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New issue of ‘akzente’ focuses on women: Gender. Power. Politics.

GIZ Germany - 5. April 2019 - 18:55
: Mon, 03 Dec 2018 HH:mm:ss
Women: Gender. Power. Politics – the new issue of the GIZ magazine akzente provides opinions, facts and background information.
Kategorien: english

India is using soil protection practices to fight climate change

GIZ Germany - 5. April 2019 - 18:55
: Thu, 29 Nov 2018 HH:mm:ss
Well-protected soils are producing high yields in India and rich harvests are providing more food for families. Land productivity is being sustainably improved and is safeguarding the livelihoods of the 80,000 smallholders involved.
Kategorien: english

The Trump Administration Banned the ICC Prosecutor from Visiting the United States. Are UN Officials Next?

UN Dispatch - 5. April 2019 - 18:49

The prosecutor of the International Criminal Court is banned from the United States. Aside from official meetings at the United Nations, the State Department has placed visa restrictions on Fatou Bensouda, a Gambian woman who leads prosecutions of war criminals in the Hague-based court.

The visa-restrictions are ostensibly over a potential ICC investigation into war crimes in Afghanistan — an investigation, it should be noted, that has not actually be launched, and may not even happen.  But what is most significant about this move is that it reveals the extent to which the Trump administration is willing to punish and deter an international official from doing her job.  And this should be deeply concerning to officials at the UN in general, and to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights in particular.

This move against the ICC needs to be understood in the context of John Bolton’s longstanding hostility to the Court

The ICC came into being in 2002. This was the same time that John Bolton — and ardent critic of the court — became an Undersecretary of State in the George W. Bush administration.  When George W. Bush came to office, the administration took a highly unusual step of “un-signing” the treaty that created the ICC. At the time, John Bolton called that the “happiest moment” in his life as a public servant.

But withdrawing from the ICC treaty was not the end of US involvement. Rather, Bolton lead an effort in the Bush administration to limit the court’s jurisdiction. He did this by strong-arming US allies to into signing a bi-lateral immunity agreement to theoretically prevent Americans from coming under the court’s jurisdiction. If those US allies refused to sign the agreement, certain forms of military aid would be cut off.

At the time, I reported that this drive lead to some unusual outcomes that seemed to distort US foreign policy priorities. For example, the country of Latvia had some aid suspended in 2003 while it simultaneously deployed troops to Iraq as part of the Bush administration’s “Coalition of the Willing.”

When Bolton left the Bush administration in 2006, US policy toward the court became less adversarial, a modus-vivendi was reached. When Bolton rejoined government last year as National Security Advisor the Trump administration’s stance to the ICC went from indifference to outright hostility. Bolton’s his first major public speech as National Security Advisor was a long broadside against the ICC. It is fair to deduce that the decision to ban the ICC’s prosecutor from the United States is Bolton’s doing.

This move against the ICC should be a warning to the UN

The ICC is not part of the United Nations. But the decision by the US government to issue visa restrictions on the head of a multi-lateral organization should be deeply concerning to many around the United Nations. Specifically, it may foreshadow how the Trump administration could approach relations with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet.

An honor to share the podium today with @Malala. Together let’s stand up for gender equality. Women will truly be empowered when they can fully exercise their #humanrights and make their own decisions. @WAW_Japan @MalalaFund #StandUp4humanrights #Istandwithher pic.twitter.com/7xWlJK4cEA

— Michelle Bachelet (@mbachelet) March 23, 2019

In general, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights is ecumenical in criticizing human rights violations around the world. This sometimes includes chiding the United States. Most administrations have been able to balance the occasional criticisms aimed at the United States with the value of having an office at the UN that supports human rights and rule of law more broadly. The Trump administration, on the other hand, has been unwilling to accept any criticism.

Behind the scenes, it is seeking to de-legitimize key functions of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights by refusing to even communicate with officials from the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. More publicly, Bolton is seeking to de-fund the entire human rights office.

Michel Bachelet and her office are clearly being targeted by the Trump administration in a way that is not dissimilar to the International Criminal Court. It is not outside the realm of possibility that the Trump administration may seek to do to Bachelet what they have just done to Bensouda. Should that happen, a key element of the world’s human rights architecture would be severely weakened.

The post The Trump Administration Banned the ICC Prosecutor from Visiting the United States. Are UN Officials Next? appeared first on UN Dispatch.

