Sie sind hier

Ticker

The French response to the Corona Crisis: semi-presidentialism par excellence

DIE - 19. Januar 2038 - 4:14

This blog post analyses the response of the French government to the Coronavirus pandemic. The piece highlights how the semi-presidential system in France facilitates centralized decisions to manage the crisis. From a political-institutional perspective, it is considered that there were no major challenges to the use of unilateral powers by the Executive to address the health crisis, although the de-confinement phase and socio-economic consequences opens the possibility for more conflictual and opposing reactions. At first, approvals of the president and prime minister raised, but the strict confinement and the reopening measures can be challenging in one of the European countries with the highest number of deaths, where massive street protests, incarnated by the Yellow vests movement, have recently shaken the political scene.

Kategorien: Ticker

Shifting policies for systemic change - Lessons from the global COVID-19 crisis

#2030Agenda.de - vor 13 Minuten 38 Sekunden

New York, 18 September 

The COVID-19 crisis and the worldwide measures to tackle it have deeply affected communities, societies and economies around the globe. The implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has been put at high risk in many countries. COVID-19 is a global wake-up call for enhanced international cooperation and solidarity.

But calls for “building back better” by just pushing the reset button will not change the game. We need structural changes in societies and economies that ensure the primacy of human rights, gender justice and sustainability.

This is the key message of the 2020 edition of the Spotlight Report on Sustainable Development “Shifting policies for a systemic change.” It is published by a broad range of civil society organizations today – on the eve of the Global Action Week for the SDGs and three days before UN`s 75th (virtual) anniversary summit.

The Spotlight Report 2020 unpacks various features and amplifiers of the COVID-19 emergency and its inter-linkages with other crises. The report points out that even before COVID-19, many countries – especially in the global South - were in an economic crisis, characterized by contractionary fiscal policy, growing debt

Kategorien: Ticker

From 2020 HLPF to the first annual “SDG Moment”

Global Policy Watch - vor 5 Stunden 54 Minuten

Download UN Monitor #20 (pdf version).

By Elena Marmo

The first annual SDG Moment is set to take place on 18 September 2020, designed to reinvigorate efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Marking the last decade in which to achieve these goals, the moment will: “Set out a vision for a Decade of Action and recovering better from COVID-19; Provide a snapshot on SDG progress; Highlight plans and actions to tackle major implementation gaps; and Demonstrate the power and impact of action and innovation by SDG stakeholders.”

Highlighting this first SDG moment at the close of the HLPF in July, Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed stated, “We hope to generate greater momentum, solutions and solidarity to address the massive implementation gaps that we are all so keenly aware of.” At the event on 18 September, Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will present his “Vision for Decade of Action”. He gave a preview perhaps at the HLPF, saying:

“The COVID-19 crisis is having devastating impacts because of our past and present failures. Because we have yet to take the SDGs seriously. Because we have put up with inequalities within and between countries that have left billions of people just one crisis away from poverty and financial ruin. Because we haven’t invested adequately in resilience – in universal health coverage; quality education; social protection; safe water and sanitation. Because we have yet to right the power imbalances that leave women and girls to constantly bear the brunt of any crisis. Because we haven’t heeded warnings about the damage that we are inflicting on our natural environment. Because of the shocking risks we are taking with climate disruption. And because we have undervalued effective international cooperation and solidarity.”

The first SDG Moment sets its sights high and needs to address a number of concerns about the future of the 2030 Agenda were raised at the HLPF.

Leave no one behind?

The term, “Leave no one behind” has become an official slogan of the 2030 Agenda. Multiple statements of efforts to be inclusive, while welcome, are selective and neglect many disadvantaged groups, and ignore the dynamics, policies and practices that push many behind. At a HLPF side event on national reporting on the 2030 Agenda, Committee for Development Policy (CDP) member Sakiko Fukuda-Parr said: “most voluntary national reports mention leave no one behind, (45 out of the 47) but it’s the depth of that principle we are concerned about with only seven recognizing what policies might be pushing people behind.”

To push no one behind requires that Member States examine not only their efforts of inclusion, but also policies and practices that may be effectively excluding or pushing groups behind, both within their national borders and in terms of extraterritorial responsibilities. This links to a broader discussion on reducing inequalities between and within countries. The Secretary-General’s 2020 SDG Progress Report noted that “progress had either stalled or been reversed: the number of people suffering from hunger was on the rise; climate change was occurring much faster than anticipated; and inequality continued to increase within and among countries”.

Belgium observed that the commitment to leaving no one behind without detail or an inequality framing would fail as “successfully fighting climate change will require us to ensure that the transition is just, or we risk leaving people behind”. To that point, the European Union also noted: “Building back better is the first task of the Decade of Action. We have to join our forces to accelerate the implementation of the SDGs to achieve a transformative shift by 2030 that leaves no one behind.” How will Member States use the SDG Moment and Decade of Action to promote policies that curtail action pushing populations and countries behind?

Worsening inequalities—change measurement?

COVID-19’s socio-economic effects have raised a myriad of issues related to inequalities. In particular, SDG 10 to reduce inequalities within and among countries permeated discussions from digital technologies to macroeconomic recovery.

At an HLPF session on mobilizing international solidarity, accelerating action and embarking on new pathways to realize the 2030 Agenda and the Samoa Pathway, Barbados called on all Member States to “pay more attention to this notion of vulnerability. It’s not about GDP per capita, [rather] what is our capacity to absorb new technology, composition of our population, levels of education and skills that allows us … to really take advantage of the resources that we have?”

This was echoed by Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Africa, Vera Songwe, who noted: “the importance of changing our classification during this crisis…if we stay within our traditional sort of GDP per capita definitions of the crisis we will not be addressing the countries.” How will the SDG Moment and Decade of Action build on these calls and usher in an understanding of vulnerability to the 2030 Agenda?

Multilateralism or Multi-stakeholderism

As the effects of COVID-19 reverse progress made on the SDGs, conversations regarding financing and implementation of the 2030 Agenda have heightened urgency. However, rather than a robust multilateral effort to establish fiscal space for the public sector, Member States have turned once again to the private sector for support. Without clarification on related responsibilities, the unconditional or unqualified inclusion of the private sector and multinational companies shifts multilateralism to multi-stakeholderism, and risks bypassing people-centred and human rights-based multilateralism and related standards of accountability and universality.

Secretary-General Guterres urged Member States:

“We must also reimagine the way nations cooperate. The pandemic has underscored the need for a strengthened and renewed multilateralism: A multilateralism based on the powerful ideals and objectives enshrined in the Charter and in the agreements defined across the decades since…We need a networked multilateralism…And we need an inclusive multilateralism, drawing on the critical contributions of civil society, business, foundations, the research community, local authorities, cities and regional governments.”

At an HLPF session on financing the 2030 Agenda amid COVID-19, Ibrahim Mayaki from NEPAD emphasized that “no man is an island, no country is on its own. Africa as a continent is affected by global imperatives, good or not…Resilience alone without a holistic approach to well-being and broader development needs is counter-productive.”  This recognition of the interdependence of countries reflects a necessary distinction between “shared” responsibilities and the notion of solidarity. The “global imperatives” caused by climate change, cross-border trade, illicit finance and tax cooperation reflect the need for international co-operation and solidarity.

In the 2020 Spotlight Report on Sustainable Development, Barbara Adams notes: “Multilateral solidarity is gaining traction as the slogan for mobilizing support for international cooperation and for the UN. Is it replacing or merely renaming cross-border obligations, many of which have been enshrined over decades in UN treaties, conventions and agreements, and the principle of common but differentiated responsibility in their implementation?”

Beyond Building Back Better

The phrase “Build Back Better”, applied by Secretary-General Guterres to the context of climate change, took hold at the HLPF, with many Member States, UN Staff, and civil society organizations calling for development action to make this possible, as well as asking if what is needed is rather to build back differently.

Isabelle Durant, Deputy Secretary-General of UNCTAD remarked: “I’m tired of hearing building back better. What is better? We need to build back differently, more diversified economies, greener, more inclusive. Who are we building back better for? Big economies, for profit, and big business, or for sustainable development?”

Guyana on behalf the of the G77 and Belize agreed. Belize states that building back better, "for SIDS is not going back to what they had. When we were encouraged to diversify our countries and markets we took what we were really good at and exchanged it for something else, not a true diversification."

