Sie sind hier

SID Mitglieder Update

Climate Finance: Perspectives on Climate Finance from the Bottom Up

DEVELOPMENT - 23. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

Tens of billions of US dollars are programmed from developed to developing countries to assist them in dealing with the impacts of climate change or to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This is the world of climate finance, a stream of money which includes public funding set to swell to $100 billion yearly by 2020. These sums conceal agenda-setting stories on how different countries are coping with climate change. Drawing on data analysis and interviews with beneficiaries of climate finance, this article examines local and adaptation funding as two entry points into the field, connecting different perspectives on climate finance.

Exterminator Genes: The Right to Say No to Ethics Dumping

DEVELOPMENT - 23. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

The scientific-industrial complex is promoting a new wave of genetically modified organisms, in particular gene drive organisms, using the same hype with which they tried to persuade society that GMOs would be a magic bullet to solve world hunger. The Gates Foundation claims that GDOs could help wipe out diseases such as malaria. Powerful conservation lobby groups claim GDOs will protect engendered species. Not only are the benefits from GDOs based, like their predecessors, on flawed ecological thinking, but they are backed by the same agri-business interests that have devastated agroecological farming systems. The rights of communities to say ‘no’ to new genetic technologies is being eroded, despite United Nations agreements, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity, which call for the free, prior and informed consent of affected communities to be respected. By exporting their field trials to countries with weak regulatory regimes and lowering of the standards of consent the Gates Foundation’s Target Malaria project has already been guilty of ethics dumping. These developments demonstrate the urgent need to democratize the development of new technologies.

Economic Rights Over Data: A Framework for Community Data Ownership

DEVELOPMENT - 23. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

With digitalization increasingly pervading every aspect of the economy, data rights cannot be seen solely as about privacy or otherwise just in an individualistic framework. Valuable data is often aggregated, group or anonymized data, and thus we make a case for collective rights over the economic resource of data. The article proposes a framework for community data ownership as being necessary for economic justice. It means that a national community, city, village or neighbourhood community, as well as communities/groups of workers, traders and producers, collectively have primary economic rights over the data that they contribute to different digital platforms. Unless such new alternative frameworks are developed, the proliferation of free trade agreements as well as efforts at a WTO plurilateral on e-commerce—with their ‘global free flow of data’ doctrine—will lock the default of de facto data ownership rights being solely that of the collectors of data.

The Museum of Fetishes

DEVELOPMENT - 23. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

In the 1950s and 1960s, exhibitions such as the World’s Fair portrayed visions of the future in which technology, driven by boundless human ingenuity, opened up vistas ‘of limitless promise’ in a world seemingly emptied of political and ecological conflict. Today it’s easy to laugh at such portrayals, but many contemporary discussions about ‘energy alternatives’ and similar subjects suffer from the same fetishising of technology.

Inequalities, Caste, and Social Exclusion: Dalit Women’s Citizenship

DEVELOPMENT - 23. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

The article focuses on the problematic issues of the extreme degree of inequalities, discrimination and social exclusion as faced by women and in particular Dalit women in a democracy. Social justice is the central column of a socially inclusive democracy and the lack of it is reflected in the unequal economic, political and social status of women as is so highly evidenced in the case of Dalit (Dalit means ‘broken, scattered’ in Hindi, Sanskrit and refers to ethnic groups. The term is officially referred by the State as scheduled caste.) women and other marginalized groups in India.

SDG Indicators and BS/Index: The Power of Numbers in the Sustainable Development Debate

DEVELOPMENT - 20. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

Four years after the adoption of the SDGs, measuring progress towards them has been elusive. The ‘silo approach’ of pursuing each goal independently is stretched to its limit by the official Global Indicators Framework trying to count for each target, but lacking data or even agreed methodology for more than half of them. On the other hand, the attempt to reduce progress towards the SDGs to a single number ends up ignoring the many trade-offs between well-being associated to material consumption and planetary boundaries.

Anti-development Impacts of Tax-Related Provisions in Proposed Rules on Digital Trade in the WTO

DEVELOPMENT - 20. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

The ability of developing countries to achieve the SDGs will depend in large part on their ability to mobilize resources including through taxation. But new proposed rules in the WTO are threatening all countries’ ability to generate fiscal revenues through taxing the activity of transnational corporations. Under the guise of new talks on ‘e-commerce’, the largest TNCs are seeking to rig international rules to prevent governments from being able to assess tariffs on international transactions, as well as to assess taxes on corporate profits. If the talks in the WTO result in a binding agreement, the fastest-growing and most profitable sectors of the economy will be permanently released from the responsibility of contributing to the social and physical infrastructure on which their businesses are based, and governments will be unable to meet the social and development needs of their populations.

