Sie sind hier

SID Mitglieder Update

Nachruf Paul Groß

DIE Blog - 26. August 2019 - 15:29

Paul Groß

Das DIE trauert um seinen geschätzten Kollegen Paul Groß, der viel zu früh von uns gegangen ist. Sein Tod kam plötzlich und unerwartet. Mit ihm verlieren wir einen langjährigen, humorvollen und allseits beliebten Mitarbeiter und Kollegen. In Gedanken sind wir bei seiner Familie.

Der Beitrag Nachruf Paul Groß erschien zuerst auf International Development Blog.

MGG Conference in Mexico: The Power of Cooperation: Shaping a positive narrative of global governance

DIE Blog - 26. August 2019 - 14:55

Conference Participants

On 25-26 July, the Managing Global Governance (MGG) network organised together with the Mexican Agency for International Cooperation and Development (AMEXCID) and the research organisation Instituto Mora the conference „The Power of Cooperation: Shaping a positive narrative of global governance“. It took place at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Mexico City.

Alumni of all years of the MGG Academy, – the training and dialogue format of the MGG network – partners from the MGG network, and guests from politics, academia, civil society, and the private sector discussed how to hold open spaces for dialogue in times of increasing polarisation and nationalist tendencies. The discussions focused on the direct exchange between all stakeholders, the agreement on problem and possible solutions and the work in multi-sectoral networks in the fields of migration and international development cooperation.

The conference was part of a series of events in all MGG partner countries (Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa) to examine positive narratives of global governance. The conference in Mexico built on the discussions in India (28 – 29 April 2019) and its results will feed into the follow-up event in Brazil (18 – 20 September 2019).

The great interest in the discussion is documented by related media coverage.

Der Beitrag MGG Conference in Mexico: The Power of Cooperation: Shaping a positive narrative of global governance erschien zuerst auf International Development Blog.

MGG Konferenz in Mexiko: The Power of Cooperation: Shaping a positive narrative of Global Governance

DIE Blog - 26. August 2019 - 12:53

Conference Participants

Zusammen mit der mexikanischen Agentur für Entwicklungszusammenarbeit AMEXCID (Agencia Mexicana de Cooperación International) und der Forschungseinrichtung Instituto Mora veranstaltete das Managing Global Governance (MGG) Netzwerk am 25. und 26. Juli 2019 die Konferenz „The power of Cooperation: Shaping a positive narrative of Global Governance“ im mexikanischen Außenministerium in Mexiko-Stadt.

Absolventinnen und Absolventen aus allen Jahrgängen der MGG Academy – dem Trainings- und Dialogformat des MGG-Netzwerks – diskutierten gemeinsam mit Partnern aus dem MGG-Netzwerk sowie Gästen aus Politik, Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft und Zivilgesellschaft, wie ein fairer Dialog in Zeiten zunehmender Polarisierung und nationalistischer Tendenzen geführt werden kann. Der direkte Austausch zwischen den beteiligten Akteuren, die Verständigung über Problem und Lösungsoptionen und die Arbeit in multisektoralen Netzwerken in den Themenbereichen Migration und internationale Entwicklungszusammenarbeit standen dabei im Vordergrund

Die Konferenz war Teil einer Serie von Veranstaltungen in allen MGG Partnerländern (Brasilien, China, Indien, Indonesien, Mexiko, Südafrika), die einem positiven Narrativ von Global Governance nachspüren. Die Konferenz in Mexiko griff die Diskussion aus der vorangegangenen Konferenz in Indien (28. – 29. April 2019) auf. Ihre Ergebnisse werden in die Folgeveranstaltung in Brasilien (18. – 20. September 2019) einfließen.

Das große Interesse an der Diskussion wird unter anderem durch die mediale Verarbeitung der Veranstaltung dokumentiert.

 

Der Beitrag MGG Konferenz in Mexiko: The Power of Cooperation: Shaping a positive narrative of Global Governance erschien zuerst auf International Development Blog.

