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Training Needs Assessment for CPDE’s 2022 Communications Workshops

27. September 2022 - 10:34

The CPDE Communications Team is organising a series of workshops to support the global coordination of the platform’s activities and campaigns that is reflected through its communications work. The plan is to hold the workshops at the end of October and they will be open to all CPDE members and CSOs interested in issues related to Effective Development Cooperation (EDC).

In an effort to build the platform’s capacities and collectively address areas for improvement, we invite you to respond to a quick survey so that we can gain insight on your experiences, challenges and best practices in the following domains:

  1. Media Relations
  2. Hosting online events
  3. Digital content creation

The survey is available in English, Spanish and French.

With these workshops, CPDE aims to provide a space that 1) fosters stronger collaboration between CPDE members and units to improve media relations, event hosting and content creation; and 2) develops our capacities as a platform to tell more engaging stories to the media, produce more engaging content and organise online events more efficiently.

Last year, the Communications Team held two days of workshops on the CPDE brand, improving social media relations, search engine optimisation (SEO), building a communications strategy, CPDE’s advocacy work and designing communications materials.

We hope to continue this tradition of holding yearly workshops to attend to our network’s needs!

Follow this space for updates on the dates and agenda of the workshops.

 

The post Training Needs Assessment for CPDE’s 2022 Communications Workshops appeared first on CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness.

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CPDE to hold sessions on civic space, youth participation in climate action at Global People’s Assembly

16. September 2022 - 17:49

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness is co-organising two sessions at the Global People’s Assembly on Wednesday, 21 September 2022.

Held in time for the United Nations General Assembly high-level week, the Global People’s Assembly is a space that aims to bring the voices of the people to the forefront.

One session, on Civic Freedoms and Civil Society Participation, was organised in partnership with CIVICUS, and will happen 12:00 – 13:00 EST | 18:00 – 19:00 CET (register here). The other, co-hosted with MY World Mexico and available in Spanish, will tackle Youth meaningful engagement in climate action and SDGs in Latin America. It will be held 14:00 – 15:00 EST | 20:00 – 21:00 CET (register here) Check out the full Global People’s Assembly programme here for more information. #

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What does Effective Development Cooperation in Climate Finance look like?    

9. September 2022 - 8:34

In various arenas, environmental activists and advocates have opined that climate finance, if not climate action, must be anchored on principles of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities. But a bleak scenario has been steadily brewing for the past decade, with developed nations that should be at the forefront of providing climate aid and reparations leaving much to be desired in their commitments and pledges, as translated into their biennial reports and Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).[1]

These days, voluntary, “nationally appropriated” contributions have become the new norm in climate aid delivery. The situation calls for heightened efforts to ensure that climate finance is first and foremost, effective, participatory and is attuned to the needs of Southern developing countries. These countries have been for so long paying the price for climate breakdown and the ensuing catastrophes — something that they have least contributed to themselves.

How do we guarantee that the promise of climate finance made continually by the world’s historic emitters year after year goes beyond mere lip service and endows lasting impact, especially at the country level?

In line with its advocacy to universalise Effective Development Cooperation (EDC), CPDE aims to bring the urgency of the climate emergency and its grave impacts on communities at the centre of development discourse. It argues that climate finance must be informed by the four development effectiveness principles: financing climate actions for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) must uphold democratic ownership, transparency and accountability, inclusive partnerships for development, and focus on country-determined results.

Current discussions and actions in the climate finance arena reveal multiple gaps in the application of these principles. These, in turn, hinder climate action towards reducing current GHG emissions and rising global temperature.

The call for effectiveness within climate finance presents an opportunity for all climate stakeholders. For civil society in particular, effectiveness will help develop the mechanism into one that includes and empower communities at the national, regional, and sectoral levels.

The proposal for an EDC-centred climate finance infrastructure and mechanism entails the following principles:

 

Country ownership that is both inclusive and democratic

Meeting the needs of the most vulnerable and marginalised does not end at allocating direct, adequate resources as quickly as possible. To be inclusive or effective, climate aid must gurantee developing countries set their own national development priorities. To meet that end, participation of country stakeholders and CSOs must also go beyond episodic consultation conducted by governments.

