rights, corporate accountability for sexual harassment, and close gender pay gaps where it has shareholdings. The letter also points out that BlackRock also holds large amounts of external private debt in the Global South countries where it has resisted government requests to restructure or suspend repayments to accommodate national crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which affect public budgets to support women. A press release was issued regarding the same.

As a follow up action to the public letter, feminists organized the #BlockBlackRock virtual public online event on Tuesday 16 August to highlight why UN Women needs to rescind the partnership BlackRock and set standards for its private sector partnerships. Interpretation was available in French, Spanish, and Portuguese.  The 1.5 hour conversation included speakers from Mijente and the No Tech for ICE Campaign, SOMO, and Public Services International, as well as AWID and WEDO, and was moderated by feminist activist-intellectual Sanam Amin. The collaborative campaign has resulted in the end of the partnership between UN Women and BlackRock Inc. Climate activists hold a protest outside the BlackRock headquarters in New York City in May 2022. (ERIK MCGREGOR/ LIGHTROCKET/ GETTY IMAGES) 

The post Feminists Demand End Of UN Women’s Partnership With Blackrock, Inc appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

Feminist Collective Statement on the Sri Lankan Crisis

27. August 2022 - 10:39

(Collective statement by Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development and Women’s Major Group)

We stand in solidarity with the people of Sri Lanka, particularly with the grassroots women who are currently struggling against an unprecedented economic crisis that has been catastrophic for the nation’s 22 million people, and a crackdown on people’s democratic rights. 

Sri Lanka’s major concerns have been shortages of basic needs services, lengthy blackouts and spikes in inflation where food prices have risen to nearly 60% and the Sri Lankan rupee has crashed to 80% reducing people’s purchasing power. The grave mismanagement of financial resources has led to bankruptcy and poor implementation of programmes. The country has relied on external debt and the usable foreign reserves has become too low to cover their needs from the international market. Sri Lanka imports US$3bn more than it exports every year, resulting in the exhaustion of foreign currency reserves. At the end of 2019, it had US$7.6bn in foreign currency reserves, which have dropped to around US$250m.(1) 

The financial crisis has further fueled the power struggle between the President and the parliament followed by civil unrest and led to the continuing deterioration of human well-being. The Sri Lankan government, historically, has also always been hounded by corruption, lack of accountability, transparency and gender responsiveness, and nepotism that further undermine many facets of human rights. Decreasing public financing and support to social services has been deteriorating quality of life and the well-being particularly of marginalised groups including women and girls. Delivery of sexual and reproductive health services, including maternal health care and access to contraception is severely impacted (2) and many young women have been experiencing a medical crisis as the current economic crisis affects supplies of medicines and equipment, leading to increasing maternal mortality. Amid fuel and medicine shortages, the crisis has also increased women and girls’ vulnerability to violence.

Presently, the Sri Lankan Government has been lobbying with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank (WB) for a bailout, which could be another detrimental blow to their struggling economy. The situation in Sri Lanka should shed light on the broken system of neoliberal global economic governance and expose the role of the World Bank and IMF in this economic crisis. 

The World Bank supported the development of Free Trade Zones (FTZ) in Sri Lanka, aiming to attract Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and foreign companies, involving global brands and their apparel suppliers. This while corporations have been enjoying the incentive schemes, including tax holidays, tax breaks and subsidies. Eighty five percent (85%) of the workers in FTZs in Sri Lanka are women. Most women migrated from rural areas and are generally economically marginalised with the hope to improve their and their family’s quality of life, but instead, they are hired as low-wage workers and trapped in labour exploitation (Women’s Centre, 2022). In Katunayake FTZ, thousands of garment workers have to cope with long working hours for little pay and are forced to work in an exploitative system where it is difficult to get unpaid sick leave.