Kategorien: english

Serving the bottom of the pyramid

D+C - 5. April 2019 - 14:56
In Kenya, two private-sector companies are making important difference in poor people’s lives

I have just come back from a short trip to Kenya. DEG, the KfW subsidiary that promotes private-sector activity in developing countries and emerging markets, had invited me and several other German journalists to visit some of the projects it is involved in. I plan to publish contributions by people I met there later this year, but I would like to share some impressions right away.

We visited two companies that are using digital technology to make a difference in poor people’s lives. They both have a monthly turnover that is equivalent to about $ 1 million to $ 1.2 million. They were both started a few years ago and have grown fast. Twiga is a B2B platform that links informal retailers to smallholder farmers, and Copia is an e-commerce firm that serves customers in remote villages. In this blog post, I’ll give you a rough idea of what they are doing.

African cities are growing fast. Urban planning is not keeping up. One consequence is that informal shops serve the vast majority of consumers. Twiga is making life easier for informal grocers. The company delivers bananas, potatoes, tomatoes and various other goods directly to the shops by truck. The trucks are operated by a team of two persons. They visit the shops daily. When they deliver the goods, the retailer can order what he wants to get the next day. Payments are made in cash or by mobile phone, which is possible thanks to Kenya’s by now world famous M-Pesa system.

The great advantages for the retailers are:

  • they do not have to provide the merchandise from wholesale markets,
  • that the perishable goods are fresh and thus still have a long shelf life when they arrive at the shop and
  • that Twiga grants them microcredits to optimise their business.

In Nairobi, Twiga is thus supporting informal businesses and improving the food supply of consumers in general. At the same time, the company has an important impact on rural development. It sources fruits and vegetables from smallholder farmers who benefit from long-term contracts. Twiga ensures that the supply chain is more efficient than it would be if farmers and retailers relied on the wholesale system.

According to a rule of thumb, 50 % of harvests are lost in developing countries because of inefficient supply chains and inadequate storage facilities. Twiga claims to have reduced that share to mere seven percent. The management expects to expand operations to Mombasa and later to Dar es Salaam in the not-too-distant future.

Copia’s business model is similar. The idea is to give disadvantaged village people consumer choices that go beyond what is on offer in small, informal stores. Typically, these people do not have internet access, nor can they rely on postal services.

Copia’s approach is to cooperate with agents. All orders can be made by simple mobile phones. The end customers place orders with the agents, and the goods are delivered to the agent’s shop. Typically, customers will live within 5 km of the shop. Instead of making long trips to the nearest town when they want to make major purchases, they can now have the goods delivered close to their homes. Copia sells a wide range of products from staple foods like rice to kitchenware, furniture, electronic goods, farm tools and even construction materials. The prices are comparatively low, and customers’ transaction costs (especially travel expenses and time) are reduced dramatically.

According to the management, Copia has now reached the size that allows it to start importing manufactured consumer goods directly from China. It expects that it will thus be able to further lower prices for end consumers, which in turn will enable Copia to expand sales and market share. Just like Twiga, Copia uses M-Pesa systematically and pays much attention to optimising the routes its delivery trucks take. To some extent, Copia cooperates with micro-finance institutions like local savings cooperatives.

Copia’s network of agents now covers several counties around Nairobi. The company plans to expand further into western Kenya and on to Uganda.

 

Links

Copia
https://copia.co.ke/

Twiga
https://twiga.ke/

Kategorien: english

Improving cost-effectiveness of social protection through better coordination and implementation

INCLUDE Platform - 5. April 2019 - 12:38

Seven international research groups have been selected by NWO-WOTRO Science for Global Development and INCLUDE to carry out research on social protection. Findings have been published in 2018, and are discussed in a policy publication. This poster outlines the conclusions that can be drawn if two main questions of the research are combined: i) what social protection programmes are most cost-effective; and 2) how can the coordination and implementation of social protection programmes be improved.

This poster (A1 size) was presented at the Transfer Project workshop that was held in Arusha, Tanzania, from 2-4 April 2019.

The post Improving cost-effectiveness of social protection through better coordination and implementation appeared first on INCLUDE Platform.

Kategorien: english

In Love-Hate with the United Nations?