Start of MGG Academy 2019

DIE Blog - 26. August 2019 - 12:04

MGG Academy 2019 Participants

On 19 August, the MGG Academy 2019 has kicked-off at the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE), bringing together 23 participants from Brazil, China, Germany, India, Indonesia, Mexico, and South Africa. The MGG Academy is a four-month dialogue and training course for young professionals from governmental institutions, research institutions, civil society and the private sector that aims at developing the competencies of future change makers to address global challenges. On 23 August, the participants hosted the Global Village for colleagues from DIE and other institutions in Bonn. They set up stalls that showcased facts and current issues in their countries. The informal event was also an opportunity to socialise and get to know the participants and their cultures through food, art, and various activities.

 

Der Beitrag Start of MGG Academy 2019 erschien zuerst auf International Development Blog.

Start der MGG Academy 2019

DIE Blog - 26. August 2019 - 12:02

MGG Academy 2019 Participants

Am 19. August startete die MGG Academy 2019 mit 23 Teilnehmenden aus Brasilien, China, Deutschland, Indien, Indonesien, Mexiko und Südafrika. Die MGG Academy ist ein viermonatiger Dialog- und Ausbildungskurs für Nachwuchsführungskräfte in Regierungseinrichtungen, Forschungsinstituten, der Zivilgesellschaft und dem Privatsektor. Sie zielt darauf ab, die Kompetenzen künftiger Transformationsakteure für die Bearbeitung globaler Herausforderungen zu stärken. Am 23. August luden die Teilnehmenden Kollegen aus dem DIE und aus anderen Institutionen in Bonn zu einem „Global Village“ ein, bei dem sie in Form von Ständen aktuelle Themen und Informationen aus ihren Heimatländern vorstellten. Die informelle Veranstaltung bot eine gute Gelegenheit sich gegenseitig kennenzulernen, u.a. auch über Kultur, Kunst, Essen und weitere Aktivitäten.

Der Beitrag Start der MGG Academy 2019 erschien zuerst auf International Development Blog.

Youth and Citizenship in Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean

GIGA Event - 23. August 2019 - 14:40
Veranstaltung im Rahmen des Lateinamerika- und Karibik-Herbstes 2019 Hamburg Seminar Adresse

GIGA
Neuer Jungfernstieg 21
20354 Hamburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte Politische Verantwortlichkeit und Partizipation Frieden und Sicherheit Regionen GIGA Institut für Lateinamerika-Studien Anmeldung erforderlich

Youth and Citizen Participation in the European Union, Latin America and the Caribbean

GIGA Event - 22. August 2019 - 14:33
Eröffnungspanel im Rahmen des Lateinamerika- und Karibik-Herbstes 2019 Hamburg Veranstaltung Referent*innen Paola Amadei (EU-LAC Stiftung), Sabine Kurtenbach (GIGA), Anette Tabbara (Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg), Graeme Simpson (UN), Juan Carlos Vargas (Youth Latin America, Caribbean Network for Democracy), Benjamin Gunther (European Youth Forum), Shaquille Knowles (Caribbean Regional Youth Council) Adresse

Rathaus Hamburg (Kaisersaal)
Rathausmarkt 1
Hamburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte Politische Verantwortlichkeit und Partizipation Frieden und Sicherheit Regionen GIGA Institut für Lateinamerika-Studien Anmeldung erforderlich

The G7 Summit in Biarritz: Finding agreement amid discord

DIE Blog - 21. August 2019 - 14:10

It is a common practice today to speak about the demise of the liberal world order. Threats to multilateralism, free trade and democratic values seem to arise from everywhere; both through a growing assertiveness of authoritarian regimes, but also from within liberal democracies.

This creates particular challenges for international cooperation at a time when the world is increasingly confronted with new or (re-)emerging and transversal issues such as digital privacy and inequality. These issues are insufficiently regulated within our existing system of institutions, necessitating new and renewed forms of multilateral cooperation.

In light of these challenges, on the occasion of the 2018 G7 Summit in Charlevoix, Canada and the accompanying Think 7 Summit (a meeting of researchers from G7 countries extended to include a number of outreach partners), we looked at the particular institutional characteristics of the G7 and how they impact its ability to tackle new and transversal issues in global governance. In an article that was the output of our involvement in the Think 7 Summit, we highlighted two important features of the G7 that make it better suited than other international institutions to address these issues: the informality and like-mindedness of G7 members when it comes to social, economic and political values. We argued the G7’s relatively high level of informality, along with its focus on shared values among members make it well adapted to address new and complex issues that have „no home”. At the same time, its members are frequently expected to share problem definitions that enable them to reach faster solutions. Both at the previous Charlevoix and the upcoming Biarritz Summits, leaders of the G7 have committed to dealing with increasingly complex threats to multilateralism and emerging problems such as growing inequality, green finance, and the taxation of the digital economy.