Soaring cost-of-living crises brought more misery for women workers who have been working in low-standard employment and harsh conditions. Some experienced retrenchment, and for the rest, the pay and benefits are rock-bottom. They are forced to bear the risk of economic recession. “This time is very difficult…. Day by day it becomes very difficult to live. And the facilities inside the factories are decreasing more and more. We don’t understand how we can face this. We can’t even go to the village. The situation in houses is even more difficult.” said a Katunayake FTZ woman worker (Stand Up Movement Lanka, 2022). Seventy eight percent (78%) of total garment workers in Sri Lanka have further deteriorated due to the crisis brought by the pandemic (Women’s Centre, 2021). 

The crisis also results in tripling the burden of women in their households and communities to provide food for their families. According to the latest World Food Programme report, there are now 6.26 million Sri Lankans or 3 out of 10 families unable to provide their next meal. Inflation has also been impacting the purchasing power of the lower middle class, widening further the inequality gap and worsening poverty situations. This also affects nutrition of pregnant and lactating mothers, as they lack access to healthy and nutritious food due to the crisis. The crisis has indeed worsened the lack of social protection. Previous programmes such as Samurdhi have proven to be ineffective and a waste in resources as it continues to lack a structured mechanism for management, monitoring and evaluation, and accountability from government agencies.

During the High Level Political Forum 2022, Sri Lanka delivered its Voluntary National Review (VNR), which was a crucial moment to reflect these realities. However, there were no civil society representatives physically present from Sri Lanka to deliver in-person their collective statement. This signals the lack of transparency and accountability, and shrinking space for democratic participation in the development processes. The situation in Sri Lanka is also a wake-up call (if not too late) to many countries in the Asia Pacific region on the implications of debt traps, unfair trade rules, illicit financial flows, among others. 

In this regard, we present the following recommendations in the context of the Sri Lankan crisis: 

● For multilateral institutions especially the UN to come up with a mechanism that will allow cancellation of the principal, interest and charges on sovereign external debt of the country without future accruals; 

● For multilateral institutions such as the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development–Development Assistance Committee (OECD-DAC) to come up with ODA for gender-responsive, human rights-based effective development cooperation to bring Sri Lanka from the current crisis of development; 

● For the government to act with transparency and accountability in the financial management and resource allocation; 

● For the government to provide subsidy to sectors being severely affected by the crisis, as well as ensure financing for public services well appropriated; 

● For the government to recognise and uphold the rule of law in confronting civil society demands and recommendations; 

● For the government to respect human rights and right to organise of peoples’ movements and civil society organisations, including to provide guarantee for the worker’s rights to organise and collective bargaining without threats of dismissal or any other reprisals; 

● For the government to ensure people’s right to health, including sexual and reproducitve health and rights and provide equitabble access to medicines, treatments and vaccinations as part of the universal health coverage; 

● For the government to ensure survivors of gender-based violence have timely access to justice and life-saving services, including but not limited to comprehensive and quality medical treatment and emergency protection services. 

● For the government to recognise the role of civil society groups in engaging and forwarding recommendations in the development process, which includes policy proposals in partnerships and stakeholder involvement in development programmes; 

● And finally, the government and multilateral institutions to recognise the systemic root causes of the crisis today in Sri Lanka in order to provide the appropriate solutions such as rejuvenation efforts for the local economy and not to include any austerity measures, and/or privatisation of public services. 

We stand in solidarity to dismantle this system of oppressions. We stand with the Sri Lankan grassroots women and their communities and civil society organisations in demanding transformative change. We demand human rights and Development Justice. ###

Reference:

Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development: apwld@apwld.org 

For media interviews: edz@apwld.org 

 1 https://www.bbc.com/news/world-61028138  

 2 https://reliefweb.int/report/sri-lanka/upholding-dignity-and-building-resilience-women-and-girls-unfpas-response-economic-crisis  

The post Feminist Collective Statement on the Sri Lankan Crisis appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

WMG statement: Ad Hoc Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) to Prepare for the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee on Plastic Pollution

21. August 2022 - 19:02

WMG statement: Ad Hoc Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) to Prepare for the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee on Plastic Pollution. This statement was delivered by Maria Soledad Mella Vidal, Chilean National Association of Recyclers, in May 2022.