However, the United Kingdom was an early proponent of the idea, noting, "we must not be consumed by the challenge alone; we must use this as an opportunity to rebuild better. This is the moment to shape a recovery that delivers cleaner, healthier, more inclusive and more resilient economies and societies.” The European Union echoed this sentiment, stating: “Building back better is the first task of the Decade of Action.”

Germany highlighted concerns regarding the SDGs, noting: “Instead of falling behind in the implementation of the SDGs, we must think about how we restart our economies in a way that will accelerate implementation.” The United Kingdom posed the SDGs as a roadmap for recovery “that puts the 2030 agenda for sustainable development and the goals of the Paris Agreement back within reach as we collectively rise to the challenge of the decade of action”.

Pakistan noted the role COVID-19 can play in rebuilding not only better but differently, saying that COVID-19 “has exacerbated the systemic risks and fragilities in our economic and financial systems and development models. It has also highlighted the cascading impact of disasters crossing economic, social, environmental, dimensions of sustainable development, and affecting all countries, especially developing countries."

The COVID-19 crisis has heightened, not diminished the urgency for action on the SDGs. As stated by the President of ECOSOC: “Our development gains are at risk of being reversed in the very year when we launched a Decade of Action and Delivery to accelerate the implementation the Sustainable Development Goals.” While COVID-19 has massively disrupted economies, health systems and social protection worldwide, Member States continue to invest trust and support in the 2030 Agenda. However ambitious and essential its SDGs may be, it lacks an accountability mechanism to get them back on track.

Secretary-General speaks out

Just two days after the HLPF came to a close, Secretary-General Guterres, delivering the Nelson Mandela lecture, called for major reform to the UN Security Council, the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, saying:

“COVID-19 has been likened to an x-ray, revealing fractures in the fragile skeleton of the societies we have built. It is exposing fallacies and falsehoods everywhere: The lie that free markets can deliver healthcare for all; the fiction that unpaid care work is not work; the delusion that we live in a post-racist world; the myth that we are all in the same boat. Because while we are all floating on the same sea, it’s clear that some are in super-yachts while others are clinging to drifting debris…. Inequality defines our time.”

He added: "The response to the pandemic, and to the widespread discontent that preceded it, must be based on a New Social Contract and a New Global Deal that create equal opportunities for all and respect the rights and freedoms of all. This is the only way that we will meet the goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Paris Agreement and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda – agreements that address precisely the failures that are being exposed and exploited by the pandemic.”

With eyes focused on the first annual SDG Moment to “set out a vision for a Decade of Action and recovering better from COVID-19”, how will Member States respond to calls to go beyond implementation gaps to tackle systemic failures, the need to do things differently, and to reinvigorate the multilateral system?

The post From 2020 HLPF to the first annual “SDG Moment” appeared first on Global Policy Watch.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

„Meine Erfahrungen mit COVID-19“: Schwestern-Ärztin aus Indien berichtet

Misereor - 17. September 2020 - 17:53
Die indische Schwestern-Ärztin Dr. Beena Madhavat berichtet von ihrem Einsatz gegen die Corona-Pandemie, den schmerzlichen Efahrungen und ihrer Freude, Leiden zu lindern.

Weiterlesen

Der Beitrag „Meine Erfahrungen mit COVID-19“: Schwestern-Ärztin aus Indien berichtet erschien zuerst auf MISEREOR-BLOG.

Kategorien: Ticker

PRESS RELEASE: Launch of the global civil society report Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2020

Global Policy Watch - 17. September 2020 - 15:41

PRESS RELEASE: Launch of the global civil society report Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2020.
On the eve of the (virtual) United Nations 75th anniversary event

Pushing the reset button will not change the game

New York, 18 September 2020. The COVID-19 crisis and the worldwide measures to tackle it have deeply affected communities, societies and economies around the globe. The implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has been put at high risk in many countries. COVID-19 is a global wake-up call for enhanced international cooperation and solidarity.

But calls for “building back better” by just pushing the reset button will not change the game. We need structural changes in societies and economies that ensure the primacy of human rights, gender justice and sustainability.

This is the key message of the 2020 edition of the Spotlight Report on Sustainable Development “Shifting policies for a systemic change.” It is published by a broad range of civil society organizations today – on the eve of the Global Action Week for the SDGs and three days before UN`s 75th (virtual) anniversary summit.

The Spotlight Report 2020 unpacks various features and amplifiers of the COVID-19 emergency and its inter-linkages with other crises. The report points out that even before COVID-19, many countries – especially in the global South – were in an economic crisis, characterized by contractionary fiscal policy, growing debt and austerity measures that made these countries more vulnerable to future crises. They are results of a dysfunctional system that puts corporate profit above the rights and well-being of people and planet.

Governments and international organizations have responded to the COVID-19 crisis on a massive scale. The announced liquidity measures, rescue packages and recovery programmes total US$ 11 trillion worldwide. But overall, most measures were not sufficient to meet people’s real financial needs and did not take environmental justice into account.

A true alternative: the “8 R”- agenda for transformational recovery

According to the Spotlight Report, it is therefore all the more important that longer-term reforms not only support economic recovery, but also promote necessary structural change which will decisively improve peoples’ lives, such as strengthened public social protection systems, improved remuneration and rights of workers in the care economy, and the transition to circular economies, which seek to decouple growth from consumption of finite planetary resources.

As an alternative to the “Great Reset” initiative launched by the World Economic Forum to supposedly rescue capitalism, the Spotlight Report offers the “8 R”- agenda for transformational recovery. It identifies 8 key political and social areas in which re-thinking and re-structuring is indispensable, including the need for reclaiming truly public services and revaluing the central importance of care in our societies; decisively shifting the balance between local and global value chains; pursuing climate justice; a radical redistribution of economic power and resources and bold regulation of global finance for the common good;  and – underpinning this all – boosting multilateral solidarity and multilateralism by clearly strengthening the UN and its bodies.

“Multiple crises can only be overcome if the massive power asymmetries within and between societies can be reduced”, the authors conclude.

Download the Press Release (pdf version) here.

More details of the “8 R” – agenda can be found here.

The Spotlight Report is published by the Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND), the Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR), Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN), Global Policy Forum (GPF), Public Services International (PSI), Social Watch, Society for International Development (SID), and Third World Network (TWN), supported by the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung.

Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2020
Shifting policies for systemic change – Lessons from the global COVID-19 crisis
Global Civil Society Report on the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs
Beirut/Bonn/Ferney-Voltaire/Montevideo/New York/Penang/Rome/Suva, September 2020
www.2030spotlight.org
#SpotlightSDGs

For media requests, interviews with the authors or further questions please contact:

Monika Hoegen
Global Policy Forum Europe
Coordinator for Media Relations and Strategic Communication
Phone: +49(0)171-837-3462
Email: monikahoegen@globalpolicy.org

Some quotes from the Spotlight Report 2020:

“Governments and international organizations have responded to COVID-19 on an unprecedented scale. But there are indications that policy responses to the crisis so far ignore its structural causes, favour the vested interests of influential elites in business and society, further accelerate economic concentration processes, fail to break the vicious circle of indebtedness and austerity policies, and in sum, widen socioeconomic disparities within and between countries.”
Jens Martens, Global Policy Forum

“The social and economic consequences of COVID-19 are not an exogenous shock to an otherwise functioning system, but the consequences of a system that has instability and inequality hardwired into its DNA. We must move towards an economy that rests on ensuring human wellbeing and the realisation of rights.”
Carilee Osborne and Pamela Choga, Institute for Economic Justice, South Africa

“International solidarity is needed in the form of a Global Fund for Social Protection to jointly realize the human right to social security for all.”
Nicola Wiebe, Mira Bierbaum, Thomas Gebauer, Global Coalition for Social Protection Floors

“The essence of the change that is needed involves shifting the centre of gravity away from the global and take bold public policy and investment decisions to strengthen the domestic economies.”
Stefano Prato, Society for International Development

“The pandemic is galvanizing an ever-increasing array of actors to imagine how our economies could be reshaped if human rights and human dignity were put at their center, and to work together to make that vision a reality.”
Kate Donald, Ignacio Saiz, Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR)

“The UN has a rich and full envelope of vital and worthy commitments and obligations. Reiteration after 75 years is not enough. A new funding compact is a sine qua non to move these commitments into the reality of people’s lives.”
Barbara Adams, Global Policy Forum

The post PRESS RELEASE: Launch of the global civil society report Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2020 appeared first on Global Policy Watch.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Fluchtdokumentation auf der Hamburger Klimawoche

Engagement Global Presse - 17. September 2020 - 15:20
Der Film Barca ou Bassa dokumentiert ökologische und ökonomische Gründe für die Flucht von Menschen aus Westafrika nach Europa. Foto: Pixabay

In Kooperation mit der Hamburger Klimawoche zeigt Engagement Global am Mittwoch, 23. September 2020, um 17 Uhr den Film Barca ou Bassa (Barcelona oder Tod) im Hauptzelt der Klimawoche auf dem Hamburger Rathausplatz.