However, as the G7 Summit in Biarritz approaches, it has become clear that the likemindedness of G7 member states is in flux and what we are presented with is a “G6 plus one.” Given the current global context, reaching solutions on these issues has proven to be difficult in light of, in particular, domestic developments in the United States. Yet, with creative solutions building on the G7’s informality and the flexibility it provides, the current era of the G6 plus one will not necessarily relegate the G7 to a phase of decline and inactivity. Ahead of the upcoming summit, we call on leaders to make the most of the G7 by intensifying their debate on a long-term coherent vision strengthening common values and, where this proves to be impossible, to create mini-lateral solutions and long-term plans for particular problems at hand.

Playing to the G7’s strengths

Over a history of forty-five summits from Rambouillet in 1975 to the upcoming summit in Biarritz, the G7 has had an overall mixed record of tackling global issues. Building on the competitive advantages offered by its informal nature and generally like-minded membership, the G7 has been relatively more successful at tackling new and complex issues than conventional issues.

In 2018, for example, G7 leaders addressed both well-established and emerging issues. Within the first category, they acknowledged that trade liberalization contributes to economic growth, urged North Korea to dismantle its weapons of mass destruction, and expressed concern for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Not surprisingly, these statements did not contribute to solving these entrenched issues.

The G7 was more productive in framing emerging issues, such as sexual violence in digital contexts, foreign interference in elections, the governance of artificial intelligence, and ocean plastic waste. These problems are not adequately governed by other international institutions and G7 declarations adopted in 2018 will contribute to framing these issues in the years to come.

Likewise, the Biarritz agenda includes traditional issues that are already on the work program of existing intergovernmental organizations, such as fighting terrorism, protecting biodiversity, maintaining a resilient financial system and promoting access to education, as well as emerging issues that are in need of global leadership, including digital trust and supply chains for agricultural commodities. We expect the Biarritz Summit to be of greater importance for the second category of issues.

Making the most of the “G6 plus one”

Over a history of forty-five summits from Rambouillet in 1975 to the upcoming summit in Biarritz, the G7 has had an overall mixed record of tackling global issues. Building on the competitive advantages offered by its informal nature and generally like-minded membership, the G7 has been relatively more successful at tackling new and complex issues than conventional issues.

In 2018, for example, G7 leaders addressed both well-established and emerging issues. Within the first category, they acknowledged that trade liberalization contributes to economic growth, urged North Korea to dismantle its weapons of mass destruction, and expressed concern for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Not surprisingly, these statements did not contribute to solving these entrenched issues.

The G7 was more productive in framing emerging issues, such as sexual violence in digital contexts, foreign interference in elections, the governance of artificial intelligence, and ocean plastic waste. These problems are not adequately governed by other international institutions and G7 declarations adopted in 2018 will contribute to framing these issues in the years to come.

Likewise, the Biarritz agenda includes traditional issues that are already on the work program of existing intergovernmental organizations, such as fighting terrorism, protecting biodiversity, maintaining a resilient financial system and promoting access to education, as well as emerging issues that are in need of global leadership, including digital trust and supply chains for agricultural commodities. We expect the Biarritz Summit to be of greater importance for the second category of issues.

The G7 remains an informal institution, despite its 45 years of meetings and efforts – both deliberate and organic – to institutionalize its processes. Yet, growing divergences in preferences, such as the United States’ “America First” foreign policy, puts the like-mindedness of G7 members at risk. At Biarritz next week, in areas ranging from international trade to climate change mitigation, G7 discussions seem likely to fragment, with dividing lines forming between the positions of the G6 (and the European Union) and that of the United States.

Reduced like-mindedness could harm the G7 in two ways. First, it may impede members’ ability to reach consensus on important issues. Second, as host states set the agenda, with the Trump Administration assuming the G7 Presidency at the end of the year, it could make transitions between summits increasingly erratic. Yet, building on the G7’s informality and the flexibility it conveys, solutions are available.