Development Justice in the Digital Paradigm: Agenda 2030 and Beyond

DEVELOPMENT - 20. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

Digital and data technologies are not merely tools or enablers of development; they are the scaffolds of a new social paradigm. As data flows through a more and more interconnected planet, the capture of network-data spaces by corporate and state interest recasts opportunity structures, heightening inequalities between, and within, countries. The intertwining of technological architectures and socio-economic structures presents key concerns for a transformative vision of development for people and planet alike. This article examines why and how norms and rules at global, national and local levels need to be overhauled towards a development justice that protects and promotes economic justice, redistributive justice, social justice, environmental justice and institutional accountability.

Surfing the Technological Tsunami: The Need for Participatory Technology Assessment

DEVELOPMENT - 20. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

The article illustrates the clear gap between the swift technological advancement of our time and adequate policies to regulate it on global, regional, and local levels. It argues not enough time and attention is given to properly assess the risks and impacts of a technology taking into account its whole lifecycle, and that civil society and potentially negatively affected social groups should be a vital participant in such assessment.

World Bank Financializing Development

DEVELOPMENT - 20. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

This article critically reviews the World Bank’s reorientation from its traditional role as a lender for major development projects to become a broker for private investment. It highlights the follies of the Bank’s ‘billions to trillions’ agenda, rebranded as Maximizing Finance for Development, that seeks to use aid and public money to leverage private finance, supposedly to fill the financing gap for achieving the SDGs. While such leveraging has failed to raise substantial finance, the Bank’s promotion of PPPs and ‘de-risking’ foreign private finance in developing countries has significantly increased risk for developing country governments. Focusing on ‘blending’ aid with private finance has obscured crucial measures such as macro-prudential regulations and international cooperation to address systemic issues, e.g., harmful tax competition and illicit capital outflows from developing countries via transfer pricing and tax havens. The B2T/MFD hype has also deflected attention from stagnant and declining aid flows, and onerous conditionalities, especially for the least developed and other fragile economies.

Science, Technology and Innovation: Implications for Africa

DEVELOPMENT - 20. September 2019 - 0:00
Abstract

The article makes the case for the precautionary principle, where the balance of nature needs to trump the immediate profit of innovation. The penetration of technology in Africa revives old stereotypes about the continent, hegemonic dynamics reminiscent of colonization, and stir a verity of social conflicts as profits and corporate interests come before the people and the environment.

Soziale Ungleichheit überwinden – von der Utopie zur Realität

VENRO - 19. September 2019 - 15:58

„Soziale Ungleichheit überwinden – von der Utopie zur Realität“ – unter dieser Zielsetzung fand am 12. September 2019 unsere jährliche Konferenz zur Umsetzung der Agenda 2030 für nachhaltige Entwicklung statt. Gemeinsam mit rund 160 Teilnehmenden aus den Bereichen Entwicklung, Umwelt und Klima sowie Soziales diskutierten wir über Ursachen und Perspektiven sowie konkrete Maßnahmen zur Überwindung sozialer Ungleichheit. Abseits der Diskussionsrunden boten sich bei der Konferenz zudem viele Gelegenheiten zum Austausch mit anderen Teilnehmenden.

Vier Erkenntnisse, die die Debatte über soziale Ungleichheit prägen, nehme ich von dem Konferenztag mit:

Soziale Ungleichheit – eine Frage der Definition: Wo soziale Ungleichheit anfängt, ist durchaus umstritten: Soll sie allein über das verfügbare Einkommen, das Vermögen oder über die Fähigkeiten und Kapazitäten eines Individuums gemessen werden? Auch ist umstritten, wie sie überwunden werden kann: Ist die Initiative der oder des Einzelnen gefragt? Wann sollten oder müssen Staat und Politik Maßnahmen ergreifen? Diese Fragen müssen – wie auch bei der Konferenz – immer wieder aus unterschiedlichen Perspektiven beleuchtet und gemeinsam verhandelt werden. Unstrittig indes war: Extreme Armut und Hunger sind die gravierendsten Ausprägungen sozialer Ungleichheit. Sie gilt es überall – im globalen Süden und auch in Europa – mit allen Mitteln zu bekämpfen.