Der Dokumentarfilm geht der Frage nach, warum Menschen ihre Heimat verlassen, um sich auf die gefährliche Reise nach Europa zu machen. Die afrikanischen Expertinnen und Experten, die hauptsächlich zu Wort kommen, zeigen sowohl ökologische und ökonomische Gründe für die Abwanderungen der Menschen aus Westafrika nach Europa als auch die Bedeutung geopolitischer Zusammenhänge auf. Die Migrationsgeschichte zweier Brüder, die ihre Heimatinsel Niodior vor der Küste Senegals verlassen, steht exemplarisch im Mittelpunkt des Films.

Nach der Filmvorführung führt ZDF-Moderatorin Jana Pareigis ein Gespräch mit dem Regisseur Peter Heller, der weitere Einblicke in die Entstehungsgeschichte und den Kontext der Dokumentation gibt.

Ab 19 Uhr spricht Jana Pareigis mit Hannes Jaenicke, Schauspieler, Umweltaktivist und Bestsellerautor, am selben Ort über das Thema „Die Macht jedes Menschen die Welt nachhaltiger zu machen!“. Jaenicke gibt dabei Einblicke, wie Menschen durch eigenes Engagement und überlegte Konsumentscheidungen dazu beitragen können, das eigene Leben nachhaltiger zu gestalten und den 17 Zielen für nachhaltige Entwicklung näher zu kommen.

Die Anmeldung zu den öffentlichen Veranstaltungen ist ab Montag, 21. September 2020, über die Internetseite der Hamburger Klimawoche möglich.

Die Veranstaltungen werden von der Außenstelle Hamburg von Engagement Global im Rahmen des Programms Entwicklungsbezogene Bildung in Deutschland (EBD) durchgeführt. Ziel des EBD-Programms ist es, Menschen zu einer kritischen Auseinandersetzung mit globalen Entwicklungen zu motivieren und zu eigenem Engagement für eine nachhaltige Entwicklung zu ermutigen.

Hamburger Klimawoche

Die 12. Hamburger Klimawoche findet von Sonntag, 20., bis Sonntag, 27. September 2020 statt. Während der Klimawoche werden in der Hansestadt verschiedene Veranstaltungen rund um das Thema Klimaschutz angeboten.

Weitere Informationen
Kategorien: Ticker

17. September 2020

ONE - 17. September 2020 - 14:48

1.Afrikakorrespondent Bartholomäus Grill im Portrait
Der Deutschlandfunk Kultur portraitiert den Spiegel-Journalisten Bartholomäus Grill, der 40 Jahre seines Lebens auf dem afrikanischen Kontinent verbracht hat. Der ehemalige Zeit-Autor betont, dass es eine „Anmaßung“ sei, über 54 Länder berichten zu wollen. Mit ‚Wir Herrenmenschen‘ habe er jüngst ein Buch veröffentlicht, in dem er sich dafür stark macht, den „kolonialen Blick“ auf Afrika abzulegen. Grill selbst bezeichnet sich als „Afrorealist“. Afrika könne der „Kontinent der Zukunft“ werden, wenn es den Menschen gelinge, sich von den vielen korrupten Staats- und Regierungsoberhäuptern zu lösen. Die Lebensweise in vielen afrikanischen Ländern sei oft nachhaltig und auf die Umwelt bedacht. Daran könne man sich bei uns ein Beispiel nehmen.

2.EU: Vorreiterin der Entwicklungspolitik?
Die Europäische Union muss ihre Entwicklungspolitik auf ein neues Fundament stellen, fordert Werner Hoyer, Präsident der Europäischen Investitionsbank in Luxemburg, in einem Gastbeitrag, der sowohl im Tagesspiegel als auch im Handelsblatt erschienen ist. Die EU benötige eine starke Entwicklungsbank und müsse ferner den Privatsektor stärker in entwicklungspolitische Vorhaben einbeziehen. Außerdem müsse Europa sicherstellen, dass die Einzelprojekte tatsächlich den entwicklungspolitischen Zielen dienen, für die sie konzipiert sind. Globale Probleme soll die EU durch multilaterale Kooperation lösen. Darüber hinaus thematisiert Bernd Riegert in der Deutschen Welle die gestrige Rede zur Lage der Europäischen Union von EU-Kommissionspräsidentin Urusula von der Leyen. Sie sprach sich für Mehrheitsentscheidungen statt dem Einstimmigkeitsprinzip in außenpolitischen Fragen aus sowie für eine strikte Einhaltung der Rechtsstaatlichkeit in allen EU-Staaten. Des Weiteren wolle sie bezüglich der Verteilung von Asylbewerber*innen innerhalb der Europäischen Union einen Kompromiss herbeiführen, einen europaweiten Mindestlohn einführen und eine sichere digitale Identität für EU-Bürger*innen schaffen. Außerdem setze sie auf eine Partnerschaft mit Afrika.

3.Menschenrecht Wasser
Wie die Tageszeitung (taz) berichtet, haben laut dem UN-Kinderhilfswerk UNICEF derzeit zwei Milliarden  Menschen weltweit keinen regelmäßigen Zugang zu sauberem Wasser. Der Zugang zu sauberem Trinkwasser sei bereits 2010 in einer UN-Resolution als Menschenrecht anerkannt worden. Ferner habe die Hälfte der globalen Bevölkerung keine ausreichende Sanitärversorgung. Gerade zu Zeiten der Pandemie bedeute dies eine Gefahr für alle. Ein von der UN-Umweltorganisation gestecktes neues Ziel, das 2025 erreicht werden soll, sei nun, eine Lösung für den so genannten „Rebound-Effekt“ zu finden. Dabei gehe es darum, dass Menschen auch stromabwärt sauberes Wasser aus einem Fluss gewinnen können, auch wenn flussaufwärts viele Menschen über Sanitäranlagen verfügen, die mit dem Fluss verbunden sind.

The post 17. September 2020 appeared first on ONE.

Kategorien: Ticker

Citizens and Civil Society Initiatives Celebrated the Good Life in Wuppertal

SCP-Centre - 17. September 2020 - 13:07

The mini-festival “Place of the Good Life”, held in August 2020 at the Platz der Republik in Wuppertal, brought together citizens and civil society actors in a creative and participatory format. The event marked the launch of a co-creation process towards the Day of the Good Life in Wuppertal, planned for 16 May 2021.

The ongoing pandemic has reminded us about the importance of our close communities and the value of well-connected neighbourhoods. After all, they provide the setting where much of our daily interaction takes place: meetings, discussions and the addressing of shared experiences and challenges.

Three hundred participants from around Wuppertal joined the event and participated in one of the thirty available activities. On big visioning walls, the participants could write and paint their ideas of the good life in Wuppertal.

A bee keeper brought some of his bees to show how honey is produced. Langerfeld blüht auf offered Wuppertal citizens an opportunity to produce seed bombs and green their neighbourhoods. Mechanics from Mirker Schrauber helped visitors to repair their bikes, whereas some learned how to drive a wheelchair with the support of a team from the Else-Lasker Schüler-Schule.

Participation in a panel on the topic of sustainable mobility was facilitated by Mobiles Wuppertal. An exhibition by Kitma and Power of Colour sparked reflections on racism in our daily life and nudged participants to think about how best to overcome it. A solar panel on the ground produced electricity during the festival and visitors could learn from the Bergische Bürgerenergiegenossenschaft how to use these small solar panels on their balconies to produce solar energy at home.

A Yoga and Zumba session added some physical activity. The event was concluded with an international public singing session with English, Turkish and German songs.