In areas where the G7 fails to reach consensus, there are no rules preventing smaller, “mini-lateral” groupings of like-minded member states from coordinating on pressing matters or the addition of external like-minded states to a summit. Like-minded sub-group or extended group mini-lateral solutions can serve as the basis for broader solutions at future summits. The sub-group strategy was successfully used in the early years of Russia’s G7 (then G8) participation where the G7—excluding Russia—met alongside the G8. The extended groups solution is being used again this year, with Australia, India, Egypt, South Africa, Rwanda and Chile set to attend the Summit.

G7 themes have historically been set by the host country, affecting the coherence of transitions from one summit to the next. With the United States in line to host the upcoming 2020 G7 Summit, there may be a clear agenda shift after Biarritz. To minimize disruption, at Biarritz, the G7 should prioritize a small number of long-term initiatives to be followed up at the next summit, as recommended by this year’s Think Tank 7 report. Doing so will ensure a degree of consistency is maintained from one summit to the next, while leaving host states room to incorporate their choice items on the agenda and respond to new pressing issues.

Conclusion

As would be expected of one of the progenitors of the G7, the French Presidency has been proactive in its organization of and boosterism surrounding this year’s summit. It has arranged the usual run-up of ministerial meetings and social media campaigns to build a steady drum roll of anticipation ahead of the leaders’ summit at the end of August. In addition, it has reached out not only to external partners as mentioned above but also domestic groups in an effort to placate the gilets jaunes. Moreover, for the first time in a decade, the summit will be organised across three days rather than two. We applaud this proactivity, especially if it reinforces the G7’s comparative advantages as an informal (and therefore flexible) as well as like-minded grouping. However, the French Presidency needs to proceed with caution.

We welcome the extended groups solution as one way to keep the G7 relevant. Utilizing a ‘variable geometry’ and rebooting each summit in terms of inviting like-minded leaders to discuss emerging issues can ensure that the right people to address a specific issue are sat at the same table. It should be embraced as the ‘new normal’ of the way future G7 summits are organized, rather than presented as a novelty. However, there are associated risks. Invited guests need to feel that they are part of a meaningful discussion with tangible outcomes and follow-through to ensure they do not become disillusioned, disengaged and look to form their own groups of outsiders defined by little more than their perceived exclusion by the traditional G7 elite. The way in which the G5 of Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa failed to articulate successfully with the G8 provides a cautionary lesson that should be heeded to ensure the reboot in design of the G7 at Biarritz does not become just one more attempt at rearranging chairs on the Titanic.

In terms of the summit agenda, the French Presidency has placed the emphasis on the nebulous and potentially meaningless soundbite of ‘fighting inequality’. This is all very well as an attempt to grab attention and elicit some buy-in but requires greater specificity around the issues to be addressed. As we have argued elsewhere, the G7 is well placed to address new and transversal issues, and we hope to see concrete progress at Biarritz particularly in terms of framing the issues of digital trust, supply chains for agricultural commodities, and given its theme, the underlying dimensions of inequality and its impact on other issue areas. The G7 should provide a home for these issues and resist the urge to fall back solely on traditional, headline issues that are often little more than soundbites.

This year’s G7 summit has the opportunity to provide a template for the way future summits are organized in a more nimble and agile way than has been the case at recent summits. This template is all the more necessary as the G7 Presidency rotates from a proactive France to a capricious Trump administration seeking re-election in 2020 and a UK in 2021 still seeking political stability and leadership as a result of the Brexit debacle. Mini-lateralism and long-term thinking provide two viable ways through these uncertain times.

Der Beitrag The G7 Summit in Biarritz: Finding agreement amid discord erschien zuerst auf International Development Blog.

Engagement in fragilen Staaten erfordert Konfliktsensibilität

VENRO - 21. August 2019 - 13:13

Nachhaltige Entwicklungszusammenarbeit und effektive humanitäre Hilfe sind in fragilen Staaten besonderes schwer zu realisieren. Bei der Finanzierung von Projekten muss daher die politische Situation vor Ort genau berücksichtigt werden. Oft fehlt es den Geberländern jedoch an der notwendigen Konfliktsensibilität.