Global Policy Forum - 5. April 2019 - 11:18

On the one hand, the United States is “Number One” as contributor to the UN regular budget as well as to the budgets of the UN peacekeeping operations. On the other hand, the United States is also the largest debtor caused by either partially or fully deferred payments. This leads to a vicious circle: Large amounts of unpaid assessed contributions cause tremendous administrative difficulties for the programme budgeting activities of the UN. Also, many UN Specialized Agencies suffer under the US financial behaviour. The United States is in favour of shifting from assessed to voluntary contributions. Since most of them are restricted to specific projects or countries, this would imply that the US as the most important donor of voluntary contributions would also become the dominant decision-maker in the UN. The author analyses the funding behaviour of the United States over the last decades and shows that financial leverages are an inherent policy tool of the US vis-à-vis the UN.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Draft Agenda of C20 Summit is out now

#C20 18 - 5. April 2019 - 10:00

The draft agenda of C20 Summit 2019 is out now.

*All the items are subject to change.

C20 Summit Draft Agenda (as of 5 April 2019)
Kategorien: english, Ticker

Promoting gender equality and women's empowerment in shock-sensitive social protection

ODI - 5. April 2019 - 0:00
Exploring how best to integrate gender equality into the design and implementation of shock-sensitive social protection programming.
Kategorien: english

Fight against climate change and poverty will fail without overhaul of global financial system, says major UN report

UN #SDG News - 4. April 2019 - 20:36
A major new UN-led report, involving more than 60 international organizations, warns that a comprehensive overhaul of the world’s financial system is necessary, if governments are to honour commitments to tackle critical issues, such as combatting climate change and eradicating poverty by 2030.
Kategorien: english

Fight against climate change and poverty will fail without overhaul of global financial system, says major UN report

UN ECOSOC - 4. April 2019 - 20:36
A major new UN-led report, involving more than 60 international organizations, warns that a comprehensive overhaul of the world’s financial system is necessary, if governments are to honour commitments to tackle critical issues, such as combatting climate change and eradicating poverty by 2030.
Kategorien: english

UN report calls for overhaul of global financial system #Fin4Dev

weitzenegger.de - 4. April 2019 - 20:14

The 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report of the Inter-agency Task Force on Financing for Development warns that unless national and international financial systems are revamped, the world’s governments will fail to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

To access the full report, policy recommendations and comprehensive and data-rich monitoring of progress, visit:  http://developmentfinance.un.org/fsdr2019

Sixty-plus international organizations, led by the United Nations and including the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank Group and World Trade Organization, jointly sounded the alarm Thursday in a new report, warning that unless national and international financial systems are revamped, the world’s governments will fail to keep their promises on such critical issues as combatting climate change and eradicating poverty by 2030.

In their 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report, the international organizations find some good news: investment has gained strength in some countries and interest in sustainable investing is growing, with 75 per cent of individual investors showing interest in how their investments affect the world.

And yet, greenhouse gas emissions grew 1.3 per cent in 2017; investment in many countries is falling; and 30 developing countries are now at high risk or already in debt distress. At the same time, global growth is expected to have peaked at around 3 per cent.

Changing the current trajectory in financing sustainable development is not just about raising additional investment, says the report. Achieving global goals depends on supportive financial systems, and conducive global and national policy environments.

Yet the report warns that creating favorable conditions is becoming more challenging. Rapid changes in technology, geopolitics, and climate are remaking our economies and societies, and existing national and multilateral institutions — which had helped lift billions out of poverty — are now struggling to adapt. Confidence in the multilateral system has been undermined, in part because it has failed to deliver returns equitably, with most people in the world living in countries with increasing inequality.

“Trust in the multilateral system itself is eroding, in part because we are not delivering inclusive and sustainable growth for all,” said António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, in his foreword to the report. “Our shared challenge is to make the international trading and financial systems fit for purpose to advance sustainable development and promote fair globalization.”

The international agencies recommend concrete steps to overhaul the global institutional architecture and make the global economy and global finance more sustainable, including:

  • supporting a shift towards long-term investment horizons with sustainability risks central to investment decisions;
  • revisiting mechanisms for sovereign debt restructuring to respond to more complex debt instruments and a more diverse creditor landscape;
  • revamping the multilateral trading system;
  • addressing challenges to tax systems that inhibit countries from mobilizing adequate resources in an increasingly digitalized world economy; and
  • addressing growing market concentration that extends across borders, with impacts on inequality.

At the national level, the report puts forward a roadmap for countries to revamp their public and private financial systems to mobilize resources for sustainable investment. It introduces tools for countries to align financing policies with national sustainable development strategies and priorities.