Enhancing inclusion and meaningful participation of CSOs in development planning and UNFCCC processes is part and parcel of making climate finance more accessible to the grassroots communities that ultimately bear the brunt of the climate crisis. This includes development partners and other relevant actors aligning their support to country systems and communities and territorial priorities, on top of acknowledging the traditional knowledge and skill sets held by people on the ground. . Within climate resources and investment leverage and negotiations, proposing false “zero emissions” and “net zero” approaches which are really fossil-fueled or fossil-dependent is known to be the most widespread and common practice. Fossil fuel projects are also still being approved[2], funded, and initiated, despite the latest IPCC report urgent recommendations.

 

Enhanced transparency and accountability at the country level

With too few mutual accountability mechanisms existing at the country level, we are risking a present and near future where developed countries’ accountability to NDCs remains increasingly weak, apart from it being voluntary. Moreover, this results in climate aid that is nowhere near being truly additional to ODA.

A meaningful country-level accountability mechanism is established when countries and their development partners build country-level processes that go beyond being consultative. Said processes must be accompanied by capacity development measures that aim to aid country stakeholders in using data to strengthen accountability.

Transparency in climate finance will then be achieved when deliberate steps are taken to ensure that all related information towards tracking development progress is publicly available for concerned citizens and country-level CSOs’ access.[3] This entails disaggregating existing and future data in tracking the reporting of ODA allotted to climate finance as well as rightfully addressing the yawning gap between grants and loans in the effective delivery of climate finance — putting(prioritising?)  people’s interests over profit.

 

Enabling environment for inclusive partnerships

Establishing an open civic space upholds inclusive partnerships as a core principle in achieving development cooperation. An open civic space is one which is free from harassment and human rights violations, and ensures sustained civic engagement and meaningful participation at the subnational level.

An enabling environment acknowledges what civil society can bring to the table, recognising that a whole-of-society approach is essential and influential in fostering human rights, inclusive decision-making, and transformative change in climate response.

All development actors must then step up in creating the legal and political regulations which enable the necessary space t for CSOs, allowing for o truly promoting climate finance partnerships with donors, community-based organisations, and local governments that focus on empowerment, decision-making, and capacity development. Hand in hand with this is ensuring climate finance will/shall never be weaponized at the expense not only of human rights and environmental defenders’ rights[4] but also of people and their communities, biodiversity, ecosystems and the environment.

 

Focus on country-determined results

While country-led frameworks are the foundation of inclusive development, a robust monitoring and evaluation system is equally crucial in assessing whether investments are reaping long-term benefits for recipient countries.

Results should lead to climate resilience. Climate finance will therefore be effective when the impacts of development objectives and outcomes are examined based on whether they fulfil “country-owned” strategies and priorities. This includes applying, regularly monitoring, and assessing adherence to the development effectiveness principles in the administration of climate finance, especially those furnished by bilateral donors, international financing institutions (IFIs), and multilateral development banks (MDBs).

Development cooperation can be achieved and further upheld by ensuring climate finance allocated in mitigation and adaptation projects produces long lasting transformative results. This also aligns with the global South’s call for an increase in adaptation resources, urgently upscaling the use of grants over loans to revert indebtedness trends linked to climate finance resource allocation, as well as incorporating the need for specific loss and damage climate finance.

As tactics posing as sustainable solutions threaten to jeopardise the essence of climate response/commitments and the communities in dire need of it, civil society must call for equity and justice to truly reflect how aid and reparations should be implemented in the just transition towards a sustainable future for all diverse forms of life in our planet. #

[1] Parties’ current NDCs are not on track in meeting the Paris Agreement’s goals, with identified problems ranging from a lack of adequate finance and capacity to insufficient political commitment and pandemic-related economic downturn.

[2] For instance, seven new oil and gas projects funded by the United Kingdom, United States, and Exxon Mobil among others have sprung left and right in Latin America, Africa, and the North Sea.

[3] 40% of the countries surveyed by CPDE in 2019 shared that access to required information at the national level was seen to be non-existent or very poor, with very few country-level CSOs accessing or using data from the OECD DAC or the IATI.

[4] The Escazú Agreement (Acuerdo de Escazú), entered into force in 2021, plays a significant role as the first regional treaty to regulate the legal protection of environmental and human rights defenders in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The post What does Effective Development Cooperation in Climate Finance look like?     appeared first on CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness.

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Global People’s Assembly 2022: Time is Now: Act for peace, climate, and justice

8. September 2022 - 11:17

CPDE joins other civil society organisations at the Global People’s Assembly, which will take place virtually from the 20th to 22nd of September 2022.

The Global People’s Assembly is a self-organised space during the United Nations General Assembly high-level week. It aims is to bring the voices of the people to the forefront, at a time where decision makers engage in high-level debate without people’s involvement.