In den letzten Jahren engagieren sich Geberländer zunehmend in fragilen Kontexten – die internationale Gemeinschaft hat ihre Unterstützung in solchen Ländern von 2007 bis 2016 real um mehr als 27 Prozent gesteigert. Dieser Entwicklung liegt die Erkenntnis zugrunde, dass staatliche Fragilität nicht allein die dort lebenden Menschen betrifft und ihre Lebensperspektiven negativ beeinflusst, sondern gleichzeitig regionale und weltweite Folgen hat.

Vor diesem Hintergrund ist ein noch immer häufig verwendeter politischer Frame die „Bekämpfung von Fluchtursachen“, also die Annahme, dass Investitionen in die Entwicklung fragiler Länder – teilweise hypothetische – Negativeffekte auf die eigenen Staaten mindern könnten. Nachbarländer fragiler Staaten und Geberregierungen versuchen im besten Fall mit solchen oder ähnlichen Begriffen auf populistische Bedrohungspropaganda in ihrer jeweiligen Öffentlichkeit zu reagieren – im schlechtesten Fall bedienen sie sie sogar. Teile von Gesellschaft und Politik dramatisieren die Belastungen für das eigene Land, die vermeintlich durch fragile Bedingungen anderswo entstehen. Das verleitet auf politischer Ebene schnell zu Aktionismus oder zur Abschottung. Beispiele sind die Finanzierung großvolumiger Projekte in Krisengebieten oder die Unterstützung von Grenzsicherungsmaßnahmen, die inhuman und mit Menschenrechten nicht vereinbar sind. Die von Expert_innen für fragile Kontexte geforderte Konfliktsensibilität und Kontextualisierung externer Interventionen finden kaum Berücksichtigung und bestehende zivilgesellschaftliche Initiativen sowie einflussreiche informelle Autoritäten oder Respektspersonen können sich nicht einbringen. Damit laufen solche Maßnahmen Gefahr, für die betroffenen Menschen keine positiven Wirkungen zu haben, oder schlimmstenfalls deren Lebenssituation sogar noch fragiler zu machen.

Wirkungsanalysen sind in fragilen Kontexten unerlässlich

Bis 2030, so eine Schätzung der Organisation für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (OECD), werden etwa vier Fünftel aller extrem armen Menschen in Ländern oder Regionen mit fragilen Voraussetzungen zu Hause sein. Deswegen müssen sich internationale Nichtregierungsorganisationen (NRO) vermehrt mit den schwierigen Rahmenbedingungen zivilgesellschaftlichen Engagements in fragilen Kontexten auseinandersetzen. Nachhaltige Entwicklungszusammenarbeit und effektive humanitäre Hilfe sind in fragilen Kontexten noch schwieriger zu realisieren als in solchen mit funktionierenden und belastbaren staatlichen Strukturen. Fehlende oder schwache Rechtsstaatlichkeit, hohe Gewalt- und Kriminalitätsraten, gering legitimierte staatliche Ansprechpartner sowie beschränkte Wirkungsräume zivilgesellschaftlicher Strukturen, Korruption und schwacher sozialer Zusammenhalt behindern und bedrohen besonders die Arbeit einheimischer zivilgesellschaftlicher Organisationen. Sie stellen aber auch für internationale NRO besondere Herausforderungen dar und bringen für alle spezielle Risiken mit sich. Deswegen sind in fragilen Kontexten genaue und wiederholte Analysen der nichtintendierten Wirkungen, der Beziehungsgeflechte und Entscheidungswege unerlässlich, um die Situation der Menschen tatsächlich zu verbessern. Die Erfahrung und die Kenntnisse der Menschen vor Ort sollten dafür die Basis bilden – seien es die von Kolleg_innen aus NRO oder von integren Respektpersonen auf staatlicher wie nicht-staatlicher Ebene oder einfach die von Menschen, die sich für das Gemeinwohl einsetzen.