One example of the opportunities and challenges the report discusses is in new technologies and fintech (digitally enabled innovation in the financial sector).  With more than half a billion people gaining access to financial services in recent years, the appeal of fintech is clear.  But as new players enter and rapidly change the financing marketplace, regulators struggle to keep pace. As fintech grows in importance, activities outside the regulatory framework, if left unsupervised, may put financial stability at risk.

Fintech’s promise can pay off with regulatory approaches that address these concerns, but these need to be implemented without stifling innovation. To this end, the report emphasizes the importance of discussions between fintech companies, financial institutions and regulators. It finds that regulatory attention will need to shift to financial activities and their underlying risks, no matter the entity that engages in them, rather than by institutional type.

“We have a major opportunity to overcome bottlenecks in sustainable financing in 2019”, said Mr. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs and Chair of the Task Force that issued the report. “The responsibility rests with governments to recommit to multilateralism, and to take policy actions that will create a sustainable and prosperous future.”

Sixty-plus international organizations, led by the United Nations and including the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank Group and World Trade Organization, jointly sounded the alarm Thursday in a new report, warning that unless national and international financial systems are revamped, the world’s governments will fail to keep their promises on such critical issues as combatting climate change and eradicating poverty by 2030.

In their 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report, the international organizations find some good news: investment has gained strength in some countries and interest in sustainable investing is growing, with 75 per cent of individual investors showing interest in how their investments affect the world.

And yet, greenhouse gas emissions grew 1.3 per cent in 2017; investment in many countries is falling; and 30 developing countries are now at high risk or already in debt distress. At the same time, global growth is expected to have peaked at around 3 per cent.

Changing the current trajectory in financing sustainable development is not just about raising additional investment, says the report. Achieving global goals depends on supportive financial systems, and conducive global and national policy environments.

Yet the report warns that creating favorable conditions is becoming more challenging. Rapid changes in technology, geopolitics, and climate are remaking our economies and societies, and existing national and multilateral institutions — which had helped lift billions out of poverty — are now struggling to adapt. Confidence in the multilateral system has been undermined, in part because it has failed to deliver returns equitably, with most people in the world living in countries with increasing inequality.

“Trust in the multilateral system itself is eroding, in part because we are not delivering inclusive and sustainable growth for all,” said António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, in his foreword to the report. “Our shared challenge is to make the international trading and financial systems fit for purpose to advance sustainable development and promote fair globalization.”

The international agencies recommend concrete steps to overhaul the global institutional architecture and make the global economy and global finance more sustainable, including:

  • supporting a shift towards long-term investment horizons with sustainability risks central to investment decisions;
  • revisiting mechanisms for sovereign debt restructuring to respond to more complex debt instruments and a more diverse creditor landscape;
  • revamping the multilateral trading system;
  • addressing challenges to tax systems that inhibit countries from mobilizing adequate resources in an increasingly digitalized world economy; and
  • addressing growing market concentration that extends across borders, with impacts on inequality.

At the national level, the report puts forward a roadmap for countries to revamp their public and private financial systems to mobilize resources for sustainable investment. It introduces tools for countries to align financing policies with national sustainable development strategies and priorities.

One example of the opportunities and challenges the report discusses is in new technologies and fintech (digitally enabled innovation in the financial sector).  With more than half a billion people gaining access to financial services in recent years, the appeal of fintech is clear.  But as new players enter and rapidly change the financing marketplace, regulators struggle to keep pace. As fintech grows in importance, activities outside the regulatory framework, if left unsupervised, may put financial stability at risk.

Fintech’s promise can pay off with regulatory approaches that address these concerns, but these need to be implemented without stifling innovation. To this end, the report emphasizes the importance of discussions between fintech companies, financial institutions and regulators. It finds that regulatory attention will need to shift to financial activities and their underlying risks, no matter the entity that engages in them, rather than by institutional type.

“We have a major opportunity to overcome bottlenecks in sustainable financing in 2019”, said Mr. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs and Chair of the Task Force that issued the report. “The responsibility rests with governments to recommit to multilateralism, and to take policy actions that will create a sustainable and prosperous future.”

In the 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report, the Task Force finds some good news: investment has gained strength in some countries and interest in sustainable investing is growing, with 75 per cent of individual investors showing interest in how their investments affect the world. And yet, greenhouse gas emissions grew 1.3 per cent in 2017; investment in many countries is falling; and 30 developing countries are now at high risk or already in debt distress. At the same time, global growth is expected to have peaked at around 3 per cent.