“Thank you, chair. I am going to speak in Spanish now. 

Soy Soledad Mella de la Asociación Nacional de Recicladores de Chile, miembro de la Alianza Global de los Recicladores, y hablo en nombre de las Mujeres Recicladoras del mundo.

Apoyamos firmemente el proceso para llegar a un tratado legalmente vinculante sobre los plásticos en todo su ciclo de vida, y agradecemos a Senegal por esta oportunidad. Creemos importante el empoderamiento de las mujeres recicladoras frente al nuevo escenario que se viene.

Hoy queremos tratar 3 puntos fundamentales:

  • En primer lugar, nos preocupa la toxicidad en todo el ciclo de vida de los plásticos, que afecta a nuestra salud y, en particular, a las de las mujeres, teniendo graves consecuencias en la salud de nuestros hijos e hijas debido a la exposición de los contaminantes. Instamos a los Estados a que aborden los impactos de los tóxicos en las negociaciones;
  • En segundo lugar, la negociación es la oportunidad de avanzar hacia una transición justa y sensible en la materia de género. Esto implica el desarrollo de un mecanismo que garantice una transición justa para las mujeres; 
  • En último lugar, las mujeres deben participar en todo el proceso de negociación del tratado, incluso a nivel nacional y regional. Esto sólo puede lograrse con una participación oportuna antes y durante cada reunión que sea abierta, significativa, inclusiva, transparente e igualitaria, para esto necesitamos recursos y apoyo financiero, con el establecimiento de un fondo para apoyar la participación significativa de los recicladores. Los intercambios regulares deben incluir a las mujeres recicladoras y a sus representantes.

Esperamos la cooperación continua y la participación plena y significativa de la sociedad civil y las partes interesadas, especialmente las mujeres, en toda su diversidad.” 

(English)

Thank you, chair. I am going to speak in Spanish now. 

I am Soledad Mella from the National Association of Waste Pickers of Chile, a member of the Global Alliance of Waste Pickers, and I am speaking on behalf of the women waste pickers.

We strongly support the process to reach a legally binding treaty on plastics throughout their life cycle, and we thank Senegal for this opportunity. We believe it is important to empower women waste pickers in the new scenario ahead.

Today we want to address 3 key points:

  • First, we are concerned about toxicity throughout the life cycle of plastics, which affects our health and in particular those of women, having serious consequences on the health of our sons and daughters due to exposure to pollutants. We urge States to address the impacts of toxics in the negotiations;
  • Second, the negotiation is an opportunity to move towards a genderjust transition. This implies the development of a mechanism to ensure a just transition for women; 
  • Finally, women must be involved throughout the treaty negotiation process, including at the national and regional levels. This can only be achieved with timely participation before and during each meeting that is open, meaningful, inclusive, transparent and equal. For this we need resources and financial support, with the establishment of a fund to support the meaningful participation of waste pickers. Regular exchanges should include women waste pickers and their representatives.

We look forward to the continued cooperation and full and meaningful participation of civil society and stakeholders, especially women, in all their diversity. 

The post WMG statement: Ad Hoc Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) to Prepare for the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee on Plastic Pollution appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

HLPF 2022 Interventions

22. Juli 2022 - 22:15

In this year’s High-Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development (HLPF), feminists of Women’s Major Group came together to draft interventions, which we were able to deliver in official thematic and VNR sessions that can also be found on UN Web TV. Below you may find a compilation of our recorded interventions, including some we were unable to deliver.

On the first day of HLPF 2022, it was disappointing to see civil society voices being dropped off from the discussion at HLPF 2022. It was also disappointing that civil society has been scheduled to be heard at the very end of the sessions thereby leaving them with barely any time to raise their concerns and demands. WMG member, Daksha Vaja, Community Science Center India, was to take the floor to bring attention to the importance of education in Science, Technology & Innovation toward #SRHR & gender equality before her intervention was cancelled for ‘lack of time’.