Armut und Unsicherheit prägen den Lebensalltag der meisten Menschen in fragilen Kontexten. Schon jetzt müssen rund 1,8 Milliarden Menschen mit diesen Bedingungen umgehen und geeignete Überlebensstrategien entwickeln, bis 2030 werden es voraussichtlich etwa 2,3 Milliarden sein. In der Mehrheit sind das Menschen, die jünger sind als 20 Jahre und für die prekäre Lebensverhältnisse, extreme soziale Ungleichheit, Gewalt und Korruption ebenso zum Alltag gehören wie fehlende staatliche Dienstleistungen, schlechte Bildungs- und Erwerbsmöglichkeiten, erschwerte gesellschaftliche und politische Teilhabe sowie bedrohliche Schädigungen der Ökosysteme.

Misstrauen in Institutionen bestimmt das Verhältnis der Menschen zum Staat und seinen Vertretern. Besonders dort, wo gewalttätige Konflikte eine Rolle spielen, gefährden nicht allein fehlende soziale, wirtschaftliche und politische Sicherheit ein vertrauensvolles und friedliches Zusammenleben, sondern zusätzlich Gewalt sowie Gefahr für Leib und Leben. Mut machend ist aber, dass es selbst unter diesen Bedingungen und Verhältnissen Menschen, Initiativen, Organisationen und manchmal sogar Institutionen (oder Teile davon) gibt, die sich für alle einsetzen und denen daran gelegen ist, die Fragilität ihres jeweiligen Umfeldes zu verringern. Diese Kräfte zu identifizieren, ihre Ideen für Veränderung kennenzulernen und zu verstehen, sollte zu Beginn eines jeden externen Engagements in fragilen Kontexten stehen. Wenn es gelingt, die durch Erfahrungen mit fragilen Bedingungen entwickelte Kreativität der Menschen zu nutzen, den Austausch untereinander zu erleichtern und Projekte an sich verändernde Bedingungen immer wieder anzupassen, sind das weitere Schritte, die zu einem wirksamen zivilgesellschaftlichen Engagement in fragilen Kontexten beitragen können. Und letztlich gehört für alle Beteiligten der Mut zum Scheitern dazu!

Christine Idems ist Sprecherin der VENRO-AG Fragile Staaten.

Weitere Hintergründe zu diesem Thema erhalten Sie in unserem Positionspapier „Noch Normalfall oder schon Ausnahme: Die Zusammenarbeit mit fragilen Staaten“, in dem Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der Arbeit in Konfliktregionen dargestellt und Forderungen an die Bundesregierung und Bundestag gericht werden.

„Es gibt für systemische Konflikte keine einfachen Lösungen“

VENRO - 20. August 2019 - 16:41

Politische und soziale Konflikte und die Zahl betroffener Menschen nehmen weltweit wieder zu. Im Interview erläutert Prof. Hans-Joachim Gießmann  von der Berghof Foundation die gegenwärtigen Entwicklungen in der Friedensförderung und bewertet die zivilgesellschaftliche Relevanz für Transformations- und Friedensprozesse in fragilen Staaten.

Ist Ihre Arbeit in den vergangenen Jahren schwieriger geworden?

Ja, und zwar in zweifacher Hinsicht. Erstens: Der zunehmend systemische Charakter von Konflikten verlangt ein tieferes Verständnis für die inneren Dynamiken komplexer Ursachen und Wirkungen friedensfördernder ebenso wie friedenshemmender Faktoren. Es gibt für systemische Konflikte keine einfachen Lösungen. Weder für Gewaltkonflikte noch für den Klimawandel, nicht für ökonomische Rückständigkeit noch für die Veränderung der Arbeitswelt durch Digitalisierung – um nur Beispiele zu nennen. Die Dinge hängen zusammen, beeinflussen einander und die vermeintliche Lösung für ein Problem kann zu neuen Problemen in anderen Bereichen oder für andere Akteure führen.

Zweitens: Die Rahmenbedingungen für Konflikttransformation sind komplizierter geworden. Die Rückkehr von Geopolitik vermindert das erforderliche Augenmerk für die vielen „kleinen Kriege“ und für die alltägliche Gewalt in Staaten, in denen noch immer das Recht der Stärkeren Vorrang vor der Stärke des Rechts genießt. Die Rivalität der großen Mächte schlägt zum Beispiel auf die Handlungsfähigkeit der Vereinten Nationen, auf die Ausstattung von Friedensmissionen und die Beharrlichkeit diplomatischer Vermittlung durch. Dass die USA und Russland hier eine besondere Verantwortung tragen und ihr nicht gerecht werden, zeigt sich an der durch beide Staaten vorangetriebenen Zerstörung des weltweiten Regimes der Rüstungskontrolle und Abrüstung.