Activities include various sessions, on such topics as proposals for a more democratic UN, civic freedoms and civil society participation, gender equality and systemic challenges, financing for development, For its part, CPDE is organising a side-event on the meaningful engagement of youth in climate action and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Global People’s Assembly will culminate in a virtual Global Justice March on 22 September 2022, 10-11 UDT.

Sign on to a statement titled Time is Now: Act for peace, climate, and justice via this link. And to view the entire programme here.  #

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CPDE Statement on World Humanitarian Day

22. August 2022 - 17:23

The CPDE Task Force on Nexus Issues secretariat shared this statement last 19 August 2022 for this year’s World Humanitarian Day.

Conflicts and crises remain to be the primary causes of the need for humanitarian responses. This year, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) estimated that around 274 million people would need humanitarian assistance and protection. This estimate supersedes the previous highest figure as new conflicts and crises continue to emerge and as the Covid-19 pandemic continues to have a disrupting effect up to this day.

Although many vulnerable people are affected by war, violence, climate and food crises, national and regional instability, and disease outbreaks, the growth of international humanitarian assistance has stalled in the past few years. There have also been increased attacks on humanitarian workers, preventing critical supply delivery to affected populations and further threatening people’s human rights and livelihoods.

On today’s World Humanitarian Day, we are one in recognizing the importance of accessible humanitarian assistance and protection to people in conflict and crisis-stricken areas. We stand in solidarity with all humanitarian workers, volunteers, and civilians and support their way to recovery. We call on world leaders to responsibly address the issues of conflicts and crises and to uphold international humanitarian law to protect humanitarian workers and civilians. We call for strengthened cooperation between development and humanitarian partners towards the protection of human rights and welfare and the realization of our shared vision of just and lasting peace.

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CPDE Africa Secretariat to hold Network Management and Project Management Trainings for CSOs

12. August 2022 - 8:02

#SaveTheDate!

CPDE and its regional Secretariat, Reality of Aid Africa, invite Africa-based CPDE members and allies to join these regional capacity development activities.

  • Network Management Training – 31 August – 1 September 2022 – 10 AM to 1PM Nairobi 
  • Project Management Training – 6 and 7 September 2022 – 10 AM to 1PM Nairobi 

Last April 2022, CPDE launched its Capacity Development Materials for CSOs, including a Network Management Guide and Training modules, and a Project Management Guide and Training modules.

Based on these materials, the upcoming learning sessions aim to equip CSOs, especially those working at the national/local level with skills and best practices in managing programmes networks for Effective Development Cooperation (EDC), based on a human-rights based approach to development and other key CPDE principles. 

 

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PHOTO GALLERY: CPDE Asia Regional Meeting and Workshop

4. August 2022 - 4:29

 

CPDE Asia held its Regional Meeting and Workshop at Jakarta, Indonesia on July 27 and 28, with the theme: “Forging through Crises, Fostering Solidarities”

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CPDE UN HLPF side event urges INFF ownership, alignment with national development priorities

25. Juli 2022 - 13:15

Through a virtual side event during the UN High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) in New York titled A look into Integrated National Financing Frameworks (INFFs): Ensuring ownership and alignment with national development priorities, CPDE and its partners facilitated a conversation around how the framework can truly help bring sustainable development.

Held last July 5, the activity was organised together with the Reality of Aid Africa, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Development Cooperation, Italy, UNDESA, UNDP, and the Civil Society Financing for Development (FfD) Group.

According to the organisers, the international community has been steadily investing in the development of INFFs since the Addis Ababa Action Agenda stated their relevance. Notably, the G20 endorsed a voluntary framework in this regard.

Today, INFFs are being promoted by development partners and multilaterals; partner countries are implementing these frameworks on some level; and civil society organisations are trying to better understand potentials and risks, in order to assess the impact on the Financing for Development (FfD) global agenda, the actual space for country ownership and the participation of civil society.

Facilitated by Stefano Prato, Executive Director of the Society for International Development (SID), the event featured presentations and discussions on the overview of INFFs and its approach, survey, and facility by the UN DESA and UNDP, civil society views on the Review of Guidance Material by the CSO FfD Group/CPDE, the INFF G20 framework, implementing country government national experience, and national CSO perspectives on INFF implementation.

In her introduction to the INFFs, Shari Spiegel, Chief, Policy Analysis and Development Branch at FSDO/DESA argued that countries are responsible for their own development, and the international community is responsible for their enabling environment. At the same time, she explains that “while the INFF is potentially a powerful tool, one should not expect too much from it.”