Intervention delivered by Saba Gebremedhin, Network of Ethiopian Women Associations (NEWA) and a Malala Fund partner organization, on the linkages of SDG 4 to girls’ education and gender equality.

Pille Tsopp-Pagan, from WSIC, as Lead Discussant at Session on SDG 5 – Gender equality, and interlinkages with other SDGs. Her intervention focussed on the dire situation of SDG 5 since its last review in 2017, and for the needs of women and girls, in all their diversities, to be addressed more comprehensively.

Intervention delivered by Pamela Martin Garcia on 11 July

Pamela Martin Garcia, delivering an intervention from the floor for the session on Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Mabel Bianco as Panelist on 12 July

Mabel Bianco, FEIM, as Panelist reminding the Member States and the UN about the vision of civil society: leaving no one behind in recovering better, and warning about the risk of leaving HLPF2022 without a firm political commitment to the Agenda 2030.

Emilia Reyes, Equidad de Género, as Panelist reiterating the urgency of the Global South that needs to be felt in the Global North and at the UN, and pushing for strong decisions that put people first, and not profits.

Svetlana Slesarenok, Founder and Director of Black Sea Women’s Club, speaking as a refugee from the war in Ukraine on the incompatibility between war and sustainable development, and the role of fossil fuels in conflict.

Cecile Karla, REFACOF, makes an intervention with regards to elimination of gender-based violence, prejudice and discrimination, and prioritizing education, including SRHR.

Intervention delivered by Rashima Kwatra on 12 July

Rashima Kwatra, RFSL, makes an intervention on behalf of the LGBTI SG, highlighting the widening vulnerabilities for women & girls, migrants, persons with disabilities, persons with HIV, and LGBTI groups.

April Porteria, as lead discussant speaks on behalf of MGoS CM & APRCEM proposing the alternative approach of Development Justice with an intersectional focus on systemic barriers.

Vanessa M. Cortés, from Asociació Stop Violéncias Andorra, makes an intervention against Andorra government for imprisoning feminist activists who are fighting for the right to safe and legal abortion, and bodily autonomy.

Sascha Gabizon, WECF, delivered a statement on behalf of the Civil Society of Guinea Bissau, urging the state increase state budgets for education and health, and to reaffirm their commitment to SDG 5.

You can also find all our HLPF 2022 interventions compiled in this YouTube playlist.

The post HLPF 2022 Interventions appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

HLPF 2022 Interventions

22. Juli 2022 - 22:15

In this year’s High-Level Political Forum for Sustainable Development (HLPF), feminists of Women’s Major Group came together to draft interventions, which we were able to deliver in official thematic and VNR sessions that can also be found on UN Web TV. Below you may find a compilation of our recorded interventions, including some we were unable to deliver.

On the first day of HLPF 2022, it was disappointing to see civil society voices being dropped off from the discussion at HLPF 2022. It was also disappointing that civil society has been scheduled to be heard at the very end of the sessions thereby leaving them with barely any time to raise their concerns and demands. WMG member, Daksha Vaja, Community Science Center India, was to take the floor to bring attention to the importance of education in Science, Technology & Innovation toward #SRHR & gender equality before her intervention was cancelled for ‘lack of time’.

Intervention delivered by Saba Gebremedhin, Network of Ethiopian Women Associations (NEWA) and a Malala Fund partner organization, on the linkages of SDG 4 to girls’ education and gender equality.

Pille Tsopp-Pagan, from WSIC, as Lead Discussant at Session on SDG 5 – Gender equality, and interlinkages with other SDGs. Her intervention focussed on the dire situation of SDG 5 since its last review in 2017, and for the needs of women and girls, in all their diversities, to be addressed more comprehensively.

Intervention delivered by Pamela Martin Garcia on 11 July

Pamela Martin Garcia, delivering an intervention from the floor for the session on Small Island Developing States (SIDS).

Mabel Bianco as Panelist on 12 July

Mabel Bianco, FEIM, as Panelist reminding the Member States and the UN about the vision of civil society: leaving no one behind in recovering better, and warning about the risk of leaving HLPF2022 without a firm political commitment to the Agenda 2030.