The four main topics: mobility, energy and living, nature and food, and togetherness will be the basis of the discussions that will take place in the next events. Following up on the “Place of the Good Life” event, neighbourhood meetings will involve citizens in the Ostersbaum area of Wuppertal in preparing activities for the Day of the Good Life, scheduled for 16 May 2021. In visioning workshops, the project will further collect ideas and actions for the final big event.

The Day of the Good Life is a joint project of the CSCP and its partners, the Nachbarschaftsheim Wuppertal, e.V., Idealwerk and the Forum für Soziale Innovation (FSI) gGmbH.

For further information, please contact Alexandra Kessler.

Der Beitrag Citizens and Civil Society Initiatives Celebrated the Good Life in Wuppertal erschien zuerst auf CSCP gGmbH.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Spotlight-Bericht 2020: Politikwechsel für systemische Veränderungen. Lehren aus der globalen COVID-19-Krise

SID Blog - 17. September 2020 - 13:02

 

ONLINE | Launch of Spotlight Report 2020 - Shifting policies for systemic change. Lessons from the global COVID-19 crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic has a massive impact on the implementation of the SDGs and the fulfilment of human rights. The looming global recession will dramatically increase unemployment, poverty and hunger worldwide. Moreover, the crisis threatens to further deepen discrimination and inequalities. With this virtual launching event, we will present key findings of the report.

Friday, 18 September 2020, 9:00-10:00am EDT

Please register here

 

 


The COVID-19 pandemic has a massive impact on the implementation of the SDGs and the fulfilment of human rights. The looming global recession will dramatically increase unemployment, poverty and hunger worldwide. Moreover, the crisis threatens to further deepen discrimination and inequalities.

In the Declaration on the Commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations, to be adopted on 21 September 2020, Heads of State and Government will promise „to mobilize resources, strengthen our efforts and show unprecedented political will and leadership“ in response to the current crisis.

The call to „build back better“ has become a leitmotif of intergovernmental responses to the crisis. But does „building back“ really lead to the urgently needed systemic change? What kind of policies, strategies and structural changes are necessary to ensure the primacy of human rights, gender justice and sustainability goals in all policy areas?

These questions are discussed in this year's report Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2020. Its fundamental message is that the multiple crises can only be overcome if the massive power asymmetries within and between societies can be reduced.

With this virtual launching event, we will present key findings of the report.

Brief snapshots by

  • Roberto Bissio, Coordinator of Social Watch
  • Ziad Abdel Samad, Executive Director of the Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND)
  • Vanita Mukherjee, Member of the Executive Committee of Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN)

Policy conclusions by

  • Ignacio Saiz, Executive Director of the Center for Economic and Social Rights
  • Barbara Adams, President of Global Policy Forum

Moderator/Facilitator

  • Bodo Ellmers, Director of Sustainable Development Finance, Global Policy Forum Europe
  • Elisabeth Bollrich, Global Economy Expert at Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung

Please register here[scroll down for English version]

Participants will receive the login details for the web conversation one day before the event.

Please find more information on the Spotlight Report here.

Am 25. September 2020 findet das NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn digital statt

SID Blog - 17. September 2020 - 13:00

p {padding-bottom: 1em; margin-top: 0;} body {margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: Arial, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(245,245,245);} a:link {color: black;} a:visited {color: black;} a:hover {color: black;} a:active {color: black;} ul, ol {list-style-position: outside;}

Am 25. September 2020 findet das NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn digital statt. Engagement Global ermöglicht damit allen Interessierten, sich zu vernetzen und eigene Projekte zur Nachhaltigkeit voranzubringen.

Das 5. NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn findet digital statt. Foto: Kolja Matzke

Bonn, 17. September 2020. Vernetzung, Fachwissen und Förderprogramme bietet Engagement Global, um den historischen Begriff der Nachhaltigkeit langfristig und weltweit wirken zu lassen. Unter dieser Prämisse findet auch das NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn digital statt. Am Freitag, 25. September 2020, kommen rund 150 Menschen virtuell zusammen, um Ideen weiterzutragen und Projekte zur Nachhaltigkeit voran zu bringen. Die Bandbreite der Themen reicht von der Förderung von Chancengleichheit über Bildung bis hin zu Klimaschutz.

Beim diesjährigen Barcamp wird Luca Samlidis, Pressesprecher von Fridays for Future Bonn, zu Gast sein. Er wird live vom Klimastreik in der Bonner Innenstadt dazu geschaltet, um das Barcamp zu eröffnen. Luca Samlidis' Rat für alle, die sich für Nachhaltigkeit engagieren wollen, lautet: „Tut es einfach und lasst euch nicht erzählen, dass ihr perfekt sein müsst, um etwas für den Klimaschutz zu tun und politisch etwas einzufordern. Und: Klimaschutz kann und sollte Spaß machen!"  

Dass gemeinsames Engagement wirkt und die Welt in einigen Aspekten lebenswerter geworden ist, zeigt die Zwischenbilanz des Sustainable Development Goals Report 2020 der Vereinten Nationen. Am 25. September 2015 verabschiedeten alle Mitgliedsstaaten der Vereinten Nationen auf dem Gipfeltreffen in New York die Agenda 2030 und mit ihr die 17 Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (Sustainable Development Goals – SDGs). Diesen Zielen hat sich auch Engagement Global verpflichtet und bietet mit dem NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn zum fünften Mal allen die Möglichkeit, ihnen näher zu kommen. Das Barcamp ist ein im Bonner Raum etabliertes Format, das jedes Jahr von rund 150 Menschen selbst gestaltet wird. 

Interessierte Journalistinnen und Journalisten sind herzlich eingeladen, digital an der Veranstaltung teilzunehmen oder nach vorheriger Rücksprache persönlich im Studio in Siegburg vorbei zu kommen, um hinter die Kulissen einer virtuellen Veranstaltung zu blicken. An beiden Orten stehen Ansprechpersonen zur Verfügung.


Zur Website des NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn

The CSR.digital Roadshow: Collaborating for Corporate Digital Responsibility

SCP-Centre - 17. September 2020 - 12:01

In late summer 2020, the team of CSR.digital went on the road. The agenda: conducting small Corporate Digital Responsibility (CDR) workshops with Chambers of Industry and Commerce (IHK) of North Rhine-Westphalia. The goal is to develop a comprehensive concept that can be used by various Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) as a framework for defining their role and action in the field of CDR.

The CSR.digital project created basic workshop formats by locating CDR action fields within a matrix of development. This basic format was tested and expanded at the respective chambers with the direct participation of SMEs.

The kick-off workshop took place in July at the IHK Bonn. Two SME representatives, Sandor Krönert from Tanzhaus Bonn and Holger Schwan from Projektservice Schwan shared experiences regarding their companies’ reaction to the ongoing pandemic. Mr. Krönert talked about their recently developed app for planning dance courses in ways that meet hygiene requirements while fulfilling the courses’ programme. Drawing on such particular examples, the project team and the SME representatives engaged in discussions about the various fields of action in CDR, such as the zero-waste principle, the application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in support of sustainability goals, and the concept of the sharing economy. The participants also looked into areas with the greatest potential for positive impact at the SME level.

During the second workshop, which took place at the premises of IHK Düsseldorf, Thomas Götzen from the construction company Interboden shared more about their project ‘The Cradle’, in which they are using the Cradle-to-Cradle concept for the construction of an office building in Düsseldorf. Such experiences will be shared and discussed with other SMEs in order to find ways of replicating and upscaling them.

CSR.digital is planning to conduct further meetings with all IHK offices in North Rhine-Westphalia and jointly develop a comprehensive workshop concept that can used by SMEs to define their actions in the field of CDR. The next meeting will take place at the IHK Mönchengladbach on 8 October 2020.

CSR.digital – Sustainably Competitive is funded by the Ministry of Economic Affairs NRW via the EFRE fund.

For further information, please contact Anna Hilger.

Der Beitrag The CSR.digital Roadshow: Collaborating for Corporate Digital Responsibility erschien zuerst auf CSCP gGmbH.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Der RhineCleanUp 2020

EINEWELTblabla - 17. September 2020 - 11:54

Seit den 1960er Jahren nimmt die Schadstoffbelastung des Rheines durch Abwasser, Chemikalien und Schwermetalle kontinuierlich ab. Wurden früher noch Witze über die Wasserqualität des Rheines gemacht, suchen die Menschen am Rhein heute wieder die Naherholung. Die Stadt Basel hat sogar mit dem berühmten „Basler Rheinschwimmen“ einen eigenen Volkssport im Rhein kreiert.