The INFFs, she explained, are a framework to raise financing needs at the national level and to strengthen coherence among policies and actors, and a knowledge and experience sharing platform for implementing countries. These are tools aiming at strengthening the SDGs and existing systems, not to add to, nor to replace them. She also stressed that the purpose of the process is to bring everyone to talk, but that this will not solve existing country governance problems.

Thomas Beloe, Chief of Programme, UNDP Sustainable Finance Hub, described the INFFs as a country-led “work in progress” and insisted that at its core  is an emphasis on broadening the constituencies that engage on finance policy. This is why, he says, the UN strongly encourages the participation and significant contribution of civil society.

Among 86 countries implementing INFFs worldwide, only 28% of national oversight committees count civil society as members. He stressed that “we could do more and should do more to engage different constituencies at every stage of the INFF process.”

For her part, Polly Meeks, an independent researcher for the Civil Society Financing for Development (CS FfD) Group, presented the findings of a review on the INFF guidance material. She started by saying financing issues faced by the Global South countries are systemic, and outside their unique control. The review thus recommends expediting action on systemic global economic governance issues and not to present INFFs as the sole solution.

The review also insists on the full participation of rights holders in all INFF decision-making, as well as giving countries free choice on implementing the INFFs. The paper also recommends that policy reforms being pushed forward within the INFF processes should acknowledge risks, uphold obligations, and value alternatives. For example, economic growth is assumed as a common objective for all countries, but must be reconsidered given the current global threats and climate crisis. The IPCC report for instance recommended a pattern of degrowth for Global North countries.

Meeks also urged taking into account existing researches on the risks associated with some of the INFF tools, and featuring them more prominently on the guidance materials, along with a more diverse range of possible tools and approaches as alternatives. Finally, she pointed out the importance of emphasising the countries’ binding obligations under UN treaties, especially regarding human rights.

Min. Marco Ricci, Chair of the G20 Development Working Group under the Italian Presidency, meanwhile provided an overview of the process and development of the INFF G20 Framework developed over the past two years, explaining its aim to try to cope with the crises of 2020.

He talked about the adoption of the extension of the debt suspension initiative given to 50 lower income countries, and of a common framework – an ambitious instrument aiming to gather all donors, including private donors, around 80 high-debt countries for more structured intervention to make debt sustainable. “We believe that the only way forward is for all creditors to be involved,” he said. They also promoted the adoption of a global minimum tax, seen as the first step towards a global tax.

Italy organised a development ministers’ meeting at the end of June 2021 to discuss INFFs, which led to the later adoption by the G20 DWG of the G20 Framework for voluntary support to a greater uptake and operationalisation of the INFFs for SDG financing and Covid-19 recovery in developing countries. This framework was then adopted by G20 leaders at the Rome summit last October 2021.

Next presenters were CSO speakers Vitalice Meja, Director of Reality of Aid – Africa and Non-Executive Co-Chair of the GPEDC to reflect on Kenya perspective, and Rodolfo Lahoy Jr, Policy, Communications and Training Team Head at IBON International, for the Philippine experience.

Meja said that in Kenya, where INFF is still in development, the process led by government is becoming more inclusive, with the technical steering group including civil society, local authority, and foundations. But he acknowledges that more work needs to be done towards comprehensive ownership, and insisted on the importance to train people locally to develop and implement such processes, instead of relying on external consultants for reports that will only be reviewed later by local actors. He also reiterated the importance of bringing all stakeholders to the table from design to inception to implementation and review. He argued that everyone should engage on the terms of reference, agree on the key questions and areas that need to be looked at, and that the INFF should not only be a government tool that nobody really uses.

He does note that, as of now, this process is solely undertaken by the national Ministry of Finance. And because sustainable development is not only about finance, there is a need for more coherence and various perspectives, hence the involvement of other ministries and civil society actors. He also asked, “What is the added value for this process, especially at the national level? Is there really a demand for this or is this supply-driven?”

He stressed that development partners still play a very big role in setting the direction of development funding in developing countries. He then invites everyone to ask the kind of behavior change we need, want, and expect out of this exercise, especially from development partners: “It is not enough to say that you have a tool to be able to track, to be able to see, but how does that tool lead into a behavior chance that is necessary to generate sufficient resources to finance SDGs?”