Changing the current trajectory in financing sustainable development is not just about raising additional investment, says the report. Achieving global goals depends on supportive financial systems, and conducive global and national policy environments. The Task Force recommends concrete steps to revamp the global institutional architecture and make the global economy and global finance more sustainable, and also introduces integrated national financing frameworks as a tool for countries to align financing policies with national strategies and priorities.

The 2019 FSDR is the fourth report on implementing the Financing for Development outcomes and the means of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The assessment draws on the expertise, analysis and data from more than 60 agencies and international institutions that make up the Task Force, which is led by UN DESA and includes the World Bank Group, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organisation, as well as UN agencies such as UNCTAD and UNDP.

We hope you will make use of the full depth of data and analysis contained in the online annex at: http://developmentfinance.un.org.

Kategorien: english

Open Position: SDG Summer Analyst Intern

UN SDSN - 4. April 2019 - 19:51
ABOUT SDSN USA

The SDSN USA endeavors to build pathways for achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the United States by mobilizing research, outreach, and collective action. This includes: facilitating the development of solutions to U.S. sustainability challenges; building sophisticated, practical systems for measuring progress and connecting with stakeholders who will utilize them; facilitating public awareness, education, and engagement; and linking these efforts with policymakers and community leaders throughout the U.S. to result in lasting change.

PROJECT BACKGROUND

SDSN USA produces two sub-national reports, the City SDG Index, looking at the 100 largest MSAs in the US, and the State SDG Index (https://www.sdgusa.org/uploads/SDGreport2018.pdf), comparing all 50 states on the SDGs. SDSN USA is seeking a student to provide staff support to the State SDG indices as an “Analyst Intern.” SDSN USA will be updating and expanding the indices to include longitudinal data, as well as updating and revising the data and preparing two new reports for publication in September. The indices are part of an effort to raise awareness of the SDGs at the sub-national level in the US, and to highlight areas of excellence and of improvement across states.  

PRINCIPAL RESPONSIBILITIES

The Analyst Intern will be expected to work 40 hours/week, and will be responsible for:

  •      Supporting preparation of the data for the index, which will require desk-based research, developing and maintaining metadata, researching and collecting data
  •      Identifying experts in relevant fields for advice and review
  •      Development and research of relevant indicators and/or datasets
  •      Cleaning and preparing the data
  •      Reading and summarizing relevant academic research to support literature review
  •      Keeping the team informed about relevant data definitions and their implications for inclusion, exclusion, or comparison with other indices
  •      Drafting, editing and/or reviewing written material related to the index
  •      Managing and troubleshooting any issues related to the collection or distribution of databases
  •      Presenting findings and participating in research review during research meetings
  •      Other research activities as needed
QUALIFICATIONS
  • The position is open to both undergraduate and graduate students with the requisite skills
  • Comfort with excel, including downloading excel files, reading and basic arranging of quantitative data within excel, required
  • Familiarity with quantitative datasets
  • Highly organized and responsive
  • Proactive communication skills
  • Interest in data, quantitative research and data disaggregation
  • Familiarity with the SDGs, sustainability, the Leave No One Behind Agenda, and other relevant disciplines preferred
  • Experience with Stata, R, GIS, GitHub or other programming languages or statistical programs preferred but not required
  • Unfortunately, SDSN is not able to provide work visas for this internship
CONTRACT TERMS

Duration: June – August, 2019 with possibility for continuation

Compensation: $15-18/hour, depending on experience (40 hours/week)

Location: SDSN USA offices near Columbia University in New York City

HOW TO APPLY

To apply, please submit a CV and cover letter with the subject: “Summer Analyst Internship” to usa@unsdsn.org, before April 28th. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis.

Kategorien: english

Open Position: SDSN USA Summer Intern

UN SDSN - 4. April 2019 - 19:48
ABOUT SDSN

The UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) has been operating since 2012 under the auspices of the UN Secretary-General. SDSN mobilizes global scientific and technological expertise to promote practical solutions for sustainable development, including the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the Paris Climate Agreement.

SDSN USA launched in December 2018 as a national SDSN network and currently has over 110 member institutions from 41 states, Washington DC, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. In summer 2019, SDSN USA will be undertaking a membership drive and launching network-wide initiatives.

PRINCIPAL RESPONSIBILITIES

The SDSN USA Intern will be expected to work up to 40 hours/week from May/June through August. The intern will be responsible for a variety of tasks to support SDSN USA programs and membership activities, and may include:

  • Identifying potential network members and partners;
  • Drafting and reviewing communications materials;
  • Conducting desk-based research to support SDSN projects, for example on decarbonization localization activities or university-led SDG activities;
  • Supporting event planning and coordination for a fall members meeting and other events;
  • Mapping US university networks and activities.