Soziale Ungleichheit ist menschengemacht: Wir definieren nicht nur, was wir unter sozialer Ungleichheit verstehen. Wir tragen auch dazu bei, dass die Welt tatsächlich ungleich ist und bleibt. Deshalb muss der Blick stärker auf Exklusionsprozesse gelenkt werden. Wie genau werden die Reichen reicher, die Armen ärmer? Warum besteht weiterhin Ungleichheit zwischen Männern und Frauen? Und wie schlagen sich diese ökonomischen und sozialen Ungleichheiten auf die Möglichkeiten nieder, Einfluss auf politische Entscheidungsprozess zu nehmen? Was wir also brauchen sind wirkungsvollere Ansätze, die den Zugang zu politischen Regulierungs- und Entscheidungsprozessen auch für von Armut betroffene und marginalisierte Bevölkerungsgruppen erleichtern. Dafür braucht es eine starke Zivilgesellschaft, die eine solche Perspektive eröffnet und progressive Ansätze zur Überwindung sozialer Ungleichheit einfordert.

Eine ehrliche Debatte über Verantwortung und Kosten des Klimawandels führen: Maßnahmen zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung können soziale Ungleichheit verschärfen. Beispielsweise werden in der Lausitz durch den Ausstieg aus der Kohle viele Menschen ihre Arbeitsplätze verlieren und werden möglicherweise deshalb deutliche Einkommensverluste hinnehmen müssen, selbst wenn sie in den Tourismus oder in Pflegeberufe wechseln können. Mit einem teilweise deutlich geringeren Einkommen schränkt sich der wirtschaftliche und soziale Spielraum ein. In der Diskussion wurde deutlich, dass diese Herausforderung von Politik und Wirtschaft noch nicht ausreichend klar benannt, geschweige denn angegangen wird. Deshalb gab es den Aufruf an Politik, Zivilgesellschaft und Wirtschaft eine „ehrliche Debatte über den Strukturwandel“ zu führen. Gemeinsam mit den Betroffenen – und nicht über ihre Köpfe hinweg – müsse entschieden werden, wie dieser sozial gerecht angegangen werden sollte.

Mit „der Wirtschaft“ reden: Rechtliche Regelung vs. freiwillige Selbstverpflichtung zur Verwirklichung sozial-ökologischer und menschenrechtlicher Standards bei der Produktion und in den globalen Lieferketten – Zivilgesellschaft und Unternehmenstehen sich teilweise kontrovers gegenüber. In der Diskussion wurde aber deutlich, dass ein konstruktiver Dialog bestehende Meinungsverschiedenheiten, wie soziale und ökologische Standards und die Menschenrechte in Produktion und Lieferkette durchgesetzt werden können, auflösen kann. Denn auch deutschen Unternehmen ist am Schutz der Menschenrechte und der Umwelt gelegen. Nur gemeinsam wird man eine Lösung finden.

Wer sich selbst einen kurzen Eindruck von der Konferenz verschaffen möchte, sollte einen Blick auf das Graphic Recording werfen.

Beeindruckt hat mich darüber hinaus wieder einmal der breite Veranstalterkreis der Konferenz und das große Interesse an einer Sektoren übergreifenden Diskussion über nachhaltige Entwicklung: Die Konferenz wurde von VENRO, dem Forum Umwelt und Entwicklung, dem Deutschen Naturschutzring, der Diakonie Deutschland, dem Paritätischer Gesamtverband, dem Forum Menschenrechte, dem CorA-Netzwerk für Unternehmensverantwortung und der Klima-Allianz Deutschland ausgerichtet. Sie ist mittlerweile die größte jährlich stattfindende zivilgesellschaftliche Konferenz zur Verwirklichung nachhaltiger Entwicklung in Deutschland. Die Agenda 2030 für nachhaltige Entwicklung kommt vier Jahre nach ihrer Verabschiedung endlich in der deutschen Zivilgesellschaft an.

Abschließend möchte ich noch auf das Netzwerk Agenda 2030 hinweisen. Dieses bietet Dachverbänden und Netzwerken der deutschen Zivilgesellschaft die Möglichkeit zum Austausch und zu gemeinsamen Aktivitäten rund um die nachhaltige Entwicklung. Aus seinem Kreis stammen die Veranstalter_innen der Konferenz und die Herausgeber_innen des jährlichen SDG-Reports. Das Netzwerk wird koordiniert von VENRO und dem Forum Umwelt und Entwicklung.

Seiten

SID Hamburg Aggregator – SID Mitglieder Update abonnieren