Umso wichtiger also, dass der Fluss an sich, aber auch das Flussufer und die angrenzenden Seitenarme sauber gehalten werden. Seit 2018 findet einmal jährlich der RhineCleanUp-Tag statt. Vereine und Gruppen, aber auch Familien und Freunde können eigene CleanUp-Aktionen in ihrem Abschnitt anmelden oder bei angemeldeten Aktionen helfen. Die Idee ist, dass der Rhein an einem Tag, von der Quelle bis zur Mündung, in drei verschiedenen Ländern, von Müll befreit und sauber gemacht wird.

Der Rhein

Ganze 1.232,7 km legt der Rhein auf seinem Weg durch West- und Mitteleuropa zurück und ist somit einer der längsten Flüsse des europäischen Kontinents. Während er sich in der Schweiz, wo er entspringt, wild durch Berge und Täler windet, um dann den Bodensee zu durchfließen, ist er auf seinem Weg durch Deutschland und die Niederlande mehr Verkehrsstraße für Frachter und Ausflugsschiffe, um schließlich in die Nordsee zu münden. Die Verbindungen mit Main und Donau machen eine direkte Fahrt von der Nordsee bis ins Schwarze Meer möglich, weshalb der Rhein auch zu den verkehrsreichsten Wasserstraßen der Welt zählt.

Hochrhein, Oberrhein, Mittelrhein und Niederrhein sind die Abschnitte des Flusses, die das deutsche Landschaftsbild prägen. Metropolregionen wie das Rhein-Main- oder das Rhein-Ruhr-Gebiet, aber auch Städte wie Karlsruhe oder Köln, bieten vielen Menschen in Deutschland eine Heimat, die seit Jahrtausenden vom Rhein geprägt wurde.

Meine Erfahrung beim RhineCleanUp 2020

Am vergangen Samstag, den 12. September 2020, fand in Mainz der diesjährige RhineCleanUp-Tag statt. Weil ich persönlich immer schon am Rhein gelebt habe und den Fluss seit meiner Kindheit kenne, brauchte es nicht lange, um mich von der Aktion zu überzeugen. Mit drei Freund*innen und zwei weiteren Helfer*innen suchte ich ein paar Stunden lang auf einer kleinen Insel im Rhein, wo wir gerne baden gehen, nach Müll und allem was von Natur aus nicht dort hingehört. Obwohl diese Insel Teil eines Naturschutzgebietes im Rhein ist, hatten wir nach den paar Stunden einige Müllsäcke voll zusammen. Von Plastiktüten über Badehosen und alte Schuhe, zu kleinsten Verpackungen und Kronkorken war da alles dabei. Wirklich schade zu sehen, wie wenig Bewusstsein manche Menschen haben. Sie lassen ihren Müll einfach überall liegen, obwohl es eigentlich nicht schwer ist, ihn einfach wieder mit nach Hause zu nehmen und dort zu entsorgen. Später erfuhr ich dann, dass dieses Jahr von 35.000 Helfer*innen den ganzen Rhein entlang ca. 320 Tonnen Müll gesammelt wurde. Ich bin froh auch einen kleinen Teil dazu beigetragen zu haben.

Solche Aktionen können unterschiedlich aussehen und alle Menschen dafür sensibilisieren, mit von ihnen erzeugtem Müll bewusster umzugehen und die eigene Verantwortung zu übernehmen. RiverCleanUp motiviert dazu, weltweit an Aktionen teilzunehmen und verzeichnet alle Aktionen in einer Weltkarte. Dann liegt es noch an der Industrie und der Schifffahrt auch ihren Teil dazu beizutragen.

Ich hoffe, dass auch im nächsten Jahr möglichst viele Menschen am RhineCleanUp teilnehmen. Denn schon ein paar Stunden Müll sammeln reicht, um gemeinsam von der Quelle bis zur Mündung, viel zum Lebensraum Rhein und der Lebensqualität am Rhein beizutragen.

-Selma-

Das Beitragsbild ist von Uli von Mengden.

Der Beitrag Der RhineCleanUp 2020 erschien zuerst auf EineWeltBlaBla.

Kategorien: Ticker

Kinderrechte in Kommunen: „Signale für einen Aufbruch“

Unicef - 17. September 2020 - 10:30
Zum Weltkindertag 2020 hat UNICEF gemeinsam mit der IW Consult die Ergebnisse einer aktuellen Umfrage unter deutschen Städten und Gemeinden veröffentlicht. Welchen Stellenwert hat die Verwirklichung von Kinderrechten in deutschen Städten und Gemeinden heute? Kinderrechte-Experte Dr. Sebastian Sedlmayr gibt uns Antworten.
Kategorien: Ticker

UNICEF-/IW-Umfrage: Kinderfreundlichkeit stärkt Kommunen

Unicef - 17. September 2020 - 10:30
UNICEF und das Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft (IW) stellen anlässlich des Weltkindertags eine Umfrage zur Umsetzung der Kinderrechte in Kommunen vor. 
Kategorien: Ticker

Covid-19 im ländlichen Afrika

ONE - 17. September 2020 - 8:36

Wer schützt diejenigen, die andere schützen?

Jedes Mal, wenn sich Evaline Owuor von ihren Kindern verabschiedet und auf den Weg zur Arbeit macht, geht sie ein Risiko ein. Sie ist Gesundheitshelferin im kenianischen Homa Bay County. In ihrer Gemeinde hat sie mitgeholfen, viele Menschenleben vor Malaria zu schützen. Dann kam Covid-19 und Evaline meldete sie sich sofort, um zu helfen.

Persönliche Schutzausrüstung wie Masken und Handschuhe sind in vielen afrikanischen Ländern nur begrenzt verfügbar. Die Sorge, sich durch ihre Arbeit anzustecken und das neue Virus vielleicht an ihre Familie weiterzugeben, begleitet Evaline täglich. Aber sie weiß, dass sie gebraucht wird, um ihre Gemeinde zu schützen. „Jetzt, wo das neue Virus da ist, mache ich zwei Jobs“, sagt sie während sie ihre Maske zurechtrückt. „Zusätzlich zu Malaria muss ich meinen Leuten helfen, der neuen Pandemie zu entgehen.“

Covid-19 trifft auf andere Epidemien

Covid-19 verbreitet sich in Afrika immer schneller und stellt Gesundheitssysteme auf die Belastungsprobe: Zum einen müssen Menschen vor dem neuen Virus geschützt werden. Gleichzeitig gilt es, die Erfolge in der Eindämmung anderer Infektionskrankheiten zu erhalten.

Jüngste Modellstudien von UNAIDS, WHO und der Stop TB Partnership zeigen, dass Covid-19 bedingte Unterbrechungen von HIV-, Tuberkulose- und Malariaprogrammen in nur 12 Monaten fast zu einer Verdoppelung der Todesfälle aufgrund dieser Krankheiten führen könnten. Vor Ort ist dies bereits sichtbar: Eine alle zwei Wochen durchgeführte Umfrage des Globalen Fonds in 106 Ländern weltweit zeigt, dass Gesundheitsdienste für HIV, Tuberkulose und Malaria vielerorts nur mit großem zusätzlichen Aufwand aufrecht erhalten werden können.

Teil der Gemeinden: Lokale Gesundheitshelfer*innen

Joan Got ist leitende Krankenschwester in der Gesundheitseinrichtung in Evalines Heimat. Sie berichtet, dass die Zahl der Menschen, die zu ihr kommen, drastisch zurückgegangen sei. Covid-19, sagt sie, habe die Gesundheitseinrichtung mit einem Stigma versehen und allein deshalb hätten viele Menschen Angst zu kommen. Mit wachsendem Misstrauen gegenüber formellen Gesundheitseinrichtungen, steigt in ländlichen Gemeinden die Bedeutung angelernter, freiwilliger Gesundheitshelfer*innen in den Gemeinden. Das Vertrauen in sie ist über Jahre gewachsen. Vertrauen, das entscheidend ist, um Menschen mit lebensrettenden Tests, Prävention und Behandlung zu erreichen.