Emilia Reyes, Equidad de Género, as Panelist reiterating the urgency of the Global South that needs to be felt in the Global North and at the UN, and pushing for strong decisions that put people first, and not profits.

Svetlana Slesarenok, Founder and Director of Black Sea Women’s Club, speaking as a refugee from the war in Ukraine on the incompatibility between war and sustainable development, and the role of fossil fuels in conflict.

Cecile Karla, REFACOF, makes an intervention with regards to elimination of gender-based violence, prejudice and discrimination, and prioritizing education, including SRHR.

April Porteria, as lead discussant speaks on behalf of MGoS CM & APRCEM proposing the alternative approach of Development Justice with an intersectional focus on systemic barriers.

Vanessa M. Cortés, from Asociació Stop Violéncias Andorra, makes an intervention against Andorra government for imprisoning feminist activists who are fighting for the right to safe and legal abortion, and bodily autonomy.

Sascha Gabizon, WECF, makes an intervention urging the state of Guinea-Bissau to increase state budgets for education and health, and to reaffirm their commitment to SDG 5.

You can also find all our HLPF 2022 interventions compiled in this YouTube playlist.

The post HLPF 2022 Interventions appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

WMG Highlights from HLPF 2022!

22. Juli 2022 - 21:27

WMG Highlights from HLPF 2022!

HLPF 2022 has been an amazing two weeks with our members and allies in New York and online. The challenges of participation and process were still very much there, further heightened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Many of our members and allies could not be physically present with us due to several political and logistical reasons. We also faced challenges with regards to virtual modalities. However, we were still ready to demand and advocate for system change. We have been present in all spaces possible and created impact. We turned 30 this year and were able to celebrate together!

We thank all our members and allies deeply for their fierce feminist advocacy. There is still much work needed to ensure that we move towards a more accountable and effective Agenda 2030, for a peaceful, sustainable and equitable future for all, and to recover from the pandemic to a system centered on human rights and care. It uplifts us, however, to know that we’ll work together to bring this transformative change, and to bring to reality this system that we, feminists, have envisioned collectively.

Here are a few highlights from all the hard work that were undertaken by the fierce feminists of WMG during HLPF 2022:

WMG turns 30!

This year the Women’s Major Group celebrated 30 years of activism within the UN. The WMG was founded at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where governments recognized “Women” as one of 9 key constituencies under the “Major Groups and other Stakeholders” (MGoS). The MGoS has been crucial for civil society to have a voice in UN processes and monitor the 2030 Agenda & its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Just as critical to its presence in official UN spaces is the WMG presence outside of them. One of the WMG’s biggest successes has been strengthening regional knowledge sharing & coordination efforts—adopting the MGoS system to the regions, but making it even stronger. As we move forward, we will continue to raise the demand that #FeministsWantSystemsChange! We were joined by WMG members, feminist civil society, Major Groups and other Stakeholders, member states, and UN representatives for a rooftop reception!

Theme

HLPF 2022 discussed in depth Building back better from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) while advancing the full implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. You can read WMG’s position on the SDGs in our HLPF 2022 Position Paper here 

Statements & Interventions 
  • 8 interventions (including VNRs questions/statements) in official sessions
  • 2 panelist in the official sessions
  • 2 lead discussants
  • 1 intervention was dropped citing ‘lack of time’

We uploaded the videos of all our interventions and VNR statements to our website and Youtube channel. The VNR alternative reports submitted to us are already online here, on our website. They carry the critical feminist systemic analysis of our members and give important clues into what needs to be done, and done urgently!

Events 

We had one WMG official side event this year : Centrality of Human Rights to SDG 5 and Agenda 2030. We also hosted a special event : WMG Strategy Session: Synergies between CSW66 & HLPF 2022, and co-sponsored 7 other side events. The full list are available soon on our website!