Ideally, some activities will be co-developed with the selected candidate that aligns with both the intern’s interests and SDSN USA priorities. This position will report to Caroline Fox, Head of of SDSN USA.

QUALIFICATIONS

The position is open to graduate students who have completed at least one semester of coursework or undergraduates who have completed at least two years of study, ideally related to sustainable development and/or policy.

  • Familiarity with the United States political environment and sustainability concepts;
  • Knowledge of and interest in one or more of the following topics: decarbonization, climate change, campus organizing, online learning, U.S. public policy;
  • Ability to research broad topics and distill into approachable content;
  • Highly organized and responsive;
  • Strong English writing and communication skills;
  • Familiarity with the Sustainable Development Goals and sustainability rating systems a plus.
CONTRACT TERMS

Duration (dates and total time): June – August 2019, with possibility to extend
Compensation: $15-18/hour depending on experience, up to 40 hours/week

HOW TO APPLY

To apply, please submit a CV and cover letter with the subject: “Summer Program Internship” to usa@unsdsn.org, before April 28th. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis.

Kategorien: english

Financing for Sustainable Development Report 2019

UNSDN - 4. April 2019 - 19:05

Full text (pdf)

Major new UN report calls for overhaul of global financial system (pdf) (Français Español)

The 2019 Financing for Sustainable Development Report (FSDR) of the Inter-agency Task Force on Financing for Development warns that mobilizing sufficient financing remains a major challenge in implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Despite signs of progress, investments that are critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) remain underfunded and parts of the multilateral system are under strain.

The FSDR recommends that the international community should use this opportunity to reshape both national and international financial systems in line with sustainable development. If we fail to do so, we will fail to deliver the 2030 Agenda.

The 2019 FSDR begins with the global macroeconomic context (chapter I). The thematic chapter (chapter II) presents four building blocks to operationalize implementation of the Addis Agenda at the country level though integrated national financing frameworks (INFFs). The remainder of the report (Chapters III.A to III.G and IV) discusses progress in the seven action areas of the Addis Agenda. Each chapter begins with a summary that highlights key messages and presents policy options. Each chapter gives updates on implementation, and lays out challenges and policy options on both the national and international levels.

The 2019 FSDR is the fourth report on implementing the Financing for Development outcomes and the means of implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda. The assessment draws on the expertise, analysis and data from more than 60 agencies and international institutions that make up the Task Force, which is led by UN DESA and includes the World Bank Group, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organisation, as well as UN agencies such as UNCTAD and UNDP.

Source: UN DESA Financing

The post Financing for Sustainable Development Report 2019 appeared first on UNSDN - United Nations Social Development Network.

Kategorien: english

Experts, Leaders Agree on Key Ways to Mobilize Accelerated Action for Climate, Sustainable Development

UNSDN - 4. April 2019 - 16:47
3 April 2019, New York With the urgency of climate action at an all-time high, global experts and leaders meeting in Copenhagen identified key immediate action areas to better serve both the world’s efforts to achieve the goals of the Paris Climate Change Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to ensure better lives for all people.

Nearly 400 participants from around the world came together for the first Climate and SDGs Synergy Conference—formally the “Global Conference on Strengthening Synergies between the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”—and agreed that a stronger connection between the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides the world’s best opportunity for positive, systemic change that will ensure a sustainable and inclusive development in a healthy environment for present and future generations.

“Policies, programmes and partnerships must be designed to work together, to achieve synergies and reduce or eliminate the trade-offs,” said Liu Zhenmin, UN Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs. “There are many places where such convergence is possible—for example, energy transitions are at the heart of lowering greenhouse gas emissions. These also hold the potential for eradicating poverty, creating jobs, improving health and contributing to more sustainable ecosystems.”

Speaking on behalf of the UN Climate Change secretariat, Deputy Executive Secretary, Ovais Sarmad, said: “Climate change is a threat multiplier. If we don’t act urgently and with more ambition, it will destabilize the global economy, create conflict, displacement and cause incredible suffering for people everywhere. But climate change also provides our single greatest opportunity to build a safer, healthier, more resilient and prosperous world and by further linking the climate and SDGs process, we can drive transformative action at all levels.”

Participants from developed and developing nations, including government representatives, youth, and members of the private sector, academia, civil society and the UN system, attended the conference, organized by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA), the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Ministry of Energy, Utilities and Climate.