Finally, Rodolfo Lahoy Policy, Communications, and Training Team lead of IBON International, then provided CSO perspectives on the INFF in the Philippines. After an overview of the Philippine INFF launched September 2021, its human capital approach (investing in health, education, and gender equity for long term economic growth), systems and stakeholders, Lahoy raised some questions on both democratic ownership and Philippines systemic issues in the context of implementing the INFF.

Regarding the democratic ownership, he laments that the process has not been sufficiently democratic as organisations of the marginalised, such as domestic trade unions, organisations, and urban and rural poor movement, were not influential or even present, across the process. He also warned that INFF process works from uneven terrain of big private sectors vis a vis civil society.

Lahoy asked how the INFF, in aligning with existing country policy priorities, would account for existing structural issues regarding development financing. Among them are the current tax regime being heavy on consumers while investment on special economic zones (SEZ) rely on corporate incentives, the country being highly indebted, and one of the top borrowers from the World Bank, its trade economy being export-oriented, and broadly relying on remittances and Foreign Direct Investments (FDIs) without strong industrial capacity.

He warned that the INFF process might reinforce risky approaches about private finance, and whether the INFF – amid pandemic, multiple crises, unequal recovery – will actually offer a window for more ambitious, systemic policy shifts. All these elements of national context and policies, he said, must lead us to ask how they will contribute towards sustainable development.

The event ended with an open plenary where civil society actors were given the chance to ask questions to the panelists.

The full event recording is available here.#

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PHOTO GALLERY: CPDE co-hosted UN HLPF Side Event on Resilient Recovery

15. Juli 2022 - 11:19

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE), in partnership with the Awaz Centre for Development Services, Action for Sustainable Development (A4SD), the Global Call to Action for Poverty, the Cameroon Youths and Students Forum for Peace (CAMYOSFOP), and the Kevoy Community Development Institute (KCDI) Jamaica, successfully conducted a side event at the UN High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) titled Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) last 14 July 2022.

The activity featured two panel sessions:

Session 1: Perspectives from Member States on inclusive VNRs

Government of Pakistan: Professor Ahsan Iqbal, Federal Minister, Ministry of  Planning, Development & Special Initiatives

Government of Ghana: Dr. Kodjo Mensah-Abrampa, Director General of the National Development Planning Commission of Ghana

Government of Switzerland: Ms. Andrina Frey, Deputy of the Delegate of the Swiss Government for the 2030 Agenda

Government of Cameroon: Dr. Thomas Njie Kingue, Ministry of Economy Planning and Regional Development (MINEPAT)

Government of Montenegro: Ms. Aneta Kankaraš, Head of the Office for Sustainable Development

Government of Greece: Mrs Pavlina Spandoni, Senior Social Policy Advisor at Presidency of Government of Greece

Session 2: Civil Society Coalitions- Looking ahead after the VNRs

 Pakistan – Chaudhry Muhammad Shafique, Pakistan Development Alliance

Switzerland – Laura Ebneter, Alliance Sud

Cameroon – Eugine Ngalim, CAMYOSFOP

Greece – Constantinos Machairas, the Hellenic Platform

The event was moderated by Oli Henman of Action for Sustainable Development, and Josefina Villegas of CPDE

To read the CPDE’s VNR study, visit this page. Recordings will also be made available later on CPDE’s YouTube account.#

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PHOTO GALLERY: CPDE co-hosted UN HLPF Side Event on Resilient Recovery

15. Juli 2022 - 6:38

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE), in partnership with the Awaz Centre for Development Services, Action for Sustainable Development (A4SD), the Global Call to Action for Poverty, the Cameroon Youths and Students Forum for Peace (CAMYOSFOP), and the Kevoy Community Development Institute (KCDI) Jamaica, successfully conducted a side event at the UN High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) titled Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) last 14 July 2022.

The activity featured two panel sessions:

Session 1: Perspectives from Member States on inclusive VNRs

Government of Pakistan: Professor Ahsan Iqbal, Federal Minister, Ministry of  Planning, Development & Special Initiatives

Government of Ghana: Dr. Kodjo Mensah-Abrampa, Director General of the National Development Planning Commission of Ghana

Government of Switzerland: Ms. Andrina Frey, Deputy of the Delegate of the Swiss Government for the 2030 Agenda

Government of Cameroon: Dr. Thomas Njie Kingue, Ministry of Economy Planning and Regional Development (MINEPAT)

Government of Montenegro: Ms. Aneta Kankaraš, Head of the Office for Sustainable Development

Government of Greece: Mrs Pavlina Spandoni, Senior Social Policy Advisor at Presidency of Government of Greece