WMG supported the organization of the MGoS CM Side Event and Official Session, WMG political discussion, an SGDs Learning, Training & Practice Session focused on various data, tech and advocacy for SDG5, with our segment on “Nourishing Feminist Advocacy for Transformative Change”, a civil society demonstration to say: “The People Want System Change!” and co-hosted a feminist coffee meet up!

Our members were active as organizers, moderators, and speakers well over 10 other events.  

Delegation Meetings

We had five official meetings with delegations. We hope to stay in touch with all the delegations we’ve met, to share information and advocacy priorities with them throughout the year. We can be reached at contact@womensmajorgroup.org for meeting & collaboration possibilities.

Colour Campaign

It was heartwarming to see the level of solidarity, physically and virtually, for our color campaign, and to see everyone looking so amazing in that day’s color in our morning caucuses and the virtual meetings! It was also awesome to see allies wearing our colors, tying the scarves to their name plates, mentioning the color campaign in their speeches & amplifying the color campaign online too! In many of the Official Sessions, the panelists wore our scarves, and we even got shoutouts from Member States who supported our color campaign and demand of the day!

You can find all our photos from the color campaign inputs at the photos section of our Facebook & Instagram accounts. Our colors were very visible on social media! Please find the graphics prepared here! You can find photos for all days here.

We also prepared a social media toolkit in English and Spanish! Many thanks to our members who’ve supported us with the translation to Spanish & French, and provided us with the Alt text for accessibility of the English graphics, that are in the toolkit for you to use.

This year’s incredible messages, graphics and Zoom backgrounds will always remain available. So please please support us by bookmarking the link to the social media toolkit, and using the materials whenever you can throughout the year, to show WMG’s advocacy on gender equality and sustainable development is year-round work!

Digital Engagement

Twitter: Overall through the HLPF 2022, we’ve sent 180 tweets from the @Women_Rio20, and our tweets got over 90.4K total impressions. We were able to bring in 23.2K new profile visits, 336 mentions, and 158 new followers.

The #FeministsWantSystemChange hashtag had been used in more than 1500 tweets during HLPF2022, and had 9.2 million possible reach!

Instagram: We reached 1129 accounts, engaged with 292 new accounts and gained 90 followers.

WMG also supported the preparation and dissemination of the MGoS CM statement on the Ministerial Declaration adopted on the 15th of July.

Please see all our incredible digital outputs at our social media channels, and please do not forget to follow us :

Twitter: @Women_Rio20
Facebook: Women’s Major Group
Instagram: @womensmajorgroup
Youtube: Women’s Major Group

You can subscribe to WMG listservs here.

We thank all our members and allies for all their support, expertise, work, time and solidarity. We are already very much excited for our collective, fierce feminist advocacy in the upcoming days and months. Next year, HLPF 2023 will be under the auspices of UNGA. With the SDG Summit in September, our fierce feminist advocacy ahead is much urgent and important.

In solidarity.

The post WMG Highlights from HLPF 2022! appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

WMG Highlights from HLPF 2022!

22. Juli 2022 - 21:27

WMG Highlights from HLPf 2022!

HLPF 2022 has been an amazing two weeks with our members and allies in New York and online. The challenges of participation and process were still very much there, further heightened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Many of our members and allies could not be physically present with us due to several political and logistical reasons. We also faced challenges with regards to virtual modalities. However, we were still ready to demand and advocate for system change. We have been present in all spaces possible and created impact. We turned 30 this year and were able to celebrate together!

We thank all our members and allies deeply for their fierce feminist advocacy. There is still much work needed to ensure that we move towards a more accountable and effective Agenda 2030, for a peaceful, sustainable and equitable future for all, and to recover from the pandemic to a system centered on human rights and care. It uplifts us, however, to know that we’ll work together to bring this transformative change, and to bring to reality this system that we, feminists, have envisioned collectively.

Here are a few highlights from all the hard work that were undertaken by the fierce feminists of WMG during HLPF 2022:

WMG turns 30!