Seit Covid-19 vertrauen die Menschen ihre Gesundheit noch mehr als zuvor Gesundheitshelfer*innen aus ihrer Gemeinde an. Ein Trend, der auch aus anderen Regionen Afrikas bekannt ist: Gesundheitsfachkräfte aus Ghana und Gambia, Nigeria und Mali, Sierra Leone und Senegal berichten von derselben Herausforderung.  Die Pandemie hat die wichtige Rolle, die lokalen Helfer*innen für die Gesundheit im ländlichen Afrika spielen, noch stärker in den Blick gerückt.

Es sind engagierte Menschen wie Evaline, die im Laufe der Jahre die Eindämmung tödlicher Bedrohungen wie Malaria, HIV und Tuberkulose angeführt haben.

Etwa 1 Millionen solcher Gesundheitshelfer*innen auf Gemeindeebene gibt es in den Ländern, mit denen der Globale Fonds in Afrika zusammenarbeitet. Meist sind es Freiwillige, die ein kleines Gehalt bekommen, um Gemeindemitglieder vor Krankheiten zu schützen. Ihr Einsatz rettet Leben und stärkt die Gemeinschaft.

Nun, da sie unmittelbar mit Covid-19 konfrontiert sind, ist ihr eigener Gesundheitsschutz wichtiger denn je. Nur wenn sie geschützt sind, können sie andere schützen – und einen katastrophalen Rückschlag in der Bekämpfung von HIV, TB und Malaria verhindern.

Gesundheitshelfer*innen wie Evaline sind oft angelernt und bekommen für ihr Engagement ein kleines Gehalt. Ihr Einsatz rettet Leben – vor HIV, TBund Malaria und jetzt auch vor Covid-19. © Amref Health Africa / Kennedy Musyoka

Vertrauen und soziales Kapital

Lange wurden Gemeindegesundheitshelfer*innen wie Evaline durch das formelle, staatliche Gesundheitssystem nicht akzeptiert. So wurde ihnen beispielsweise häufig nicht zugetraut, Diagnoseschnelltests richtig durchzuführen. Aber mit der Zeit wurden solche Vorurteile abgebaut. Mit Unterstützung von Amref Health Africa zum Beispiel haben seit 2016 lokale Helfer*innen in Kenia 1,4 Millionen Menschen bei Hausbesuchen auf Malaria getestet, 800.000 Fälle behandelt und Malaria-Prävention unterstützt. Hierdurch ist Malaria in Regionen wie Westkenia inzwischen auf dem Rückzug.

Heute profitieren Millionen Menschen von dem Vertrauen und dem sozialen Kapital, das um die Gesundheitshelfer*innen in ihren Gemeinden entstanden ist. Afrikanische Regierungen bemühen sich inzwischen darum, die lokalen Helfer*innen in die Eindämmung der neuen Pandemie in ländlichen Gemeinden einzubinden. Ein neuer Covid-19-Reaktionsfonds der Afrikanischen Union zielt unter anderem darauf ab, eine Million Gemeindearbeiter*innen und -gesundheitshelfer*innen zur Nachverfolgung von Kontaktpersonen auf dem ganzen Kontinent zu unterstützen. In Südafrika sind 30.000 Helfer*innen von Tür zu Tür gegangen, um Corona-Fälle zu identifizieren – noch bevor die Betroffenen Gesundheitseinrichtungen aufsuchen. In Kenia wurden angesichts steigender Fallzahlen und mangelnder Krankhauskapazitäten mehr als 63.000 lokale Gesundheitshelfer*innen aufgerufen, die häusliche Isolation und Pflegemaßnahmen vor Ort zu unterstützen.

Vor allem in ländlichen Gegenden spielen lokale Gesundheitshelfer*innen eine zentrale Rolle für die Eindämmung von Krankheiten und die Gesundheit der Menschen. © Amref Health Africa / Kennedy Musyoka

Dringend gebraucht: Schutzausrüstung

Doch überall ist die Sorge groß, dass die Infektionszahlen weiter steigen. Es fehlt an spezifischen Trainings, der Mangel an Schutzausrüstung ist katastrophal. Gesundheitshelfer*innen sind damit einem erhöhten Risiko ausgesetzt, sich zu infizieren und die Krankheit unbewusst auf andere zu übertragen.

Evaline und ihre Kolleg*innen sind sich einig: Sie brauchen jetzt mehr Schutzausrüstung – bevor sich die Krankheit sprunghaft ausbreitet und sich das Ansteckungsrisiko für sie selbst, ihre Familien und die Gemeinde noch erhöht. „Wenn wir uns schützen können, können wir diese Pandemie besiegen. Leider müssen wir mit wenig auskommen.“

Mit der Bereitstellung persönlicher Schutzausrüstung trägt der Globale Fonds dazu bei, Gesundheitskräfte und Helfer*innen, die sich an „vorderster Front“ engagieren, zu schützen. Das Ziel ist es mehr zu investieren und damit alle diejenigen vor Covid-19 zu schützen, die, wie Evaline, Menschenleben retten.

Dieser Artikel ist ein Gastbeitrag von dem Globalen Fonds zur Bekämpfung von Aids, Tuberkulose und Malaria.

The post Covid-19 im ländlichen Afrika appeared first on ONE.

Kategorien: Ticker

LivingPANELS: Ein Durchbruch für die Fassadenbegrünung

reset - 17. September 2020 - 5:49
Neuartige "grüne Wände" mit einem speziellen Vegetationsträger und einem vollautomatisches Bewässerungssystem - das ist das Ergebnis eines europäischen Forschungsprojekts. Damit wird die städtische Anpassung an den Klimawandel ein Stück vorangebracht.
Kategorien: Ticker

Belarus: Is There a Way Out of the Crisis?

SWP - 17. September 2020 - 0:00

Belarus is politically deadlocked. The peaceful movement protesting against veteran ruler Alexander Lukashenka and manipulation of the 9 August presidential election is too strong for the state to simply suppress it by force. As long as the political leadership continues to respond with repression the protest movement will persist and diversify. However, it lacks the institutional leverage to realise its demands. Lukashenka can rely on the state apparatus and the security forces, whose loyalty stems in part from fear of prosecution under a new leader. Lukashenka himself is determined to avoid the fate of leaders like Kurmanbek Bakiyev and Viktor Yanukovych, who were driven into exile following “colour revolutions”.

This stalemate is replicated at the international level. While the European Union refuses to recognise the result of the presidential election, the Kremlin regards Lukashenka as the legitimately elected leader. Moscow refuses to talk with the Coordination Council founded by the opposition presidential candidate Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya. The EU, for its part, interacts mainly with representatives of the protest movement because Minsk flatly rejects mediation initiatives from the West. Currently only Moscow regards Lukashenka’s announcement of constitutional reform and early elections as a path out of the political crisis. All other actors dismiss his constitutional initiative as merely an attempt to gain time.

Constitutional reform as a starting point

In fact, a constitutional reform could offer a solution. But it would have to be flanked by confidence-building measures and guarantees. The following aspects should be considered:

  • An end to all forms of violence and repression against peaceful demonstrators; no prosecutions for protest-related offences;
  • Release of all political prisoners, option of return for all exiles and deportees; reinstatement of persons dismissed from state employment;
  • Convocation of a constitutional assembly integrating all relevant political and social groups;
  • Constitutional reform to be completed within a maximum of twelve months;
  • Parallel reform of the electoral code to ensure a transparent election process and appointment of a new Central Election Commission;
  • Free and fair presidential and parliamentary elections in accordance with OSCE criteria. 


The specific details of such a roadmap would have to be clarified in dialogue between the current state leadership and the Coordination Council, with the possibility of both sides agreeing to involve additional societal actors. Mechanisms would be needed to ensure observance. In this regard, granting all state actors an amnesty would be key. At the same time, acts of violence and repression occurring in the past weeks would need to be documented by an independent body. On the model of the truth and reconciliation commissions employed elsewhere, a reappraisal of recent history could lay the groundwork for a moderated process – also involving the churches – to overcome the divisions in society. It would also preserve the possibility of later prosecution if the roadmap was not followed.

What the EU could do

The EU could support such a process by suspending implementation of sanctions as long as implementation of the roadmap is proceeding. It should also prepare a phased plan to support reforms, the economy and civil society; certain aspects would be implemented immediately, with full implementation following conclusion of the constitutional reform and new elections. But the Belarusian actors must be fully in charge of preparing and realising such a roadmap. International institutions should restrict themselves to advising, upon request, on procedural matters. Such a function could for example be assumed by members of the Venice Commission of the Council of Europe.