Session 2: Civil Society Coalitions- Looking ahead after the VNRs

 Pakistan – Chaudhry Muhammad Shafique, Pakistan Development Alliance

Switzerland – Laura Ebneter, Alliance Sud

Cameroon – Eugine Ngalim, CAMYOSFOP

Greece – Constantinos Machairas, the Hellenic Platform

The event was moderated by Oli Henman of Action for Sustainable Development, and Josefina Villegas of CPDE

To read the CPDE’s VNR study, visit this page. Recordings will also be made available later on CPDE’s YouTube account.#

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CPDE to launch 2022 study on implementation of the SDGs

13. Juli 2022 - 6:03

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE) invites everyone to the launch of its 2022 study on voluntary national reviews (VNRs) and the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on 13 July at 2pm in New York and 8pm in Paris.

Each year, CPDE conducts an online survey to assess civil society’s perspectives on how the 2030 Agenda’s VNRs are being implemented at the national level. The 2022 survey is its sixth edition (see reports here).

The questionnaire is structured around the principles of effective development cooperation: national ownership of development priorities, inclusive partnerships, transparency and accountability, and a focus on results. It also assesses whether governments have included reports on SDG 5 c.1, as well as on the impacts of Covid-19, as well as reports on actions taken to respond to the pandemic.

Through this exercise, CPDE aims to provide a space for data collection, a collective vision and concrete proposals on how national level VNR processes are conducted and could be developed. The platform hopes that this contribution of civil society, as key development actors, will improve the implementation of the 2030 Agenda from a development effectiveness perspective.

Join the event via this link. #

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INVITATION: The Paradox of Partnership: The People’s Perspective on SDG 17 and Agenda 2030

11. Juli 2022 - 9:02

The Reality of Aid-Asia Pacific (RoA-AP), Asia Pacific Research Network (APRN), Centre for Research and Advocacy- Manipur (CRAM), and CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness-Asia (CPDE Asia) are hosting a virtual side event at the United Nations High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) on 12 July 2022, 7:30AM NY | 5PM IST | 7:30PM Manila.

The activity aims to reflect on the true essence of partnership as promoted by Agenda 2030 through SDG 17 by discussing key themes in the Asia-Pacific region, such as sufficient and appropriate financing, genuine mechanisms for multi-stakeholder partnerships, and the people’s alternatives beyond the current framework of development.

It will feature representatives from civil society organizations, people’s movements, and grassroots sectors from the region to share their insights and alternatives to ensure a people-centered, rights-based, and climate-resilient future for all.

Sign up via this link.

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INVITATION: The Paradox of Partnership: The People’s Perspective on SDG 17 and Agenda 2030

11. Juli 2022 - 7:56

Event happens 12 July 2022 | 7:30AM NY | 5PM IST | 7:30PM Manila

 

The Reality of Aid-Asia Pacific (RoA-AP), Asia Pacific Research Network (APRN), Centre for Research and Advocacy- Manipur (CRAM), and CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness-Asia (CPDE Asia) are hosting a virtual side event at the United Nations High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) on 12 July 2022, 7:30AM NY | 5PM IST | 7:30PM Manila.

The activity aims to reflect on the true essence of partnership as promoted by Agenda 2030 through SDG 17 by discussing key themes in the Asia-Pacific region, such as sufficient and appropriate financing, genuine mechanisms for multi-stakeholder partnerships, and the people’s alternatives beyond the current framework of development.

It will feature representatives from civil society organizations, people’s movements, and grassroots sectors from the region to share their insights and alternatives to ensure a people-centered, rights-based, and climate-resilient future for all.

Sign up via this link.

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SAVE THE DATE: UN HLPF side event “Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the VNRs”

8. Juli 2022 - 9:37

14 July 2022 | 7:30AM EST

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE), in partnership with the Awaz Centre for Development Services, Action for Sustainable Development (A4SD), the Cameroon Youths and Students Forum for Peace (CAMYOSFOP), and the Kevoy Community Development Institute (KCDI) Jamaica, is holding a side event at the UN High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) titled Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs), to be held 14 July 2022, 7:30 to 9AM EST.

The organisers believed that the Voluntary National Reviews provide a crucial opportunity to evaluate and assess progress in the delivery of the SDGs and the wider 2030 Agenda. However, they argue that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive disruption, impacting on health, education, gender equality and access to finance, leading to significantly widening gaps of inequality.