This year the Women’s Major Group celebrated 30 years of activism within the UN. The WMG was founded at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where governments recognized “Women” as one of 9 key constituencies under the “Major Groups and other Stakeholders” (MGoS). The MGoS has been crucial for civil society to have a voice in UN processes and monitor the 2030 Agenda & its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Just as critical to its presence in official UN spaces is the WMG presence outside of them. One of the WMG’s biggest successes has been strengthening regional knowledge sharing & coordination efforts—adopting the MGoS system to the regions, but making it even stronger. As we move forward, we will continue to raise the demand that #FeministsWantSystemsChange! We were joined by WMG members, feminist civil society, Major Groups and other Stakeholders, member states, and UN representatives for a rooftop reception!

Theme

HLPF 2022 discussed in depth Building back better from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) while advancing the full implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. You can read WMG’s position on the SDGs in our HLPF 2022 Position Paper here 

Statements & Interventions 
  • 8 interventions (including VNRs questions/statements) in official sessions
  • 2 panelist in the official sessions
  • 2 lead discussants
  • 1 intervention was dropped citing ‘lack of time’

We uploaded the videos of all our interventions and VNR statements to our website and Youtube channel. The VNR alternative reports submitted to us are already online here, on our website. They carry the critical feminist systemic analysis of our members and give important clues into what needs to be done, and done urgently!

Events 

We had one WMG official side event this year : Centrality of Human Rights to SDG 5 and Agenda 2030. We also hosted a special event : WMG Strategy Session: Synergies between CSW66 & HLPF 2022, and co-sponsored 7 other side events. The full list are available soon on our website!

WMG supported the organization of the MGoS CM Side Event and Official Session, WMG political discussion, an SGDs Learning, Training & Practice Session focused on various data, tech and advocacy for SDG5, with our segment on “Nourishing Feminist Advocacy for Transformative Change”, a civil society demonstration to say: “The People Want System Change!” and co-hosted a feminist coffee meet up!

Our members were active as organizers, moderators, and speakers well over 10 other events.  

Delegation Meetings

We had five official meetings with delegations. We hope to stay in touch with all the delegations we’ve met, to share information and advocacy priorities with them throughout the year. We can be reached at contact@womensmajorgroup.org for meeting & collaboration possibilities.

Colour Campaign

It was heartwarming to see the level of solidarity, physically and virtually, for our color campaign, and to see everyone looking so amazing in that day’s color in our morning caucuses and the virtual meetings! It was also awesome to see allies wearing our colors, tying the scarves to their name plates, mentioning the color campaign in their speeches & amplifying the color campaign online too! In many of the Official Sessions, the panelists wore our scarves, and we even got shoutouts from Member States who supported our color campaign and demand of the day!

You can find all our photos from the color campaign inputs at the photos section of our Facebook & Instagram accounts. Our colors were very visible on social media! Please find the graphics prepared here! You can find photos for all days here.

We also prepared a social media toolkit in English and Spanish! Many thanks to our members who’ve supported us with the translation to Spanish & French, and provided us with the Alt text for accessibility of the English graphics, that are in the toolkit for you to use.

This year’s incredible messages, graphics and Zoom backgrounds will always remain available. So please please support us by bookmarking the link to the social media toolkit, and using the materials whenever you can throughout the year, to show WMG’s advocacy on gender equality and sustainable development is year-round work!

Digital Engagement

Twitter: Overall through the HLPF 2022, we’ve sent 180 tweets from the @Women_Rio20, and our tweets got over 90.4K total impressions. We were able to bring in 23.2K new profile visits, 336 mentions, and 158 new followers.

The #FeministsWantSystemChange hashtag had been used in more than 1500 tweets during HLPF2022, and had 9.2 million possible reach!

Instagram: We reached 1129 accounts, engaged with 292 new accounts and gained 90 followers.

WMG also supported the preparation and dissemination of the MGoS CM statement on the Ministerial Declaration adopted on the 15th of July.