Moscow might potentially see benefits in such a scenario. The Kremlin’s backing for Lukashenka risks fostering anti-Russian sentiment in Belarus’s traditionally pro-Russian society. In the current situation an extensive integration agreement would be a risky venture for Moscow. Massive Russian subsidies would be needed to cushion the deep economic crisis emerging in Belarus. Moreover, parts of Russian society could respond negatively if Moscow were to intervene politically, economically and possibly even militarily in Belarus. Conversely, an orderly transformation would allow Moscow to minimise such costs. But that would presuppose the Kremlin factoring societies into its calculations.

This approach would demand substantial concessions from all sides. But the alternative – in the absence of dialogue and compromise – is long-term political instability with a growing risk of violent escalation. The European Union should therefore use all available channels of communication to encourage a negotiated solution. It should refrain from supporting Baltic and Polish initiatives to treat Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya as the legitimately elected president of Belarus. That would contradict its approach of not recognising the election result. It would also exacerbate the risk of transforming a genuinely domestic crisis into a geopolitical conflict.

Kategorien: Ticker

Auf dem Prüfstand: Japans neuer Premierminister Yoshihide Suga

SWP - 17. September 2020 - 0:00

Mit klarer Mehrheit hat das japanische Parlament am Mittwoch Yoshihide Suga zum Nachfolger Shinzo Abes gewählt. Der hatte nach rund acht Jahren aus gesundheitlichen Gründen seinen Rücktritt erklärt. Mit seiner bereits am Montag erfolgten Wahl zum Präsidenten der regierende Liberaldemokratische Partei LDP war Suga die Wahl zum Regierungschef schon sicher. Aufgrund seiner Rolle als langjähriger Vertrauter Abes steht er für politische Kontinuität. Auch er selbst definiert die Fortsetzung von Abes Politik als seine »Mission«. Und wie Abe als Regierungschef hat auch Suga mit rund acht Jahren Amtszeit einen Rekord aufgestellt, nämlich den als am längsten amtierenden Chefkabinettssekretär, einem zentralen Posten mit Ministerrang. In dieser Position bewies er Geschick als innenpolitischer Strippenzieher und trug so zur Stabilität der Abe-Regierung bei, deren Sprecher er zugleich war.

Auf der anderen Seite mangelt es Suga aber an außenpolitischer Erfahrung, auch wenn er durch seine Teilnahme an den Sitzungen des Nationalen Sicherheitsrats durchaus mit den strategischen Prioritäten der Abe-Regierung vertraut sein dürfte. Doch gerade hier, in der Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik, muss er sich angesichts Chinas machtpolitischen Auftretens und Nordkoreas militärischer Aufrüstung beweisen.

Mehr als nur Kontinuität gefragt

Wie viel Aufmerksamkeit er der Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik schenken wird, ist allerdings ungewiss. Die Prioritäten für seine Amtszeit hat Suga bereits klargemacht: Er will die Corona-Pandemie bekämpfen und die angeschlagene japanische Wirtschaft ankurbeln. Die enormen außen- und sicherheitspolitischen Herausforderungen lassen sich aber nicht beiseiteschieben. Geschick und Führung wird Suga vor allem in vier Bereichen beweisen müssen.

Erstens muss seine Regierung den künftigen Kurs gegenüber China festlegen, das in Japan als Bedrohung wahrgenommen wird. In den vergangenen Jahren hatte die Abe-Regierung hier sowohl auf eine Politik der Konfrontation als auch der Kooperation gesetzt. So wollte sie sich ein Mindestmaß an bilateraler Stabilität für die wirtschaftliche und politische Zusammenarbeit sichern. Innerhalb der LDP mehren sich die Stimmen, die eine härtere Gangart gegenüber China fordern. Dies wird bestärkt durch Chinas wachsende Präsenz in den Gewässern um die umstrittenen Senkaku-Inseln – die von Japan kontrolliert, aber von China beansprucht werden – sowie das harte Durchgreifen in Hongkong und die Menschenrechtsverstöße gegen die Uiguren. Im Juli verabschiedete die LDP eine Resolution, in der sie die Regierung aufforderte, den für April geplanten, aber durch die Pandemie verschobenen Staatsbesuch Xi Jingpings endgültig abzusagen. Suga muss nun entscheiden, ob er dieser Forderung nachkommen und wie er die Politik gegenüber Beijing insgesamt ausgestalten will.

Zweitens muss Suga schnell ein gutes Verhältnis zum US-Präsidenten Donald Trump aufbauen, denn in Japan besteht Konsens darüber, dass das Sicherheitsbündnis mit den Vereinigten Staaten von zentraler Bedeutung ist. Er muss auf Trump zugehen, gleichzeitig aber auch darauf gefasst sein, dass dieser im November die Präsidentschaftswahlen verliert. Sollte Trump gewinnen, stehen Tokio wohl schwierige Verhandlungen über Japans finanzielle Beiträge zur Stationierung der US-Truppen bevor.  Ein gutes persönliches Verhältnis zu Trump, wie es Abe pflegte, könnte Spannungen in den Verhandlungen abfedern.

Abschreckung und Diplomatie

Drittens stehen in Japans Verteidigungspolitik aufgrund der wachsenden Bedrohung durch nordkoreanische und chinesische Raketen wichtige Entscheidungen an. Zum einen muss Suga über die Weiterentwicklung der japanischen Raketenabwehr entscheiden. Im Juni hatte Verteidigungsminister Taro Kono die geplante Anschaffung des Raketenabwehrsystems »Aegis Ashore« abgesagt. Doch ersatzlos streichen will Tokio das Projekt nicht – deshalb werden nun andere Optionen diskutiert, wie die Anschaffung weiterer Schiffe für die seegestützte Raketenabwehr. Unumstritten sind derart kostspielige Investitionen aber nicht, vor allem weil unklar ist, ob sie gegen Nordkoreas und Chinas wachsende Raketenfähigkeiten überhaupt noch ausreichend Schutz bieten. Deshalb wird in der LDP parallel darüber diskutiert, ob Japan Langstreckenraketen anschaffen sollte, die Vergeltungs- oder möglicherweise sogar Präventivangriffe auf gegnerische Raketenbasen ermöglichen. Einige LDP-Politiker würden die Anschaffung derartiger Waffen gerne in den neuen Nationalen Verteidigungsrichtlinien festschreiben, die bis Ende des Jahres überarbeitet werden sollen. Die Diskussionen darüber lösen in der antimilitaristisch eingestellten Bevölkerung allerdings Unbehagen aus.

Zuletzt wird auch das angespannte Verhältnis zu Südkorea Sugas Fingerspitzengefühl fordern. Tokio und Seoul streiten sich über die Entschädigung ehemaliger Zwangsarbeiter aus der japanischen Kolonialzeit. Nach Tokios Lesart sind die Ansprüche abgegolten – nämlich durch den Grundlagenvertrag von 1965 und das zugehörige Abkommen zur Regelung von Schadensersatzansprüchen. Das Oberste Gericht Südkoreas widerspricht dem und argumentiert, individuelle Ansprüche seien durch den Vertrag nicht erloschen. Der Streit hat beidseitige historische Ressentiments aufflammen lassen, die zu einer Verhärtung der Fronten beigetragen haben. In Südkorea laufen derzeit juristische Prozesse, um von der japanischen Firma Nippon Steel beschlagnahmte Vermögenswerte zu verkaufen und dadurch ehemalige Zwangsarbeiter zu entschädigen. Damit würden die Beziehungen in eine ernsthafte Krise rutschen, denn Tokio hat bereits Vergeltungsmaßnahmen angekündigt.

Turnusgemäß findet die nächste LDP-Präsidentschaftswahl bereits im September 2021 statt. Will er über diesen Zeitpunkt hinaus im Amt bleiben, muss Suga neben innenpolitischen auch außenpolitische Erfolge vorweisen können. Gerade in diesem Bereich hatte sich sein Vorgänger profiliert. Er schaffte es, Japans Stimme auf der internationalen Bühne mehr Gewicht zu verleihen – durch außenpolitische Initiativen oder durch rege Besuchsdiplomatie. Ob Suga den gleichen Aktivismus an den Tag legt, bleibt abzuwarten.