The session will include key case studies of ‘whole of society’ engagement in the VNR process from key VNR countries, including insights from governments and also civil society coalitions active on developing civil society spotlight reports to shine a light on diverse views on the critical steps needed for transformative change in the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Speakers include:

  • Government of Switzerland: Jacques Ducrest, Delegate of the Federal Council for the 2030 Agenda;
  • Government of Ghana: Dr. Richard Bofah, Deputy Director, Development Policy and Planning Division, National Development Planning Commission of Ghana;
  • Government of Cameroon: Thomas Njie Kingue, Ministry of Economy Planning and Regional Development (MINEPAT);
  • Government of Pakistan: Senior representative, and
  • National CSO coalitions of civil society including:
    • Pakistan
    • Switzerland
    • Ghana
    • Cameroon
    • Greece
    • Jamaica

The activity happens at the UN Headquarters Conference Room A, possibly to be shown live via Zoom. Please sign up via this link so we can provide updates. #

Kategorien: english, Ticker

SAVE THE DATE: UN HLPF side event “Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the VNRs”

8. Juli 2022 - 5:38

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness (CPDE), in partnership with the Awaz Centre for Development Services, Action for Sustainable Development (A4SD), the Cameroon Youths and Students Forum for Peace (CAMYOSFOP), and the Kevoy Community Development Institute (KCDI) Jamaica, is holding a side event at the UN High-Level Political Forum (UN HLPF) titled Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs), to be held 14 July 2022, 7:30 to 9AM EST.

The organisers believed that the Voluntary National Reviews provide a crucial opportunity to evaluate and assess progress in the delivery of the SDGs and the wider 2030 Agenda. However, they argue that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to massive disruption, impacting on health, education, gender equality and access to finance, leading to significantly widening gaps of inequality.

The session will include key case studies of ‘whole of society’ engagement in the VNR process from key VNR countries, including insights from governments and also civil society coalitions active on developing civil society spotlight reports to shine a light on diverse views on the critical steps needed for transformative change in the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Speakers include:

  • Government of Switzerland: Jacques Ducrest, Delegate of the Federal Council for the 2030 Agenda;
  • Government of Ghana: Dr. Richard Bofah, Deputy Director, Development Policy and Planning Division, National Development Planning Commission of Ghana;
  • Government of Cameroon: Thomas Njie Kingue, Ministry of Economy Planning and Regional Development (MINEPAT);
  • Government of Pakistan: Senior representative, and
  • National CSO coalitions of civil society including:
    • Pakistan
    • Switzerland
    • Ghana
    • Cameroon
    • Greece
    • Jamaica

The activity happens at the UN Headquarters Conference Room A, possibly to be shown live via Zoom. Please sign up via this link so we can provide updates. #

The post SAVE THE DATE: UN HLPF side event “Towards a resilient recovery and leaving no one behind in the VNRs” appeared first on CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

SAVE THE DATE: Left behind orphan: financing women’s rights and gender equality

4. Juli 2022 - 12:21

The CPDE Feminist Group invites everyone to join a UN High-Level Political Forum side event it is holding, titled Left behind orphan: Financing women’s rights and gender equality happening 6 July 2022, 7:30-9AM EST.

Co-organised with the Forum of Women’s NGOs of Kyrgyzstan, NETRIGHT Ghana, Coordinadora de la Mujer Bolivia, Commonwealth Medical Trust (Commat) United Kingdom, Gender Centru Moldova, and CSEND Geneva, the event upholds that adequate and effective financing is essential to achieve gender equality and women and girls´ empowerment. Organisers, however, lament that many countries choose to ignore SDG 5.c and its indicator, treating it as a forgotten orphan.

“Much more needs to be done by all development partners: governments, parliaments, national statistical offices, local decision-making bodies, donors and civil society organizations to live up to promises made at the start of the 2030 Agenda,” explained CPDE Feminist Group’s Nurgul Djanaeva.

Join the event via this link. #

 

 

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Kategorien: english, Ticker

CPDE January-June 2022 Newsletter out now

1. Juli 2022 - 8:34

The CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness has released its first newsletter for 2022, covering its engagements from January to June, including the All Secretariats Meeting, its event on climate finance at the Stockholm+50, the kickoff of its 10th anniversary celebrations, and the launch of its capacity development materials for civil society organisations (CSOs).

Download here!

The post CPDE January-June 2022 Newsletter out now appeared first on CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Civil society is struggling with ever worsening framework conditions – all over the world. What do we do about it?

1. Juli 2022 - 3:26

 For civil society to work unchallenged, the international community must demand that governments and companies adhere to the effective development cooperation principles of democratic ownership of development priorities, and transparency and accountability.