Please see all our incredible digital outputs at our social media channels, and please do not forget to follow us :

Twitter: @Women_Rio20
Facebook: Women’s Major Group
Instagram: @womensmajorgroup
Youtube: Women’s Major Group

You can subscribe to WMG listservs here.

We thank all our members and allies for all their support, expertise, work, time and solidarity. We are already very much excited for our collective, fierce feminist advocacy in the upcoming days and months. Next year, HLPF 2023 will be under the auspices of UNGA. With the SDG Summit in September, our fierce feminist advocacy ahead is much urgent and important.

In solidarity.

The post WMG Highlights from HLPF 2022! appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

HLPF 2022 Alternative VNR Reports by Our Members

8. Juli 2022 - 0:17

Similar to previous years, the Women’s Major Group’s members throughout the World, have prepared Alternative / Shadow Reports for their countries’ Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs). The list of HLPF 2022’s VNR countries can be found here.

Unless otherwise stated, the parallel reports are the sole product of the authoring member or organization. The WMG does, however, support the valuable advocacy and mobilizing work done by the members on the local, national, and regional level through the process of holding their governments accountable.

In fact, developing a shadow report can be a powerful tool in any case. It provides a platform to work across civil society organizations, creates opportunities to engage with your government, helps determine a baseline to measure change over time, generates information and analysis to use in advocacy and media work, and helps to identify gaps and deficiencies in government policies and programs. If you are engaged in other types of international reporting, such as reporting to the CEDAW Committee, you may be able to use information and analysis from one shadow report to support another.” – WMG’s Engaging with the National Voluntary Review Process

Afghanistan (Not a VNR Country)

Malala Fund’s Report on SDG 4  and 5 on Achieving Gender Equality (English)

Andorra

Report by Stop Violències (English) (Spanish)

Argentina

Confronting Challenges: Strategies for Recovery Post COVID-19 (English)

Brazil (Not a VNR Country)

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Report (English) (Portuguese)

Cameroon

Statement by Civil Society Organizations of Cameroon (English)(French)

Ethiopia

Malala Fund’s Report on the Progress and Challenges of SDG 4 and 5 (English)

Netherlands

Civil Society Shadow Report by Rutgers, WO=MEN and CHOICE for Youth and Sexuality (English)

Togo

Report by African Women’s Network for Community Management of Forests (REFACOF) on Progress in the Implementation of SDG 5, 15 & 17 (French)

International

Soroptimist International’s Para 89 Report on Education and Empowerment (English)

The post HLPF 2022 Alternative VNR Reports by Our Members appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english

HLPF 2022 Alternative VNR Reports by Our Members

8. Juli 2022 - 0:17

Similar to previous years, the Women’s Major Group’s members throughout the World, have prepared Alternative / Shadow Reports for their countries’ Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs). The list of HLPF 2022’s VNR countries can be found here.

Unless otherwise stated, the parallel reports are the sole product of the authoring member or organization. The WMG does, however, support the valuable advocacy and mobilizing work done by the members on the local, national, and regional level through the process of holding their governments accountable.

In fact, developing a shadow report can be a powerful tool in any case. It provides a platform to work across civil society organizations, creates opportunities to engage with your government, helps determine a baseline to measure change over time, generates information and analysis to use in advocacy and media work, and helps to identify gaps and deficiencies in government policies and programs. If you are engaged in other types of international reporting, such as reporting to the CEDAW Committee, you may be able to use information and analysis from one shadow report to support another.” – WMG’s Engaging with the National Voluntary Review Process

Afghanistan (Not a VNR Country)

Malala Fund’s Report on SDG 4  and 5 on Achieving Gender Equality (English)

Andorra

Report by Stop Violències (English) (Spanish)

Brazil (Not a VNR Country)

2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Report (English) (Portuguese)

Ethiopia

Malala Fund’s Report on the Progress and Challenges of SDG 4 and 5 (English)

International

Soroptimist International’s Para 89 Report on Education and Empowerment (English)

The post HLPF 2022 Alternative VNR Reports by Our Members appeared first on Women's Major Group.

Kategorien: english