Attendees provided inputs to the outcome document, which will inform the in-depth review of SDG 13 on climate action at the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) in New York in July. They highlighted the opportunities, advantages and gains being made through cooperative implementation of climate action and the SDGs, including through better integration of Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) into the Paris Agreement, processes to formulate and implement national climate adaptation plans (NAPs), and the voluntary national reviews (VNRs) at HLPF. Other post-2015 development frameworks, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction and Addis Ababa Action Agenda on Financing for Development, will provide other opportunities for synergies.

Additionally, UN DESA and UNFCCC agreed to establish a global knowledge network and platform on the synergies between climate and SDGs, building on all the inputs to the conference, to be launched before the HLPF. Under-Secretary-General Liu said that UN DESA would work to identify and promote multi-stakeholder partnerships and commitments that can directly contribute to the Climate Action Summit and the SDG Summit in September, and it would establish a SDG-Climate Synergy Pavilion at the UNFCCC Conference of Parties (COP25) in Chile in December.

Participants discussed several new multi-stakeholder partnerships aiming to protect forests and the ocean, and boost efforts supporting sustainable energy.

For example, more than 20 leaders committed to the Cool Coalition, a new effort to accelerate action on the transition to clean and efficient cooling, which can help mitigate climate change, further sustainable development and save money. Led by UN Environment, the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, the Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program, and Sustainable Energy for All, the coalition includes the Ministers of Environment from Chile and Rwanda, the heads of the Danish engineering firm Danfoss and the French global energy utility Engie, as well as other leaders from civil society, academia and intergovernmental institutions.

Furthermore, young people at the Copenhagen conference made it clear that they stand ready to cooperate on efforts to achieve the SDGs and Paris Agreement—and in fact, are leading their own. Citing the 15 March School Strike for Climate as proof of the rising youth movement, Annisa Triyanti of Indonesia, representing the UN Major Group for Children and Youth (MGCY), said she and her peers worry that they are studying for a future that might not be there.

“Through hard and genuine work, we can be the voice of the voiceless,” she said at the conference opening session. “We have done our homework. Now it is your turn and we’re ready to work together.”

Kristian Jensen, the Minister of Finance of Denmark, said he stands ready to meet young people’s high expectations—and encouraged other finance ministers to join these efforts.

“The message from youth around the world on climate and SDG action is loud and clear: Get moving or get out the way,” Jensen said. “That is why we need all hands on deck—including ministers for finance. Because we need to put action behind the promises we made. If we do this, I am convinced we can deliver on the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda.”

Background:

Climate change is the defining issue of our time, and while the world needs to move fast, the solutions must be fair. The world’s most vulnerable people are suffering the worst effects of climate change, such as more intense storms, dangerous heat waves, more frequent and longer-lasting droughts, rising seas, while contributing least to the problem. The interconnected Sustainable Development Goals, which include the standalone SDG 13 on Climate Action, provide the best framework for tackling the climate emergency in ways that help everyone, in particular, women, children, youth, older persons, persons with disabilities and those living in small island developing states.

The Climate and SDGs Synergy Conference is a critical part of the UN’s comprehensive review of climate action in 2019. The conference will serve also as a preparatory Expert Group Meeting for SDG 13, which is one of the goals to be examined in-depth at this year’s High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), happening at UN Headquarters in New York in July. This thematic review in Copenhagen of SDG 13 implementation will provide valuable context for the HLPF’s deliberations. The HLPF outcome itself will inform the debate at two other major UN events, the Secretary-General’s Climate Action Summit and the SDG Summit, to be held on consecutive days during the General Assembly high-level week in September.

The IPCC special report on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 degrees Celsius outlines the interactions of climate change and climate responses with sustainable development, including sustainable development impacts at 1.5 °C and 2 °C, the synergies and trade-offs of mitigation and adaptation with the Sustainable Development Goals, and the possibilities for sustainable and equitable low-carbon, climate resilient development pathways.

Source: UN DESA

The post Experts, Leaders Agree on Key Ways to Mobilize Accelerated Action for Climate, Sustainable Development appeared first on UNSDN - United Nations Social Development Network.