Under pressure

Around the world, representatives of civil society have less and less room for manoeuvre. They are subjected to legal proceedings, surveillance, and defamation, or funds are withheld. These attacks by state or state-approved forces on independent development actors, human rights, and democracy, aim to limit the social and political participation of civil society and suppress criticism of systems that favour a few but neglect the majority.

For civil society to work unchallenged, the international community must demand that governments and companies adhere to the effective development cooperation principles of democratic ownership of development priorities, and transparency and accountability.

Civil society must be involved in the design and implementation of development policies and projects. It is the task of civil society to stand united against restrictions – through awareness raising, legal action, and mobilising the general public.

Our platform monitors whether governments are fulfilling their obligation to create an enabling environment for civil society. We also raise awareness, call on national authorities to address gaps in the implementation of the above development principles, and advocate for an end to attacks on human rights defenders through the Belgrade Call to Action.#

The post Civil society is struggling with ever worsening framework conditions – all over the world. What do we do about it? appeared first on CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

SAVE THE DATE: A look into Integrated National Financing Frameworks (INFFs)

28. Juni 2022 - 18:44

Together with the Reality of Aid Africa, Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Development Cooperation, Italy, UNDESA, UNDP, and the Civil Society Financing for Development (FfD) Group, the CSO Partnership on Development Effectiveness (CPDE) is co-organising a virtual side event at the UN High-Level Political (Forum UN HLPF).

Titled A look into Integrated National Financing Frameworks: Ensuring ownership and alignment with national development priorities, the event happens on 5 July 2022, 7:30AM New York and is available in English, Spanish, and French.

Highlights include presentations and discussions on the overview of INFFs and its approach, survey, and facility by the UN DESA and UNDP, civil society views on the Review of Guidance Material by the CSO FfD Group/CPDE, the INFF G20 framework, implementing country government national experience, and national CSO perspective on INFF implementation.

To register for the event, visit this link.#

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Kategorien: english, Ticker

The precarity of ODA budgets in times of crisis

24. Juni 2022 - 11:03

There is an emerging constant in the world of development cooperation: if a crisis emerges, the official development assistance (ODA) is reliably there to soften the impact. But at what cost and to whom?

In these last few years of crisis after crisis, we have witnessed two distinct phenomena when it comes to ODA budgets – inflation and diversion. The COVID-19 pandemic and the distribution of excess vaccines being counted as ODA has made ODA figures look much greater than they are.  More recently, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and the resulting refugee crisis has some providers reallocating existing resources as opposed to increasing them. The consequences for Low-Income Countries who depend on ODA in some cases for up to two-thirds of external development financing cannot be understated.

Susanna Moorehead, Chair of the OECD Development Assistance Committee recently said, “Multiple crises mean multiple demands on ODA. ODA must support people in need in all partner countries – those forced to flee because of conflict, those who are hungry and those who are particularly poor and vulnerable, especially women and children who suffer most.” ODA remains the most stable form of external finance to developing countries and its integrity and purpose must be safeguarded.

When the OECD-DAC released its ODA Figures for 2021, there was some relief that ODA had increased to an all-time high. This relief was only due to the earlier perceived risk that ODA might contract as a consequence of changes in country GNI levels being hampered by the pandemic. Yet, the numbers are still far off from the 0.7% commitment and nowhere near the levels needed to meet demands of the moment. CSOs argue that the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, geopolitical, conflict and climate crises, requires the DAC community to considerably increase its ODA levels.

Unfortunately, what we are seeing, when there is fresh urgency to deliver on ODA commitments, are providers missing the mark. Amid the war in Ukraine, some governments have given indications that support to refugees will come at the expense of ODA budgets. This is by no means a way to suggest that Ukrainians fleeing a heinous act of aggression by the Russian government should not be supported, but rather to insist that ODA budgets are not sacrificed.

Beyond the immediate support to refugees and the impact this will have on ODA, in the medium- to long-term significant resources are also likely to support reconstruction efforts. This will have possible implications to public budgets with governments indicating that they will be heightening defense spending as a result of the invasion.

CPDE, and civil society organisations (CSOs) in general, are sounding the alarm bells about the impact of these short-sighted measures on the medium- and long-term development outlooks for countries highly dependent upon ODA. The sustainable development goals (SDGs) were already off-track and under threat due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Further cuts to development financing only worsen the world’s odds of delivering the Agenda 2030. #

Photo by Ichsan Wikacsono from Unsplash

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Kategorien: english, Ticker

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