Wie wirkt sich der weltweit wachsende Druck auf die Zivilgesellschaft auf die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen und internationalen Organisationen aus?

Die Bilanz ist zwiespältig. Einerseits trifft zu, dass der Raum der aktiven Einflussnahme zivilgesellschaftlicher Akteure unter den vorgenannten Entwicklungen tendenziell abnimmt, zumindest gefährdet ist. Andererseits wird in nicht wenigen Staaten und internationalen Organisationen erkannt und anerkannt, dass die Zusammenarbeit zwischen staatlichen und gesellschaftlichen Akteuren notwendig für die Lösung systemischer Konflikte ist. Insofern ist festzustellen, dass zivilgesellschaftlicher Druck vielfach nicht nur von Regierungen wahrgenommen wird, sondern Teilhabe auch gewollt und aktiv nachgefragt wird. Dies schafft neue Räume konzertierten Handelns im Interesse des Friedens.

Welche Rolle spielen Frauen und Jugendliche zur Förderung von Transformations-Prozessen in fragilen Staaten?

Eine wichtige und immer noch unterschätzte Rolle. Die Friday for Future-Bewegung zeigt aktuell ja gerade sehr eindrucksvoll, welche politische Wucht eine von jungen Menschen getragene soziale Bewegung global binnen kurzer Zeit entfalten kann. Genauso werden Friedensprozesse eher entwickelt und gestaltet, wenn Frauen an ihnen aktiv beteiligt sind. Leider zeigt sich in vielen Fällen noch immer der Einfluss tradierter Rollenbilder auf die Möglichkeit, manchmal auch die Bereitschaft, zur politisch aktiven Partizipation.

Wann ist eine Einmischung von außen in innerstaatliche Konflikte sinnvoll und notwendig?

Vor allem, wenn sie von den Konfliktakteuren nachgefragt wird. Oder, wenn grundlegende Menschen- und Minderheitenrechte verletzt und nicht von nationalen Institutionen verfolgt werden – oder verfolgt werden können, weil die Institutionen hierfür zu schwach sind. Schließlich, wenn es ein klares rechtliches Mandat hierfür gibt, idealerweise durch die Vereinten Nationen oder eine Regionalorganisation.

Welchen Beitrag kann Deutschland leisten, um die zivilgesellschaftliche Beteiligung an Friedensprozessen und den Dialog zwischen lokalen Akteurinnen und Akteuren zu stärken?

Die Bundesregierung ist in den zurückliegenden Jahren in verstärkter Weise auf zivilgesellschaftliche Akteure zugegangen, sowohl um Beratung nachsuchend als auch für das Ziel der Kooperation. Dies hat zum einen geholfen, die Palette friedenspolitischer Wirksamkeit deutscher Beiträge zu stärken, zum anderen auch diese Palette zu erweitern, von der Friedensförderung bis zur Entwicklungszusammenarbeit. Vieles davon genießt internationale Anerkennung. Deutschland sollte an dieser Praxis nicht nur festhalten, sondern sie weiter ausbauen!

Prof. Hans-Joachim Gießmann ist Geschäftsführer der Berghof Foundation. Die Berghof Foundation unterstützt Konfliktparteien und lokale Akteure und Akteurinnen durch Friedensförderung, Friedenserziehung und Konflikttransformation in ihren Bemühungen, dauerhaften Frieden zu erreichen.

Maritime Politics in the "Indo-Pacific": What Future for the Rules-Based Order?

GIGA Event - 19. August 2019 - 15:21
Lectures and discussion Hamburg GIGA Forum Referent Nils Haupt (Hapag Lloyd AG), Qing Liu (University of Hamburg), Alexander Proelss (University of Hamburg), Christian Wirth (GIGA) Moderation

Bernhard Bartsch (Bertelsmann Foundation)

Adresse

GIGA
Neuer Jungfernstieg 21
20354 Hamburg

Forschungsschwerpunkte Macht und Ideen Regionen GIGA Institut für Asien-Studien Anmeldung erforderlich

Seiten

SID Hamburg Aggregator – SID Mitglieder Update abonnieren