Kategorien: english

Narbaeva: Uzbekistan is determined to reform and put an end to negative stereotypes

EURACTIV.com - 4. April 2019 - 8:53
Tanzila Narbaeva, the Deputy Prime Minister of Uzbekistan, told EURACTIV about her country's efforts to develop modern agriculture, eliminate child or forced labour and invest in human capital, especially women.
Kategorien: english

4th Circular Change Conference on 16 – 17 May in Maribor, Slovenia

SCP-Centre - 4. April 2019 - 8:23

The Circular Change Conference, taking place in Maribor, Slovenia, 16-17 May 2019, is one of the most prominent annual gatherings of the circular economy community, sustainable businesses and government actors in Europe.

The ambition of the 4th Circular Change Conference is to move towards “less talk, more action”. We are inviting you to explore what is actually happening “on the ground”. We all know that switching from a linear to a circular economy is a must. We have excellent reports and scientific data, and we have agreed to follow the sustainable development approach. What we need now is concrete action, radical collaboration and scalable success stories.

This year we are focusing on real business cases from the four priority sectors set out in the Roadmap Towards the Circular Economy in Slovenia – food system, manufacturing industries, mobility and forest-based value chains, while highlighting the key role of creative industries. Held under Honorary Sponsorship of the Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia Marjan Šarec and supported by renowned mentors from all over the world, the Circular Change team will be joined by around 400 participants from over 20 countries who will help us co-create sustainable solutions for the future.

Why is the Circular Change Conference a Must-be-there Event?

  • Over 30 speakers from over 15 countries
  • Presentations by companies, such as Aquafil, Laško Union Brewery, Skaza and many others
  • Introduces new topics into discussion on the national, EU and international levels
  • Listed by the World Economic Forum as one of the key circular community engagement events of the year
  • Part of EU Green Week
  • Held in a unique location in the centre of Slovenia’s 2nd largest city
  • Unique positive atmosphere: Slovenian hospitality for an annual meeting of friends and newcomers
  • Features an inspiring mix of activities: keynotes, workshops, roundtables, exhibitions, networking and company visits

The CSCP supports the 4th Circular Change Conference as a communication partner!

Name: 4th Circular Change Conference
Date: 16 – 17 May 2019
Location: Maribor, Slovenia
Registration: https://circularchange-conference.com/tickets/

Der Beitrag 4th Circular Change Conference on 16 – 17 May in Maribor, Slovenia erschien zuerst auf CSCP gGmbH.

Kategorien: english, Ticker

Are we all developing countries now?

EADI Debating Development Research - 4. April 2019 - 8:11
By Rory Horner Development is not something which the global North has achieved, and which only the global South still needs to work on. It requires changes and commitments in all countries. The Sustainable Development Goals have given mainstream prominence to this argument. The intensifying impacts of climate change, overwhelmingly caused by high income populations, …
Kategorien: english, Ticker

How a Social Entrepreneur is Fighting Counterfeit Medicines in the Developing World

UN Dispatch - 4. April 2019 - 4:06

Not long ago, the social entrepreneur Bright Simons tried and failed to create a platform to pair organic farmers in Ghana with consumers of organic products. But in that failure he made an important discovery that is now revolutionizing the fight against fake and counterfeit goods in the developing world — including potentially deadly counterfeit medicines.

Bright Simons is the co-founder and lead of mPedigree, a social enterprise that combats the problem of counterfeit and fake goods — everything from medicines, to seeds, to auto-parts and more.

As Bright Simons explains, mPedigree takes a systems-wide approach to fighting counterfeits. Its core innovation is a unique product identification marker, called the GoldKeys Platform. Think of it as a scratch off label that reveals a code which people can use a phone to instantly validate the authenticity of a product.

Through this validation system, mPedigree has not only helped stop counterfeiting across many industries, but as Bright Simons explains it’s changing the behavior of individual consumers, industries and even government.

This conversation with Bright Simons will change how you think about counterfeit goods and the systems required to stop this problem and restore consumer confidence and trust.

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This episode is presented in partnership with the Skoll Foundation to showcase the work of the 2019 recipients of the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship. The Skoll Awards distinguish transformative leaders whose organizations disrupt the status quo, drive sustainable large-scale change, and are poised to create even greater impact on the world. Recipients receive $1.5 million in core support investments to scale up their work.

The post How a Social Entrepreneur is Fighting Counterfeit Medicines in the Developing World appeared first on UN Dispatch.

Kategorien: english

'Score a goal’ for humanity, says Mohammed, celebrating winning link between sport and development

UN #SDG News - 4. April 2019 - 0:03
Celebrating the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed told an event in New York on Wednesday - headquarters of team UN - that “sport helps find common ground” during times of division.
Kategorien: english

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