Kategorien: Ticker

UN: Re-inventing multilateral solidarity – rhetoric, or realignment of power?

Global Policy Watch - 16. September 2020 - 20:11

By Barbara Adams

New York, 9 Sep (IPS/Barbara Adams) — Multilateral solidarity is gaining traction as the slogan for mobilizing support for international cooperation and for the UN. Is it replacing or merely renaming cross-border obligations, many of which have been enshrined over decades in UN treaties, conventions and agreements, and the principle of common but differentiated responsibility in their implementation?

Why do we seek another name at this time? It seems that reaffirmation is less attractive than invention in this time of innovation, short-term thinking and results measurement and messaging via social media and 280 characters. How should it be reinvented?

Solidarity assumes trust and common responsibilities.

In the 1980s, Chase Manhattan CEO David Rockefeller said that the economics of international relations drives the politics. Certainly, the politics of international relations has failed to keep pace with globalized economics and has resulted in unfettered hyper-globalization and multi-dimensional inequality and violence.

Decades of structural adjustment, market liberalization and austerity policies, together with financialization and digitalization have propelled the rush to neo-liberal governance. This is characterized by the unwillingness and/or loss of capacity of UN Member States to govern at the national level, and by implication and logic, also at the global level.

The vacuum has been nurtured and "filled" by power centres, public and private. One prominent forum is the World Economic Forum (WEF) that defines itself as "the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation" and asserts: "The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas."1

In June 2019, the UN Secretary-General signed a framework agreement with the WEF, promising multiple areas of cooperation on activities the WEF describes as "shaped by a unique institutional culture founded on the stakeholder theory, which asserts that an organization is accountable to all parts of society.

"The institution carefully blends and balances the best of many kinds of organizations, from both the public and private sectors, international organizations and academic institutions."2

Is this agreement a recognition that stakeholders are replacing public sector representatives and rights holders as the primary "subjects" of multilateralism and the UN?

One of the victims of this (stakeholder) trend is the UN. The pragmatism of Secretaries-General Annan and Ban Ki Moon launched a succession of public-private partnerships and multi-stakeholder initiatives to keep the UN in the multilateral game. Are these what is meant by multilateral solidarity?

If so, how can it be expected to tackle the most serious global challenges that include climate degradation, ballooning inequalities and systemic discriminations, the COVID-19 pandemic and an unsustainable debt burden for many developing countries?

The record of the BWIs/IFIs is not encouraging. The looming debt crisis, exacerbated by COVID-19 and economic lockdowns, is not a unique phenomenon. The failure of IFIs to assess debt sustainability and related fiscal policy according to rights and social, economic and environmental justice obligations is a longstanding practice, one that treats symptoms at best.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development made a valiant effort to connect the dots and the COVID-19 tragedy has forced governments back into the driver’s seat, a role many had relinquished willingly or under pressure.

Climate change and COVID-19 are not the only crises that have exposed the abdication of achieving substantive democratic multilateralism but have been of such dimensions that Member States have to step up and govern. Has the preference of many to partner rather than govern met a dead end?

Re-inventing multilateral solidarity must start with bending the arc of governance back again – from viewing people as shareholders – to stakeholders – to rights holders.

There are many global standards and benchmarks that could be developed to measure this progression. These should be at the forefront of pursuing substantive, rights-based multilateralism and distinguishing it from multilateralism for rhetoric’s sake. Just a few to get started:

  • Vaccines recognized as global public goods.
  • Moratorium on IPRs for health, climate change and indigenous peoples’ rights while going through a review and possible recall process.
  • Ratification and adherence to human rights treaties and conventions.
  • Ratification and adherence to environmental and sustainability treaties.
  • Abdication of nuclear weapons and export of small arms as commitment to peaceful and just societies.
  • Global priority positioning of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to support sustainable livelihoods and strategies for conflict prevention, as well as to evaluate debt sustainability and the quality of financial flows.
  • National oversight and implementation of agreements on business and human rights.
  • New and meaningful commitments to reducing inequalities within and between countries including policies addressing and measuring the concentration of wealth.
  • Cross-border solidarity that is not an excuse for interference or market access.
  • Demotion of GDP as the primary measure of economic progress and prosperity.

Multilateral solidarity relies on trust and requires addressing the trust deficit in the public and private spheres. Solidarity is demonstrated by a commitment to all rights for all and this cannot be achieved or aspired to without an effective duty bearer – government and the public sector. The UN should be the standard bearer at the global level, not a neutral convenor of public and private engagements.

Credible public institutions with commitment and capacity for long-term programming and non-market solutions and responses are essential at all levels.

And this requires predictable and sustainable public resources, currently undermined by tax evasion and illicit financial flows and detoured to servicing undeserved debt burdens.

The necessary but not sufficient condition for multilateral solidarity, the fuel to change direction, is a new funding compact at national level and to finance an impartial, value-based and effective UN system.

By Barbara Adams. Barbara Adams is chair of the board of the Global Policy Forum, was trained as an economist in the UK and served as Executive Director of the Manitoba Council for International Affairs from 1977-1979 in Canada. She also served as Associate Director of the Quaker United Nations Office in New York (1981-1988), and as Deputy Coordinator of the UN Non-Governmental Liaison Service (NGLS) through the period of the UN global conferences and until 2003. From 2003-2008 she worked as Chief of Strategic Partnerships and Communications for the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM).

This op-ed is a short chapter in the 2030 Spotlight Report to be launched on 18 September 2020.

Source: South-North Development Monitor SUNS – SUNS #9190 Wednesday 16 September 2020.

Notes:

1 https://www.weforum.org/about/world-economic-forum

2 Ibid.

The post UN: Re-inventing multilateral solidarity – rhetoric, or realignment of power? appeared first on Global Policy Watch.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Nachhaltigkeit hat Tradition

Engagement Global Presse - 16. September 2020 - 14:57
Das 5. NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn findet digital statt. Foto: Kolja Matzke

Vernetzung, Fachwissen und Förderprogramme bietet Engagement Global, um den historischen Begriff der Nachhaltigkeit langfristig und weltweit wirken zu lassen. Unter dieser Prämisse findet auch das NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn digital statt. Am Freitag, 25. September 2020, kommen rund 150 Menschen virtuell zusammen, um Ideen weiterzutragen und Projekte zur Nachhaltigkeit voran zu bringen. Die Bandbreite der Themen reicht von der Förderung von Chancengleichheit über Bildung bis hin zu Klimaschutz.

Beim diesjährigen Barcamp wird Luca Samlidis, Pressesprecher von Fridays for Future Bonn, zu Gast sein. Er wird live vom Klimastreik in der Bonner Innenstadt dazu geschaltet, um das Barcamp zu eröffnen. Luca Samlidis‘ Rat für alle, die sich für Nachhaltigkeit engagieren wollen, lautet: „Tut es einfach und lasst euch nicht erzählen, dass ihr perfekt sein müsst, um etwas für den Klimaschutz zu tun und politisch etwas einzufordern. Und: Klimaschutz kann und sollte Spaß machen!“

Dass gemeinsames Engagement wirkt und die Welt in einigen Aspekten lebenswerter geworden ist, zeigt die Zwischenbilanz des Sustainable Development Goals Report 2020 der Vereinten Nationen. Am 25. September 2015 verabschiedeten alle Mitgliedsstaaten der Vereinten Nationen auf dem Gipfeltreffen in New York die Agenda 2030 und mit ihr die 17 Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (Sustainable Development Goals – SDG). Diesen Zielen hat sich auch Engagement Global verpflichtet und bietet mit dem NachhaltigkeitsCamp Bonn zum fünften Mal allen die Möglichkeit, ihnen näher zu kommen. Das Barcamp ist ein im Bonner Raum etabliertes Format, das jedes Jahr von rund 150 Menschen selbst gestaltet wird.

Interessierte Journalistinnen und Journalisten sind herzlich eingeladen, digital an der Veranstaltung teilzunehmen oder nach vorheriger Rücksprache persönlich im Studio in Siegburg vorbei zu kommen, um hinter die Kulissen einer virtuellen Veranstaltung zu blicken. An beiden Orten stehen Ansprechpersonen zur Verfügung.

Pressekontakt

Petra Gohr-Guder
Telefon: +49 (0) 228 20717 120
presse@engagement-global.de

Kategorien: Ticker

Seiten

SID Hamburg Aggregator – Ticker abonnieren